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Old March 3, 2018, 08:30 AM   #1
OhioGuy
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Would the Ruger Precision Rimfire be a good first rifle?

I'm in the market for a rimfire bolt action rifle that I can use to get really good at marksmanship. I've been looking at the Ruger American because it's inexpensive and I enjoyed shooting it as a rental. I want something that can grow with me as I improve, but can also be used for my sons as they learn to shoot.

The American can fit my 10 year old with the compact stock insert, but the Precision can telescope more easily. I've seen videos of people drilling steel plates at 400 yards with the Precision and it seems it's a much more adaptable platform, and much better out of the box for not that much more money.

Also looks like it can only use optics for sighting?

Would this be my best overall option?
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Old March 3, 2018, 11:35 AM   #2
weblance
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My only concern would be the trigger of the Precision Rifle. Can it be upgraded?
I dont know how good, or bad, the factory trigger is.

The 10/22 Target, or LVT(Accusport Light Varmint Target model 1234/1235/1237) might be a better choice... with a KIDD trigger upgrade. The KIDD trigger is perfect. Its a true "Glass Rod Break" trigger. The 10/22 Target has a barrel similar to the Precision Rifle, and will certainly be accurate. The LVT has a medium weight barrel, and is also very accurate.
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Old March 3, 2018, 08:33 PM   #3
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" I've seen videos of people drilling steel plates at 400 yards with the Precision"

If you really mean using a 22lr @ 400 yards,I wouldn't expect that sort of thing right out of the box. I'm not overly pleased with my RAR 17HMR. It's a far cry from it's cousin, the 77/17. Since the Precision is mostly a cosmetically altered RAR, I don't have the high expectations some users receive.
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Old March 4, 2018, 07:35 AM   #4
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Even if it can make those kinds of hits, it certainly doesn't mean that I can make those kinds of hits!

Is there a "known-good" bolt-action 22lr that's "the best" in terms of accuracy out of the box? Or is this a matter of choosing what fits me, and knowing I'll need to make upgrades along the way if I ever want to do more with it?

This is first and foremost a learning tool for me, and then my kids as they grow. My local range's longest rifle range is only 200 yards anyways, on certain days when they open it. Then it's for fun.

I'm sure if I get serious about target shooting, especially long range, I'll step up to a real caliber.
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Old March 4, 2018, 09:55 AM   #5
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I think it's a good choice, but I think there are a lot of good choices out there.

Someone above mentioned the 10/22 having after market trigger support. If you want a bolt gun, get a bolt gun. Don't let the 10/22 crowd influence you otherwise.

I would also take a look at Savage and CZ options. Better triggers in my opinion(varied by model of course).
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Old March 4, 2018, 10:52 AM   #6
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I've seen and handled the CZ model and it's a beauty. I know there's some people that have these guns for many years and have put many thousands of rounds through them and they're just about indestructible, and very very accurate. In fact if I weren't hoping to get something that could double as a good trainer for smaller people, like my kids, I would probably just get this one.
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Old March 4, 2018, 03:19 PM   #7
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They don't get much mention anymore but the Marlin bolt action rifles I have owned will shoot 1/2" to 1" groups at 50 yards until you are bored with them. You might hit a few pawn shops or gun shows with cash in hand. you will look a long time before you find one that will not shoot.

The marlin model 60 semi auto can also be an accurate gun. I have seen 1" groups at 100 yards posted over on rimfirecentral forum. Most of the Marlins can be bought used for $150 or less if you don't mind a few scratches on the stock. I bought a Marlin 75C, carbine version of the model 60 a couple of years ago from a seller in the local paper for $50 cash. I shot 300 rounds through without any problems and now it rides in my truck for an emergency use gun. Even used it to kill a 5 foot chicken snake.
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Old March 4, 2018, 04:53 PM   #8
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I have a CZ, it is an awfully good gun. Probably the best precision 22 short of a dedicated 22 target.

I had long tried to find a 22 that matched up to my mom's 22 pump I shot as a kid. That was a tack driver. Of course it helped having young eyes, the sights were basic of course.

I shoot my CZ at 50 yards. Shoots 1 MOA on a good day.

I scoped it, needs special rings but Warne makes them at a decent cost from Sportsmans (elsewhere more expensive)

It more than light enough to use as a field 22 and accurate enough for target work.

It is somewhat expensive. I would not turn down a Marlin if I could have found one. My brother has one, not as good as the CZ but we finally found some 22 ammo it likes.

At least his vs the CZ, the CZ shoots everything decently while it has its preference for some over others.
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Old March 4, 2018, 04:54 PM   #9
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Savage MK II FVT, I believe has target sites option and is designed for precision play time. I just don't like the looks of the Ruger Precision Rimfire. Others like the CZ 452 or 455 are classic beauties that you seldom hear anyone complain about.
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Old March 4, 2018, 06:30 PM   #10
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Quote:
Originally Posted by weblance View Post
My only concern would be the trigger of the Precision Rifle. Can it be upgraded?
I dont know how good, or bad, the factory trigger is.

The 10/22 Target, or LVT(Accusport Light Varmint Target model 1234/1235/1237) might be a better choice... with a KIDD trigger upgrade. The KIDD trigger is perfect. Its a true "Glass Rod Break" trigger. The 10/22 Target has a barrel similar to the Precision Rifle, and will certainly be accurate. The LVT has a medium weight barrel, and is also very accurate.
Trigger should be adjustable from the factory, similar to the Americans. Lighter weight is easily achieved by swapping the trigger spring with one from a ball point pen, if one wants it lighter than the adjustment range.

Swapping the springs on my American Rinfire dropped it to roughly 13oz.
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Old March 4, 2018, 07:22 PM   #11
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CZ trigger is ok but not great. Its a good enough field trigger, just not target.

There is something called Yo Dave for it that might help if truly target wanted.

Timney makes one as well but $100 into a $350 gun for a trigger seems to much.

I am ok with it and I mostly target shoot.
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Old March 4, 2018, 08:36 PM   #12
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The American can fit my 10 year old with the compact stock insert, but the Precision can telescope more easily.
I started my daughter at that age. As you know from the rate at which you buy clothes, you can get the size perfect in April and it won't fit in August. A wide range of adjustment is too good an attribute to pass up in a youth rifle, imo.

I bought her an RAR. The trigger was not an impediment for her.

For a first rifle, I like the idea of the transparency of operation and the series of deliberate actions necessary prior to taking the shot. Otherwise, I'd have just taken a saw to a 10/22.
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Old March 5, 2018, 06:56 AM   #13
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The American can fit my 10 year old with the compact stock insert, but the Precision can telescope more easily. I've seen videos of people drilling steel plates at 400 yards with the Precision and it seems it's a much more adaptable platform, and much better out of the box for not that much more money.
I suggest the American. I would prefer to start a 10 year old with open iron sights. If not, he will be pretending to have bad eye sight his whole life. It is not eye sight, it is confidence. I would start with open iron sights for a year. start him prone at 25 yards, and then advance to sitting and then standing. Then move on to an aperture rear. Later in a few years with the adult module, let him try a scope or dot. Not as a crunch but as another sighting option. A first gun does not need a match trigger. Probably not even a good idea. The american trigger is fine and it can be adjusted down with a spring.

I am not aware of any accuracy advantage between any of the american or precision rimfire models. The up charge is for the stock. It is less adaptable, due to being an optics only platform.

The cz is a better rifle, but it lacks the adjustability you need.
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Old March 5, 2018, 08:44 AM   #14
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I am not aware of any accuracy advantage between any of the american or precision rimfire models. The up charge is for the stock. It is less adaptable, due to being an optics only platform.
My two cents. I dislike notch sights on rifles. They afford enough precision for a pistol, but not a rifle. Aperture sights make more sense and allow the sort of accuracy that lets a shooter know he is improving.

AR aperture sights should be readily adaptable to the Ruger Precision via picatinny rail.
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Old March 5, 2018, 10:53 AM   #15
OhioGuy
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Originally Posted by fourbore View Post
I suggest the American. I would prefer to start a 10 year old with open iron sights. If not, he will be pretending to have bad eye sight his whole life. It is not eye sight, it is confidence. I would start with open iron sights for a year. start him prone at 25 yards, and then advance to sitting and then standing. Then move on to an aperture rear. Later in a few years with the adult module, let him try a scope or dot. Not as a crunch but as another sighting option. A first gun does not need a match trigger. Probably not even a good idea. The american trigger is fine and it can be adjusted down with a spring.

I am not aware of any accuracy advantage between any of the american or precision rimfire models. The up charge is for the stock. It is less adaptable, due to being an optics only platform.

The cz is a better rifle, but it lacks the adjustability you need.
Would you suggest the compact (18") or standard (22") barrel? I can't imagine this would make any appreciable difference in weight, etc. for a smaller shooter. I would get the longer barrel for myself...my assumption being that simply using the compact stock length will make the difference for a kid being able to also use the rifle?
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Old March 5, 2018, 11:30 AM   #16
RC20
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My two cents. I dislike notch sights on rifles. They afford enough precision for a pistol, but not a rifle. Aperture sights make more sense and allow the sort of accuracy that lets a shooter know he is improving.
I don't either but that is also what I learned to shoot with and when the eyes were good I could shoot them well.

Much to everyone's amazement (I was even more stunned than they were) I shot a card in half edgewise with my moms pump 22.

As much luck as anything, but the gun had to shoot and the shooter had to have the act together to bring it to be.

CZ (at least the Military Trainer) has a decent rear sight.
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Old March 5, 2018, 09:15 PM   #17
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I have both a savage Mk.2 FVT and a CZ mod 455, both comparably accurate. My CZ has a standard notch rear sight compared to the Savages rear peep and circular from sight, as well as the savage accu-trigger system allowing for custom setting of the trigger. And as with most good quality .22's they are more accurate than most shooters.
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Old March 5, 2018, 10:59 PM   #18
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Get the RAR, the precision rifle is set up more for prone or bench shooting paper targets. Kids will get bored with shooting paper, they want to see the target spin or bounce or fall over, something with action. I'm 70 years old and shoot silhouette matches and enjoy hearing the ping of the bullet hitting the steel and the silhouette falling over. Silhouette is shot standing on two feet using no sling or any other support, definitely a humbling game. There is a lot of satisfaction in shooting well without any support. I have and still shoot rimfire and center fire benchrest but it does get a bit boring after awhile. When your boys get older then get the precision rifle.
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Old March 6, 2018, 12:50 AM   #19
johnwilliamson062
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They don't get much mention anymore but the Marlin bolt action rifles I have owned will shoot 1/2" to 1" groups at 50 yards until you are bored with them.
I have a marlin bolt gun and it is quite accurate. There are other areas where it has not impressed me though. Specifically, where the bolt knob rides on the receiver the receiver has worn. That is after... IDK, 10k rounds give or take a few thousand, but that is not the part of the rifle I would expect to wear.
I have always liked the tube magazine.

YOu could do much worse than the Ruger.
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Old March 7, 2018, 08:46 AM   #20
OhioGuy
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So with the Ruger American Rifle, it looks like I'd get the following for possibly as low as $300.
  • An inherently accurate rifle for most purposes
  • Decent open sights, rear notch and fiber optic front
  • Adaptability to add different sights
  • Ability to add optics, scopes, etc.
  • Flexibility to shorten the stock for smaller shooters

So it seems like a winner?

The Savage Mk.2 FVT is about $100 more (?) and comes with adjustable target sights that are well reviewed...I assume it can also take a scope or optics...and has a heavier, more accurate barrel.

Maybe the latter would be better?

Last edited by OhioGuy; March 7, 2018 at 08:52 AM.
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Old March 7, 2018, 11:39 AM   #21
Areoflyer09
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I’m quite fond of my RAR, action is almost as smooth as my T-Bolt and way better than the action in my wife’s MKII. Our MKII doesn’t have the acutrigger but with patience/practice it can shoot just as accurately as the RAR for us. I can’t comment on the quality between the Ruger and the Savage, as my RAR is the Talo edition and our Savage is the most basic rifle they make. Not a fair comparison.

Given that you wanted to be able to teach with it, I think the ability to run the shorter stock is a huge benefit.

For what it’s worth, my RAR has a medium weight barrel, I guess. It’s not as thin as my T-Bolt barrel, but it’s not as thick as RAR target barrel either. The T-Bolt is more accurate. Barrel weight hasn’t been the deciding factor for accuracy in my experience.
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Old March 8, 2018, 07:26 AM   #22
agtman
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Is there a "known-good" bolt-action 22lr that's "the best" in terms of accuracy out of the box? Or is this a matter of choosing what fits me, and knowing I'll need to make upgrades along the way if I ever want to do more with it?
I have several models of the CZ .22s, (the older 452s), and they were all accurate out of the box. The 455s are supposed to be just as good.

Quote:
This is first and foremost a learning tool for me, and then my kids as they grow.
IMO, the *best* boys' .22 starter rifle that a growing kid can shoot thru adolescence well into young adulthood is the CZ 455 Scout.

Unlike most of "youth" .22 rifles with waay too short LOPs which the kid outgrows in a couple of years, the Scout's LOP is just right. Heck, I love mine and I'm 6'3.

Good luck.
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Old March 8, 2018, 04:28 PM   #23
johnwilliamson062
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Decent open sights, rear notch and fiber optic front
I've yet to shoot notch sights on a rifle and be satisfied. There are probably aftermarket rearsight upgrades available, but tey will likely put you very close to the more expensive Savage.
I think the only rifles I own with stock sights are military surplus and they pretty much all have peep sights to begin with.
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