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Old December 26, 2019, 10:23 AM   #26
buck460XVR
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Jim Watson View Post
Ah, but does all .357 loaded ammo? Without running loaded rounds through the sizing die.
Quote:
Originally Posted by rodfac View Post
. Yep. My thought exactly...
Kinda where I am at. Again, all the OP's ammo fits in every other charge hole/chamber of two guns except for one. This is a clear indication that something is off with that one charge hole. Regardless that post-sizing the rounds allows the ammo to be chambered in the one chamber, the fact remains, that it is of a different dimension than the others. If the ammo did not chamber in any of the Ruger charge holes then I would think it was just a matter that the chambers on the Ruger were a tad tighter than the Smith. But this ain't what's happening. Post sizing ammo generally is a fix for another problem and the problem seems to be one charge hole in a line of guns from a manufacturer well known for having mismatched or undersized charge holes. IMHO, the fix is not to resize all of ones ammo to accommodate one errant charge hole. That difference in the chamber will create a difference in pressure and may well make a difference in POI from the others. As I said before, even with post sizing and the capability to now chamber unfired rounds, it may mean sticky extraction from that one chamber after firing due to it being undersized. Why not just find out for sure what's going on? If Ruger's customer service is a great as everyone claims, why not call them and have them give a look? One ain't out anything. Since the OP claims he rarely shoots the revolver, it ain't like he will miss it for a coupla weeks. A call to Ruger costs nuttin' and may result in a pre-paid label and a free fix. One of the reasons we pay good money for a quality firearm from a reputable manufacturer is for customer service/support. Why not use it instead of creating another step in the reloading process?
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Old December 26, 2019, 11:35 AM   #27
tank1949
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Thanks to all, even the folks who didn't fully read my initial post. But, even I made a mistake. I resized ONLY the examined rounds that would NOT easily eject from the identified chamber/cylinder. I examined around 500 and maybe 50 or so were tight. They are the ones that I resized, not all 500. And as some might have missed my text, back in the day before some of the people reading this post were born, resizing reloaded magnum ammo helped (but didn't totally) keep bullets from dislodging in brass under violent recoil (at least that was the belief) , even after hard roll-crimped. It has also been my experience that manufactures do not condone shooting reloads. All of my factory (NEW) bullets ejected with little effort. Therefore, it is reasonable to assume that each chamber/cylinder was reamed within Ruger's specs., even though one was "tight." I was careless in not adjusting my Dillon to where it needed to be concerning different revolvers. I have never had issues with semi-auto pistols or rifles. Again, THXs to all!
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Old December 26, 2019, 12:05 PM   #28
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The issue may not have been the adjustment of your Dillon setup. Dies are dies, and I've never heard of a seating/crimping die that had any adjustment for diameter.

First off, Ruger's long had a reputation for uneven chamber diameters. Jim March posted about this frequently. If I remember correctly (and I may have it reversed), in the "old days" Ruger bored their cylinders using six drill bits in a fixture, and all the holes were done simultaneously. Apparently it was not unusual for one or a couple to be tight as the cutters wore out. More recently, Ruger switched to CNC machines and all the chambers are done sequentially with the same cutter.

That said, how it happened isn't as important as the fact that you got a cylinder with one tight chamber. But not that tight, since it has no problem with factory ammo, and it appears (if I read your follow-up post correctly) that it also handled 450 out of 500 of your reloads okay. Are all the reloads the same headstamp? Brass from different makers may (in fact, generally does) have slightly different wall thicknesses. That alone could explain your problem.

It also appears that you have found a workable solution, so that's good. I would still do a bit of polishing on the tight chamber, but that's just me.

Out of curiosity, which Lee die did you use for resizing -- the decapping die with the decapping pin removed, or the Lee Factory Crimp Die?
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Old December 26, 2019, 12:23 PM   #29
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I THINK Ruger used to bore chambers one at a time and now broaches all 6 at once, but I could have that backwards. Either way, one of us is bound to be right!

Merry Christmas!
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Old December 26, 2019, 01:08 PM   #30
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I did a bit of searching. I found one of Jim March's nuggets in this thread:
https://thefiringline.com/forums/sho...+cylinder+bore

Post #8:

Quote:
The large-frame guns made from 2007 forward have some accuracy advantages - the cylinder was built with each chamber reamed with the same bit/reamer set, instead of all six at once. That gives better uniformity. The new chambers seem to be tighter as well, on average, in a good way. You can ID these newer guns with a "lawyer's warning label" ("read the manual" and that sort of thing) UNDER the barrel instead of the older side-barrel system.

That's with the large-frames. The mid-frames (NewVaq, Flattop Blackhawks in 357, 44Spl, 45) got the cylinder improvement starting in 2004 (New Vaquero) and often had side-barrel warnings if pre-2007.
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Old December 26, 2019, 01:57 PM   #31
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Thanks, but I was referring to Security Six double/single action revolver, and the gun was made in early 70s.
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Old December 27, 2019, 03:16 AM   #32
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What did he say?

What did he say? One could make a case for communication problems. Parts of this account have been described several different ways. This thing could go on forever with these changes. The guy needs to get a taper crimp die. He needs to retire that mishmash of dies. I might suggest, since he rarely shoots the Ruger or the Smith, is to buy factory ammo for those guns.
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Old December 28, 2019, 03:45 PM   #33
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Amen! The Lee Carbides work fine.
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