The Firing Line Forums

Go Back   The Firing Line Forums > The Skunkworks > Handloading, Reloading, and Bullet Casting

Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread
Old December 4, 2009, 12:24 PM   #1
Lilswede1
Senior Member
 
Join Date: September 8, 2008
Location: NW Wash State
Posts: 216
What causes this?

Cracks in case necks.
Just started recently.
What's the most common causes?
Using a .223 bolt action with 26.0 gr. 2230 w/ 50 gr. Blitzking.
Once-fired cases so ammo has been reloaded once/twice at most.

Last edited by Lilswede1; December 4, 2009 at 07:18 PM.
Lilswede1 is offline  
Old December 4, 2009, 12:26 PM   #2
Mike Irwin
Staff
 
Join Date: April 13, 2000
Location: Northern Virginia
Posts: 40,285
Usually work hardening caused by firing and reloading.

What are you shooting that you're seeing this?

Rifle? Handgun?

How many times have you reloaded them?

Are you annealing your brass?
__________________
"The gift which I am sending you is called a dog, and is in fact the most precious and valuable possession of mankind" -Theodorus Gaza

Baby Jesus cries when the fat redneck doesn't have military-grade firepower.
Mike Irwin is offline  
Old December 5, 2009, 11:26 AM   #3
A_Gamehog
Senior Member
 
Join Date: February 9, 2009
Location: Central Oregun
Posts: 560
Questions for you

1). Who made the brass?
2). Did you trim inside or outside or neck turn?

Obviously longevity is not normal. Sometimes how you trim the case affects the times it can be loaded. These lathe type case trimmers that also camphor the case necks edge inside and outside while cutting to length. If these types of case trimmers (RCBS 3 way) are making the case neck edge sharp to to a point or a very thin surface, then the tool was setup wrong. If you removed too much metal to make the necks similar inside or outside you also could have lowered the usable life of the brass. I had split cases myself due to thin pointed necks. Overuse of the trimmer exaggerated, honed, the end case surface to an upside down V shape. I found that neck turning shortens the life of any brass and if you don't have a custom chamber it's wasted energy.

Your load is mild for that powder/bullet combo
__________________
"Happiness is knowing the Barred Owl is Eating the Spotted Owl and environmentalists are watching Nature take it's course"
A_Gamehog is offline  
Old December 5, 2009, 11:34 AM   #4
wncchester
Senior Member
 
Join Date: December 1, 2002
Posts: 2,832
Neck splits are the normal failure. Occasional annealing, perhaps every 506 firings, is the only way to extend the life until the bodies split. No big deal.

But, once you get a neck split in any batch, it's time to toss them all and get new cases.
wncchester is offline  
Old December 5, 2009, 11:55 AM   #5
Lilswede1
Senior Member
 
Join Date: September 8, 2008
Location: NW Wash State
Posts: 216
Maybe its the prepping

I use the RCBS electric case prepping machine that has 5 rotating stations.
One for deburring outside and one for deburring the inside. I have noticed that this will leave more of and "edge" on the case then if I do it by hand.
This is only on the very edge of the case neck.
Could this b causing the splits?
Lilswede1 is offline  
Old December 5, 2009, 01:22 PM   #6
wncchester
Senior Member
 
Join Date: December 1, 2002
Posts: 2,832
Not really, but putting a sharp edge on the case mouths likely accelerates things a little bit.

Splits occur due to metal fatigue from expanding when fired, sized down a tad more than it need be, then expanded again by loading and firing. Eventually it work hardens and it's elastic limits are exceeded. A thin place simply reaches its elastic limits sooner but eventualy any case neck. and body, will split.

Annealing softens the neck brass so it doesn't split until the whole process gets repeated. Annealing is much more demanding than is commonly believed; heating case necks to a red glow is MUCH to hot and damages the alloy.

.
wncchester is offline  
Old December 5, 2009, 03:53 PM   #7
brickeyee
Senior Member
 
Join Date: December 29, 2004
Posts: 3,342
Quote:
I have noticed that this will leave more of and "edge" on the case then if I do it by hand.
You are overdoing the bevels if you end up with an edge.

All you are trying to do on the outside is remove any burs.

Inside beveling can go a little further to help get bullets started, but there should still be a flat on between the inside and outside.
brickeyee is offline  
Old December 5, 2009, 06:28 PM   #8
Lilswede1
Senior Member
 
Join Date: September 8, 2008
Location: NW Wash State
Posts: 216
thanks for all the good advice

This is "once-fired" brass from a friend. He got a good deal on the brass at a gun show and gave 600 rds to me. I'm beginning to think this brass may have been reloaded more then advertised.
Brass has cleaned up really well and looks very good. No obvious signs of stress or separation at the base but one never knows for sure when you are buying it in bulk.
I will be more alert during the deburring process tomake sure I am not taking too much material off.
Lilswede1 is offline  
Old December 5, 2009, 06:48 PM   #9
wncchester
Senior Member
 
Join Date: December 1, 2002
Posts: 2,832
"This is "once-fired" brass from a friend. He got a good deal on the brass at a gun show and gave 600 rds to me. I'm beginning to think this brass may have been reloaded more then advertised."

I suspect so too. More than suspect in fact. Anneal the necks now and you can probably save the rest.

All tumbled/polished brass does look new, that's why I won't purchase anyone's polished brass unless it's nearly free.
wncchester is offline  
Old December 5, 2009, 07:11 PM   #10
Hog Hunter
Senior Member
 
Join Date: August 14, 2009
Location: Georgia
Posts: 386
i roll my brass in like a grease and when i first started reloading the first box i done i rolled the necks also and alot of them were cracked. from then on out i quit touching the necks to the grease and it hasnt done it since other than just using the brass over and over. im not saying thats wat it is, and maybe i done somethin diffrent other than that after the first time i reloaded i was pretty young but was going by the book. now i rarely have that problem, hope you figure it out.
Hog Hunter is offline  
Old December 6, 2009, 03:21 AM   #11
bamaranger
Senior Member
 
Join Date: October 9, 2009
Location: North Alabama
Posts: 6,841
there you go

Brass/components are so scarce that guys are hustling and scavaging brass everywhere. I live near a public range and used to have a ready supply of brass. That has all stopped. I used to get a breadbag full on any given trip.
The week before deer season was like a free brass day at Midway or something.
Last two years I got a single handful.

The off shoot is that guys have learned that stuff is scarce and shooters are willing to pay, and you see people in the brass business at gunshows.
I'm sure that your brass was somebody's discards, 'till they learned they could make some money on it.
bamaranger is offline  
Old December 7, 2009, 01:22 AM   #12
impalacustom
Senior Member
 
Join Date: January 26, 2009
Posts: 491
Never fired brass that is really old will split as well.
impalacustom is offline  
Reply

Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off

Forum Jump


All times are GMT -5. The time now is 03:42 AM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.7
Copyright ©2000 - 2019, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.
This site and contents, including all posts, Copyright © 1998-2018 S.W.A.T. Magazine
Copyright Complaints: Please direct DMCA Takedown Notices to the registered agent: thefiringline.com
Contact Us
Page generated in 0.06627 seconds with 8 queries