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Old September 23, 2023, 10:20 PM   #1
Pistoler0
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Is LOP longer when shooting prone?

I have found that when shooting prone, my eye relief to the scope is better if I adjust the length of the butt stock to be 1" or 1.5" longer compared to the LOP that is comfortable when shooting standing or off a bench.

Is this normal?

If so, how should I set up the scope in a rifle that does not have an on the fly adjustable LOP but that is going to be shot in different positions? Assuming the rifle is the correct LOP for my size, should I set up the scope so that the eye relief is perfect when standing or off a bench, and then live with the fact that my eye will be a little closer when shooting prone?

I understand that it might depend on what the main use of the rifle is going to be. This is my "do it all" .308 bolt action with a traditional stock that will be used for hunting, PRS matches and longer range shooting from the prone position.
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Old September 24, 2023, 12:59 AM   #2
tangolima
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Your neck. It is more horizontal in prone position.

I give priority to prone as it is more for longer distance higher precision shooting. Off hand is for closer range where eye relief can be compromised a little.

-TL

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Last edited by tangolima; September 24, 2023 at 01:07 AM.
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Old September 24, 2023, 11:12 PM   #3
Pistoler0
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Quote:
Originally Posted by tangolima View Post
Your neck. It is more horizontal in prone position.

I give priority to prone as it is more for longer distance higher precision shooting. Off hand is for closer range where eye relief can be compromised a little.

-TL

Sent from my SM-N960U using Tapatalk
That makes sense, about the more horizontal position of the neck adding some inches to LOP when prone, thank you!

I see what you say about prioritizing the set up for the prone position. Ufortunately in my case with my scope (US Optics TS-20X), if I set up like that then the eye box is unworkable when standing or off the bench. I am going to see if I can find a chassis with an on the fly LOP adjustment.
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Old September 24, 2023, 11:23 PM   #4
tangolima
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Try cranking your neck harder to put your cheek weld a bit forward when shooting non-prone. That is what I do. It is a bit uncomfortable at first but not too bad when used to it.

Also consider dropping magnification. It helps. Your scope is 20x? Isn't it hard to hold steady shooting offhand with that much magnification?

-TL

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Last edited by tangolima; September 24, 2023 at 11:39 PM.
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Old September 24, 2023, 11:55 PM   #5
Pistoler0
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I am going to try the set up as you recommend.

No, I don't use 20X when standing LOL, but I do off the bench and to me the eye relief is similar.

I am going to try to set the scope up for perfect eye relief when prone at 20X, then see how that translates to the standing position and bench.
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Old September 25, 2023, 12:14 AM   #6
tangolima
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Lower magnification for prone may open up the range of workable eye relief.

My eye degrades with age. Light sensitivity is the first thing goes. I must keep the exit pupil larger than my eye pupil, so I shoot below 12x, mostly at 4x fixed.

There has been discussion on this on this forum. I am among the minorities who favor low magnifications.

-TL

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Old September 25, 2023, 12:16 AM   #7
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Tile you head and look down. Look ahead normally (head level). Look up, head tilted up. Where is your face (eyes) in relation to your neck in each position?
Shooting prone is essentially looking UP, compared to a looking ahead.

Simple test, look straight ahead, put you finger next to the corner of your eye. Then tilt you head back and look at the ceiling. NOW where are your eyes in relation to your finger??

Mine are a few inches "up". Your head may be different, but I don't think all that much..
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Old December 15, 2023, 11:10 AM   #8
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This works out very well for me, in that my M70, w/ a Leupold VX-3i 2.5-8x36mm in Talley LW mounts, ends up with a long eye relief.

Mounted fully to the rear, the eye-box is just right for the lowest, 2.5x magnification, which is primarily used for still hunting and field position shooting.

Yet, from the prone, the 6-8x setting is just right.




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