The Firing Line Forums

Go Back   The Firing Line Forums > The Hide > The Art of the Rifle: General

Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread
Old August 25, 2023, 08:14 PM   #1
CEldon
Member
 
Join Date: August 23, 2023
Location: Michigan
Posts: 28
Scope mounting torque wrench suggestions

A couple of weeks ago i mounted a new Leupold scope. First time mounting a scope. Among other tools, the instructions suggested using a torque wrench/driver to tighten the screws to a specific torque.

I have a lot of basic tools, but not that one.

Any suggestions on a good, proven wrench?

Thanks
CEldon is offline  
Old August 25, 2023, 08:35 PM   #2
Lurch37
Senior Member
 
Join Date: August 6, 2006
Location: Middle of Nebraska
Posts: 932
I bought one of these a few years back and really like it.

https://www.wheelertools.com/gunsmit...et/553556.html
__________________
I reject your reality and substitute my own.
Lurch37 is offline  
Old August 26, 2023, 06:29 AM   #3
Nathan
Senior Member
 
Join Date: July 1, 2001
Posts: 6,229
Wheeler Digital

The digital has a wider range…

You don’t want a click off type. They torque spike and can damage low torque joints.
Nathan is offline  
Old August 26, 2023, 09:19 AM   #4
CEldon
Member
 
Join Date: August 23, 2023
Location: Michigan
Posts: 28
I see the Wheeler brand torque wrenches everywhere. It is a popular brand, and gets some pretty solid reviews, but i have decided to avoid anything from China as much as i can.

The Vortex brand (Taiwan) and Weaver (USA i think) seem to be the only USA options i can find right now. Finding the true manufacturing location for things is sometimes pretty difficult.

Another aspect of this search is the amount of torque required for mounting a scope. I don’t have the instructions in front of me, and I’m pretty sure all scope requirements are different, but is 10 fp a low enough tourque for the job?

Thanks
CEldon is offline  
Old August 26, 2023, 09:38 AM   #5
Nathan
Senior Member
 
Join Date: July 1, 2001
Posts: 6,229
To cover every optic mount I’ve run into, I would need 8-70inlbs.

I wish I knew who made one in the USA. To get that range, they often want you 2 buy 3 tools.
Nathan is offline  
Old August 26, 2023, 10:29 AM   #6
CEldon
Member
 
Join Date: August 23, 2023
Location: Michigan
Posts: 28
Thanks for the clarification. These tools are in “inch pounds”, not “foot”.

OK, so 8 is a good lower torque. I see a lot of these wrenches at 10.

As I have been opening my search efforts, I see that some bike focused wrenches, like Tektron, work in the same area. Does anyone use a non scope related wrench like this?
CEldon is offline  
Old August 26, 2023, 11:04 AM   #7
Ricklin
Senior Member
 
Join Date: February 22, 2008
Location: SW Washington state
Posts: 1,973
Torque is torque. Wat the tool is marketed for makes little difference, if any. As previously mentioned it's inch pounds, not foot.
The key is reasonable quality and the range of torque the tool is designed for. Choose a torque wrench where your desired torque is near the middle of the range of torque the tool is designed for. Getting close to the high or low torque value can produce undesirable results.
__________________
ricklin
Freedom is not free
Ricklin is offline  
Old August 26, 2023, 12:10 PM   #8
CEldon
Member
 
Join Date: August 23, 2023
Location: Michigan
Posts: 28
Good point! Torque is torque.

That opens the window a good bit. And the point of finding a wrench that is rated for my needs to be mid-range is a good point.

Thanks
CEldon is offline  
Old August 26, 2023, 12:23 PM   #9
CEldon
Member
 
Join Date: August 23, 2023
Location: Michigan
Posts: 28
I also see, on the Leupold site, that they say 28ip is the maximum torque. Like others have remarked, that seems like a very high torque for such a small screw. I guess there is also a chance of possibly distorting the inner workings of a scope if over torqued.

What does an 18ip +- torque sound like? A dependable middle ground?
CEldon is offline  
Old August 26, 2023, 12:49 PM   #10
GlenF
Member
 
Join Date: April 4, 2011
Location: Monett, Missouri
Posts: 98
Although not inexpensive, a TS-30 manufactured by Utica in Orangeburg, S.C. would eliminate any guesswork about accuracy.

The one I have used for circuit board hardware attachments had a range of 6 - 30in lb.

By the way " torque spike " is non existent on this device.

Last edited by GlenF; August 26, 2023 at 01:06 PM. Reason: speeeling
GlenF is offline  
Old August 26, 2023, 12:55 PM   #11
tangolima
Senior Member
 
Join Date: September 28, 2013
Posts: 3,675
10 to 70 inch-lb sounds right. The higher end of the range is for action screws.

The rings usually come with recommended torque settings. If not, the wrench usually comes with general recommendations on different applications.

I dust the rings and scope tube with rosin powder. It adds extra grip.

-TL

Sent from my SM-N960U using Tapatalk
tangolima is online now  
Old August 26, 2023, 01:02 PM   #12
Nathan
Senior Member
 
Join Date: July 1, 2001
Posts: 6,229
Quote:
Wat the tool is marketed for makes little difference, if any.
If accurately marketed, range and accuracy are balanced.
Nathan is offline  
Old August 26, 2023, 01:48 PM   #13
Paul B.
Senior Member
 
Join Date: March 28, 1999
Location: Tucson, AZ
Posts: 3,784
I've been using a Wheeler Fat Wrench for quite a while and have been perfectly satisfied with the tool. I haven't done any scope changes in a long time, probably not in the last 6 or 7 years and definitely haven't removed a barreled action for a stock for an even longer period than for a scope. Just haven't seen the need. I just use it now to insure screws have stayed tightened to the proper torque.
Paul B.
__________________
COMPROMISE IS NOT AN OPTION!
Paul B. is offline  
Old August 26, 2023, 02:15 PM   #14
CEldon
Member
 
Join Date: August 23, 2023
Location: Michigan
Posts: 28
I just looked at the Utica line of wrenches. Nice looking tool. The adjustable B line has a 15 to 75ip span. The lower 15ip may be just a little to high for some applications and you are absolutely correct, they are not inexpensive. If this was my bread and butter trade, the price might be more acceptable, but it's not. Nice looking tool though.

Using rosin powder seems like an added measure, but how does that powder do over time and does it effect the stability of the ring clamps?
CEldon is offline  
Old August 26, 2023, 04:09 PM   #15
Shadow9mm
Senior Member
 
Join Date: March 21, 2012
Location: Indianapolis, IN
Posts: 3,925
I got the wheeler fat wrench. Been great.
__________________
I don't believe in "range fodder" that is why I reload.
Shadow9mm is offline  
Old August 27, 2023, 11:24 AM   #16
ocharry
Senior Member
 
Join Date: October 20, 2006
Posts: 677
i have a weaver brand inlb driver wrench...i like it and it works fine..my boy has the wheeler brand and it too seem to do just fine

had it for 10+ years...seems to do just fine....lol.. 10 might be a little light...lol

one thing i havent seen anybody mention is that when you get finished using what ever brand you get....remember to always take the setting back to zero when you ar finshed....for storage

for me i dont really think it is about how accurate the wrench is....i think it is more about consistancy......yes accurate +/- 2-3%.....but i think it is more about consistancy....if you set it on 18 inlb and it turns out to be 20....or 16...as long as the screws/ bolts are the same i think you are golden

i dont think you would be bad with any of the brands out there....because any of them will be better than none

just my thoughts

ocharry
__________________
The felon does not fear the police, and he fears neither judge nor jury. Therefore what he must be taught to fear is his victim." - Lt. Col. Jeff Cooper, USMC
ocharry is offline  
Old August 27, 2023, 06:11 PM   #17
CEldon
Member
 
Join Date: August 23, 2023
Location: Michigan
Posts: 28
That’s interesting Ocharry, returning the tool to zero when you’re finished with it. Little points like that help keep things lasting and working correctly and longer.

It appears that the better made wrenches start somewhere around $75, on up to hundreds. Even those used on road bikes are in that range. I’ll pick one up here pretty soon.

Thanks again
CEldon is offline  
Old August 27, 2023, 06:23 PM   #18
Polinese
Senior Member
 
Join Date: September 27, 2010
Posts: 944
I have the Borka torque wrench set and love it.
Polinese is offline  
Old August 28, 2023, 09:08 AM   #19
CEldon
Member
 
Join Date: August 23, 2023
Location: Michigan
Posts: 28
The Borka brand is interesting. Their made primarily in the US, with some items coming from Taiwan. Snipercentral had a positive article on the company too, but the Borka web site has a “Temporary shutdown notice” that seems to be effecting shipping.

I’ll keep an eye out for that brand. Maybe in the used market.

Thanks
CEldon is offline  
Old August 28, 2023, 11:21 AM   #20
Pahoo
Senior Member
 
Join Date: February 16, 2006
Location: IOWA
Posts: 8,783
I do recomment you get a Torque Wrench ??

Quote:
I see the Wheeler brand torque wrenches everywhere. It is a popular brand, and gets some pretty solid reviews, but i have decided to avoid anything from China as much as i can.
I have been mounting scopes for a number of years and most of that time, without the use any kind of torque wrench. Bought a Wheeler about two years ago, mostly to confirm my historical procedure. Turns out that the Wheeler "suggested" setting was tighter. They list a target setting and that's fine. In actual use, there is a range and I happen to fall at the lower end.I have reworked some mounts that were so tight that it damages the scope tubes and that's ugly. .....

I understand that you want to shy away from anything that is made in China but that that's not working very well for any of "us"!!

Be Safe !!!
__________________
'Fundamental truths' are easy to recognize because they are verified daily through simple observation and thus, require no testing.
Pahoo is offline  
Old August 28, 2023, 01:55 PM   #21
seanc
Senior Member
 
Join Date: December 28, 1998
Posts: 583
I got the Wheeler Fat wrench after years of just wrenching down to what felt right, until I cracked a stock.

Advice from a machinist given years ago (for auto repair, but applies to any torque wrench):
1. Zero when putting away (already mentioned).
2. Never use it to loosen, only to tighten.
seanc is offline  
Old August 28, 2023, 08:57 PM   #22
44caliberkid
Senior Member
 
Join Date: May 15, 2017
Location: Iowa
Posts: 1,034
I have the Wheeler Fat Wrench too. No complaints.
44caliberkid is offline  
Old August 29, 2023, 09:04 AM   #23
ocharry
Senior Member
 
Join Date: October 20, 2006
Posts: 677
seanc.. that no. 2 you mentioned is a good one too

1. zero whan putting away

2. never use to loosen, only to tighten

ocharry
__________________
The felon does not fear the police, and he fears neither judge nor jury. Therefore what he must be taught to fear is his victim." - Lt. Col. Jeff Cooper, USMC
ocharry is offline  
Old August 29, 2023, 04:09 PM   #24
CEldon
Member
 
Join Date: August 23, 2023
Location: Michigan
Posts: 28
I picked up a Capri torque wrench yesterday, from Harbor Freight. It's a ASME/ISO certified, Taiwan manufactured wrench, 10-50 in-lb in 1 in-lb increments, 1/4 magitized hex, +-6% CW with 16 bits and a case.

The +-6% CW could be better, but if i stay 1in-lb under every time, I'll be good to go. The torqueed fasteners i will be using don't have that kind of critical torque requirements.

I removed and remounted the Leupold scope, using the regular hex wrench, and reinstalled everything with the Capri wrench. It was a good time to move the scope a little further forward too. The torque was surprisingly stronger than i had guesstimated on the first non-wrench effort.

In a week or so, i'll hit the range for a zeroing effort.

Thanks
CEldon is offline  
Old August 30, 2023, 12:45 PM   #25
Nathan
Senior Member
 
Join Date: July 1, 2001
Posts: 6,229
Not bad…+/-3 in lbs. I think even best quality torque wrenches are +/-3% of range.

Did it come with a calibration certificate showing the readings?
Nathan is offline  
Reply

Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off

Forum Jump


All times are GMT -5. The time now is 12:02 AM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.7
Copyright ©2000 - 2024, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.
This site and contents, including all posts, Copyright © 1998-2021 S.W.A.T. Magazine
Copyright Complaints: Please direct DMCA Takedown Notices to the registered agent: thefiringline.com
Page generated in 0.10111 seconds with 8 queries