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Old October 31, 2014, 04:49 PM   #26
Carne Frio
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An umbrella can be an effective alternative to canes and walking sticks.
http://real-self-defense.com/unbreakable-umbrella/
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Old October 31, 2014, 05:26 PM   #27
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I think that somebody trained to use a cane as a weapon would benefit from a cane in a self defense situation. Somebody that is not trained would probably wind up being beaten with their own cane. Barnaby Jones was a bad boy with his cane.......
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Old October 31, 2014, 07:19 PM   #28
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Posted by zach_: I think that somebody trained to use a cane as a weapon would benefit from a cane in a self defense situation.
So do I.

I also believe that a cane requires a lot less training than a knife, and in the case of an assault out does, less than a firearm.
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Old November 7, 2014, 07:14 PM   #29
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As everyone else has said, the cane would be the better option. I've often thought about getting a Cold Steel Blackthorn.
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Old November 7, 2014, 07:45 PM   #30
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Always thought one of the strengths of a crook top cane is to sweep your opponent off his feet. Saw a video where the author recommend striking low with the cane, knock your enemy over and harder to defend against.
IIRC hickory is more resilient than oak, absorbs shocks better, that's why oak is not used for baseball bats.
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Old November 17, 2014, 03:51 PM   #31
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Late to the discussion, but if you are considering a cane and/or a knife as part of your self-defense training, I recommend looking at Filipino Martial Arts...Arnis, Escrima/Eskrima, Kali..."same chicken, different recipe" as my grandmaster likes to say.

FMA starts with the stick/cane...impact weapons; this translates with slight modification to edged weapons which can also, again with slight modification, translates to empty hand techniques.

While much of what was been shown in Hollywood movies is choreographed to look good on screen, it does give an insight into the FMA techniques: the Bourne movies, the Transporter series; The Hunted; The Book of Eli. The fundamentals and basics are simple, the complexity comes from building on the simplicity.

This also leads to better understanding of range within a confrontation: close, medium, long, projectile. It also trains one in the use of force, escalation and deescalation: use of words, use of hands, use of arms (weapons - blade, impact or other) and deadly force.

Just as buying a gun doesn't make one a tier one operator, buying a knife or cane for self-defense without training doesn't me you can defend oneself.

Just my two cents.
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Old November 17, 2014, 11:42 PM   #32
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There are some canes that have brass balls on one end for gripping.

As you can guess, if THAT is the business end you will have a mace.

Sure, awareness and avoidance is best, but if stuck in the wrong situation and no roscoe at hand, yea I'd take a good cane.

Pity they frown upon sword canes.

You see, one could be Zatoichi.

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Old November 18, 2014, 01:05 PM   #33
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I started collecting canes as a young martial artist in the early 70's, and I've continued to collect them to the present.

I rather suspect that as I get older, I'll find them useful for more than just their potential for exigent defensive weapons and collector enjoyment.

When it comes to anticipating defending against a blade, distance is your friend. BTDT when someone tried to gut me with a large kitchen boning knife. A cane can help with providing some useful distance, presuming the user knows how to effectively use one. (That caveat is applicable to carrying a lockblade or clasp folder, too, meaning some user knowledge, training and experience can make a difference.)

This subject came up recently when I was meeting a friend at a cigar lounge. He's also retired LE (this year), and he's just a bit older, being in his middle 60's. He saw me walk in carrying a very nicely done white oak copy of a blackthorn knob-handled shillelagh, and it started a discussion about our shared use of canes.

During our conversation he said that sometimes when he didn't feel it appropriate to carry a retirement handgun (dinner & drinks, evening out to a special event, etc), he carried a stout cane and a very bright palm-sized flashlight with strobe capability (capable of causing momentary disorientation). A little prudent preparation on his part.

FWIW, as a working cop I always favored either the issued 26" & 36" wooden batons, as well as the issued hardwood Bokken Suburito I was given when I was part of a riot control tac unit. I occasionally carried either a standard or lightweight issued ASP toward the end of my career, because of my plainclothes assignment, but I never particularly cared for one (aside from its potential use as a yawara stick).
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Old November 18, 2014, 09:31 PM   #34
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Well, I got back from my out of town trip to Atlanta, and I ended up taking my Canemaster Cane, and a 5 inch fixed blade Dozier knife with me. I experienced no problems while flying with the cane, and I packed my hunting knife in my checked baggage without issue.

I didn't run into any problems that required the use of the cane or knife, but I did end up walking from the hotel one night to a service station to get a few groceries that the hotel didn't offer, and I noticed that after dark the attendant was protected by a glass shield from the customers. I know this is common in the city, but not something I am used to seeing in my home area. It made me think a little bit on the walk back, just how quick things can get out of hand, so I was pretty much on strong code yellow, and watching my 6 as I walked back to the hotel. And I definitely felt a bit safer with the cane and knife, then If I had not had them, although granted I could still have been it big trouble, under tough circumstances.

The cane has another advantage for the air line travel, I found out. As I was fixing to take my position in the back of a very long line to go through all of the checks, I was singled out and mustered to a much shorter line, and avoided having to stand in line for 45 minutes. Since my leg was really bothering me, because I had been on my feet so much for several days, I really welcomed the shortcut to the front of the line.
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Old November 20, 2014, 06:47 AM   #35
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Get yourself a photographers monopod. Its as big and as heavy as a police night stick. You can use it to help you take photos and self defense. No one has ever questioned me about it.

A cane you cant use unless you cant walk. A knife cant be carried outwardly. A monopod is very useful.

You may not need it for Atlanta, but I know you will need it overseas in the Carib, Italy, France, etc. I havent had any problems in Atlanta, but Ive had multiple problems overseas and even got robbed at gunpoint in St Martin right out on the beach in day time.

How to use a nightstick goes way beyond this forum. I believe this is more of a visual deterrant.
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Old November 20, 2014, 12:24 PM   #36
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My wife bought me this Bridges Door Knob Marine Corps cane years ago at Busch Gardens as a Gift.

http://www.incrediblecanes.com/bridg...ickspage2.html

You'll have to scroll thru to see the one I mean, but that gives you a chance to see all the offerings and styles. I have had it for nearly fifteen years. They were $40 then and are $50 now. A couple months ago, we came across a brand new one in an antique shop for $15 and snatched that one up to keep in her car. Now we have one in both vehicles. My original is a little worn with use on the brass head, but still more than serviceable.

The shaft of the cane is carbon fiber. Strong, slightly flexible, but firm. I have used the cane most of the time we are out since it's purchase. The brass head is heavy and with some practice you can flick it out and trap the foot of the cane under your armpit and accelerate the head quickly for a lateral strike and suck it back in to a control position before your opponent knows it left your hand.

You can also put a hand on either side of the strong carbon fiber shaft and use the "bar" to push away an attacker with a strike, block, or use a two handed strike at the knees or thighs holding the BALL head for control to disable the attacker so you can make a getaway.

Tip speed on the end of the cane will give it amazing power.
Bridges.... makes golf clubs....
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Old November 20, 2014, 12:30 PM   #37
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Nice.

I've got the regular "Flowers" Bridges cane, myself. Found it in a drugstore while visiting family in WA one trip.
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Old November 21, 2014, 01:04 AM   #38
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Posted by brokenolmarine: My wife bought me this Bridges Door Knob Marine Corps cane years ago at Busch Gardens as a Gift.

http://www.incrediblecanes.com/bridg...ickspage2.html
That's a really nice one, for anyone who has earned the right to carry it.

I have heavy duty canes made of blackthorn and ash, in most rooms and in the cars. I doubt that they will match up to that carbon fiber cane in strength.

Nor do they represent such honorable service....
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Old November 21, 2014, 08:49 AM   #39
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Bridges Door Knob Marine Corps cane
Semper Fi...
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Old November 21, 2014, 12:12 PM   #40
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I also believe that a cane requires a lot less training than a knife, and in the case of an assault out does, less than a firearm.
The first half of this sentence may be true, but I'd take issue with the second half.

The big drawback for muscle-powered weapons is that they require muscles -- and the muscle behind them must be trained what to do. Not simply 'taught' as in having read a few words on screen or even having done it once or twice, but trained in the sense of repeated practice leading to a reflex-speed series of actions under stress.

Being able to reliably whack a non-moving, non-resisting heavy bag with a cane isn't the same thing as being able to effectively use it in a scrum.

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Old November 21, 2014, 12:50 PM   #41
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Posted by pax: The big drawback for muscle-powered weapons is that they require muscles -- and the muscle behind them must be trained what to do. Not simply 'taught' as in having read a few words on screen or even having done it once or twice, but trained in the sense of repeated practice leading to a reflex-speed series of actions under stress.
I'll go along with that.

Quote:
Being able to reliably whack a non-moving, non-resisting heavy bag with a cane isn't the same thing as being able to effectively use it in a scrum.
Very true indeed.

So, the question in my minds is how to compare the amount of training needed to use a cane to defend oneself with the mount necessary to get rom "this is how to load the the magazine" to training one to draw while moving and fire rapidly with combat accuracy at a surprise attacker.

I don't have an objectively based opinion on that.
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Old November 21, 2014, 03:14 PM   #42
Bob Wright
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Be aware that in my state, Tennessee, your permit is for "handgun carry" and does not extend to knives, clubs, batons or baseball bats.

If you are carrying anything that can be construed as a weapon, you are in violation. And you're far better off with a gun.

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Old November 21, 2014, 05:54 PM   #43
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If you are carrying anything that can be construed as a weapon, you are in violation.
Many items can be "construed" as a weapon when they aren't CLASSIFIED as a weapon, hence carrying a "cane" instead of a "baton"

Anything can BE a weapon once it's used as such, but if it's justifiable defense, I'm not going to worry about what anyone "might" think
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