The Firing Line Forums

Go Back   The Firing Line Forums > The Skunkworks > Gear and Accessories

Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread
Old November 2, 2017, 04:29 AM   #1
TestedTwice
Member
 
Join Date: September 25, 2015
Posts: 37
Crack in leather holster seam? (pictures)

So I just picked up a $200 swivel holster from Tex Shoemaker before they went out of business. I noticed a long crack in the seam and wasn't sure if this was normal or not. I've only worn the holster twice with my revolver; the second time involved some intense running/bouncing of the holster. I'm not sure if it was there or not when it arrived. Does this look problematic? Here's a link with some pictures.

https://imgur.com/a/BXW38
TestedTwice is offline  
Old November 2, 2017, 05:06 AM   #2
TJB101
Senior Member
 
Join Date: January 2, 2017
Posts: 153
That’s a bummer... I would try to use a syringe and put in some wood glue and clamp it. Use a wet paper towel to remove squeeze out.
TJB101 is offline  
Old November 2, 2017, 07:23 AM   #3
LeverGunFan
Member
 
Join Date: August 25, 2007
Location: Indiana
Posts: 77
It may not be a problem if the stitching is still secure. If you decide to glue it, I suggest that you use a flexible glue such as used in the shoe repair industry. If you know a cobbler, they may be able to fix it, or you can purchase "Shoe Goo" at many department or hardware stores. Pliobond may work as well. As TJB101 noted, get the glue into the joint and clamp it overnight.
__________________
Support the Second Amendment Foundation!
LeverGunFan is offline  
Old November 2, 2017, 07:26 AM   #4
dahermit
Senior Member
 
Join Date: October 28, 2006
Location: South Central Michigan...near Ohio, Indiana.
Posts: 5,094
The stitching tension is pulling in on the leather causing the outward ends to spread. It is only of cosmetic concern. There are leather cement/glues available from Tandy Leather Co. that can be used. However, if it were mine and I could not abide the separation, I would fill the void with Black shoe polish, buff it and call it good.
dahermit is offline  
Old November 2, 2017, 08:44 AM   #5
smee78
Senior Member
 
Join Date: July 14, 2008
Location: South Carolina
Posts: 2,277
No problem as long as the stitching has not popped.
__________________
We know exactly where one cow with Mad-cow-disease is located, among the millions and millions of cows in America, but we haven't got a clue where thousands of illegal immigrants and terrorists are
smee78 is offline  
Old November 2, 2017, 12:10 PM   #6
Slopemeno
Senior Member
 
Join Date: January 19, 2007
Posts: 2,647
If you're going to try injecting a glue, try E-6000, Goop, or Shoe Goo. That stuff stays flexible for decades. Inject the glue, clamp it, and let it cure for 72 hours or so.
Slopemeno is offline  
Old November 2, 2017, 12:44 PM   #7
T. O'Heir
Senior Member
 
Join Date: February 13, 2002
Location: Canada
Posts: 8,676
"...put in some wood glue..." Nope. Contact or rubber cement and a clamp will fix that. Isn't anything to worry about though. It's just the leather drying. Means it wasn't glued correctly before sewing.
No shoe polish either. Shoe polish is mostly wax. That'll dry, crack and fall out.
"...involved some intense running/bouncing..." Means your belt isn't up to being a gun belt. That shouldn't cause any such issue though.
__________________
Spelling and grammar count!
T. O'Heir is offline  
Old November 2, 2017, 01:51 PM   #8
Pahoo
Senior Member
 
Join Date: February 16, 2006
Location: IOWA
Posts: 7,050
More than one way to skin this cat

Quote:
Does this look problematic?
Not really and there is more than one way to make this fix. I am a leather crafter and you do just what needs to fix it. It might be simple or get "slightly" involved. Kind of depends on defining what's going on. I would have a better idea if I could see the face of the holster. In the past, I have had to restitch a number of holsters. It's common for manufacturers to apply a lacquer finish coat/coats and they can cut into the stitching. .....

Can you tell if the stitching is still in sound and tight? ....

Be safe ...... !!!!
__________________
'Fundamental truths' are easy to recognize because they are verified daily through simple observation and thus, require no testing.
Pahoo is offline  
Old November 2, 2017, 03:00 PM   #9
TestedTwice
Member
 
Join Date: September 25, 2015
Posts: 37
Quote:
Originally Posted by Pahoo View Post
Not really and there is more than one way to make this fix. I am a leather crafter and you do just what needs to fix it. It might be simple or get "slightly" involved. Kind of depends on defining what's going on. I would have a better idea if I could see the face of the holster. In the past, I have had to restitch a number of holsters. It's common for manufacturers to apply a lacquer finish coat/coats and they can cut into the stitching. .....

Can you tell if the stitching is still in sound and tight? ....

Be safe ...... !!!!
Is this a good enough picture to see?

https://i.imgur.com/SDRHIrW.jpg
TestedTwice is offline  
Old November 2, 2017, 03:34 PM   #10
Pahoo
Senior Member
 
Join Date: February 16, 2006
Location: IOWA
Posts: 7,050
Sure is and I thank you. .....

Your "machine" stitching as well as the rest of the holster, appears to be sound.
For now, I'm throwing in with what dahermit replied.
With time, this crack will propagate down to the bottom area and in fact, I'm surprised it isn't already there.

By the way, that is great looking holster. The crack should be an easy fix and after applying the glue, I would clamp it, firmly but not tight. I sandwich the leather between to strips bamboo or plastic. Once the clamps are in place, remove any excess cement before it dries. Currently I'm using Loctite-Stik'n seal. Forget wood glues or standard rubber cement. ....

Be Safe !!!
__________________
'Fundamental truths' are easy to recognize because they are verified daily through simple observation and thus, require no testing.

Last edited by Pahoo; November 2, 2017 at 03:43 PM.
Pahoo is offline  
Old November 2, 2017, 04:52 PM   #11
TestedTwice
Member
 
Join Date: September 25, 2015
Posts: 37
Quote:
Originally Posted by Pahoo View Post
Sure is and I thank you. .....

Your "machine" stitching as well as the rest of the holster, appears to be sound.
For now, I'm throwing in with what dahermit replied.
With time, this crack will propagate down to the bottom area and in fact, I'm surprised it isn't already there.

By the way, that is great looking holster. The crack should be an easy fix and after applying the glue, I would clamp it, firmly but not tight. I sandwich the leather between to strips bamboo or plastic. Once the clamps are in place, remove any excess cement before it dries. Currently I'm using Loctite-Stik'n seal. Forget wood glues or standard rubber cement. ....

Be Safe !!!
I mean, I’m not worried about the cosmetics of the holster. It’s a great looking holster, but I’m expecting to wear it out pretty well. I’m just concerned about the crack turning into a complete separation and destroying the holster’s ability to even hold a gun; much less being rough with it. Will the stitching hold if I decide not to glue it, or should I just throw some cement/glue in there?
TestedTwice is offline  
Old November 2, 2017, 08:55 PM   #12
Pahoo
Senior Member
 
Join Date: February 16, 2006
Location: IOWA
Posts: 7,050
Cement the crack

Quote:
Will the stitching hold if I decide not to glue it, or should I just throw some cement/glue in there?
I see no reason why the stitching will not hold. However, it would be best to glue the edges down and this will add to it's strength and appearance. .....

Kind of like having gorgeous girlfriend with a wart on her nose. She may be a beauty but that wart is always there. ....

Apply the cement as deep as you can, rather than throwing it in there ....

Be Safe !!!
__________________
'Fundamental truths' are easy to recognize because they are verified daily through simple observation and thus, require no testing.
Pahoo is offline  
Old November 2, 2017, 09:53 PM   #13
TestedTwice
Member
 
Join Date: September 25, 2015
Posts: 37
Quote:
Originally Posted by Pahoo View Post
I see no reason why the stitching will not hold. However, it would be best to glue the edges down and this will add to it's strength and appearance. .....

Kind of like having gorgeous girlfriend with a wart on her nose. She may be a beauty but that wart is always there. ....

Apply the cement as deep as you can, rather than throwing it in there ....

Be Safe !!!
Alright, so I apologize for all the questions..... You mentioned Loctite Stick and seal? Where can I find this? Walmart? What are the benefits over rubber cement/glue? How do I clamp it together? Just C-clamps and couple strips of plastic/wood to protect the leather? Sorry if I sound like a complete moron; I just don't want to use anything but the best to save my $200 holster. Lol. I really appreciate the help you have all given on this topic! I asked this question on another social platform and got a bunch of "leather holsters suck" responses.
TestedTwice is offline  
Old November 3, 2017, 10:39 AM   #14
Pahoo
Senior Member
 
Join Date: February 16, 2006
Location: IOWA
Posts: 7,050
Slow and easy, wins this race !!!

Quote:
Alright, so I apologize for all the questions..... You mentioned Loctite Stick and seal? Where can I find this? Walmart?
You know, I've had this tube for a long time and yes, I think I got it at Walmart.

Quote:
Slopemeno
If you're going to try injecting a glue, try E-6000, Goop, or Shoe Goo.
I would have no problem with any of these cements and one positive attribute is being water-proof and they really hold. the standard rubber cement is just too week. I know that Walmart sells the E-6000, in the craft section. I do not use metal C-Clamps, I use clips, ratcheting small clamps that have rubber feet. I there are times when I even use clothes pins. You don't need to get heavy handed on clamping. .......

Be Safe !!!
__________________
'Fundamental truths' are easy to recognize because they are verified daily through simple observation and thus, require no testing.
Pahoo is offline  
Old November 4, 2017, 06:51 PM   #15
Slopemeno
Senior Member
 
Join Date: January 19, 2007
Posts: 2,647
I have a nice drop point fixed blade and the sheath stitching was starting to come apart, so I shot some clear E-6000 in there and clamped it. It's still holding nicely a couple of years later. That glue is really amazing stuff.
Slopemeno is offline  
Reply

Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off

Forum Jump


All times are GMT -5. The time now is 05:55 AM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.7
Copyright ©2000 - 2017, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.
This site and contents, including all posts, Copyright © 1998-2017 S.W.A.T. Magazine
Copyright Complaints: Please direct DMCA Takedown Notices to the registered agent: thefiringline.com
Contact Us
Page generated in 0.10721 seconds with 8 queries