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Old May 28, 2020, 08:19 PM   #26
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- And yes, it functions out of a standard AR action.

What's not to like?
That it functions out of a standard AR action!

Not that there's anything actually wrong with that, tis just I don't especially like ARs and won't be carrying one where a regular sporting rifle (including a single shot) will do what I want done.

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However, their data doesn't make sense to me as they show a load with a 158grn Hornady XTP bullet out of a 10" pistol barrel, max load of 21.0grns of H110, producing 1,604fps.
The problem is when you compare that to their 357Mag data using the same powder and bullet: 158grn Hornady XTP bullet out of a 10" pistol barrel, max load of 16.7grns of H110, producing 1,591fps, they show that the Bains Davis rd only produces a 13fps increase with 4.3grns more H110 powder.
Something doesn't seem right about their data
There are only two possibilities, they made a mistake, or they didn't. IF they made a mistake, you have to figure out, where, and what. Maybe the velocity data for one of the loads was wrong. or a typo..or the powder charge, or....etc

OR they didn't make a mistake, and if not, then why so close? MAYBE their .357/44 barrel is "slow" and their .357 mag barrel is "fast". It does happen...

Considering some other cartridges that approximate the Bain & Davis (a .44 case necked to .357) the .357 AMP and its virtual twin the .357 Grizzly win mag have significantly higher published speed from a 20+gr charge of H110 from a 10" barrel with a 158 slug, I'd think Hodgdon's web site data to be suspect.
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Old May 31, 2020, 07:07 PM   #27
TRX
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> The reason is .35 Remington,

Maybe, but .35 Remington has been discontinued and brought back a couple of times already.

While the .35 has sold slowly but steadily in the USA, it's fairly popular in the Old World. Valmet in Finland and Izshevsk in Russia have both produced civilian-model, Kalashnikov-pattern rifles in .35 Remington. The caliber is highly favored by hunters who want meat instead of trophies; like someone said once, "I want to eat it, not blow it up!"

The .357 Maximum is about half an inch shorter than the .38-55. While changing cartridge lengths is more difficult on a tube magazine than a box, the differences are mostly in the lifter mechanism.

I don't know... leverguns tend to occupy the premium-price bracket (at least compared to the kind of bolt-action rifles I usually look at), and buyers seem to trend heavily toward "classic caliber" buyers and cowboy-action shooters. The classic guys wouldn't want a Maximum, and the cowboy guys couldn't use it in competition.

While I'm aware that there are hunters who use leverguns, they're basically not-a-thing in my area.
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Old June 1, 2020, 01:26 PM   #28
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While I'm aware that there are hunters who use leverguns, they're basically not-a-thing in my area.
Or maybe they're not a thing, now. What about a generation ago, or two??

A lot depends on where you are, and when. Hunted deer and bear in the Adirondacks until I went in the Army in 75. About 8 out of 10 deer rifles carried by my Dad and his hunting buddies were lever guns. And this pretty much held true for everyone we met. Winchester, Marlin, and Savage ruled.

After I got out of the Army, I noticed that the lever gun's rule had declined a bit, now being down to 6-7 out of 10, more or less.

I never head of the .35 Rem being actually discontinued, though for a long spell the only new rifles you could get in .35Rem were Marlin 336s.

I can tell you that a .357 Maximum carbine wouldn't have been all that popular with the group I grew up hunting with. Generally, if you were going to carry a .35 you got a .35Rem (Marlin rifle) and they wouldn't have bothered with a smaller .35 round.

The .357 Max was designed for a bit more punch shooting steel rams, and it's never found another good niche. It's not a bad round, but with hugely popular rounds common on both side of it's power, the Max never got a firm footing in the game fields.
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Old June 1, 2020, 07:28 PM   #29
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Quote:
I'd think Hodgdon's web site data to be suspect.
I also take their data with a grain of salt--or at least a grain of quickload second opinion.
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