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Old February 1, 2016, 09:36 AM   #1
MWalsh
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How make Mossberg 500 better for trap?

I have a 500 with a 28" ported barrel.

I know most people use dedicated trap guns but spending that money is out of the question right now, and I know I can build my skill up even if ultimately the gun is holding me back. My second time out last weekend I got 21/25, which I am pretty happy with for being so new to it.

Main thing I'm looking for currently is recoil reduction. I was using 3 DE shells, so a guy there said most of them use 2 3/4. I've purchased a bunch of those to reduce recoil a little. Next up, though, I have only the default rubber pad. I'm going to grab either a limb saver sleeve recoil pad, or just replace the one on there now entirely with a 1" rubber recoil pad.

But, I'm also wondering if there is any cheap way to raise the weight on this to reduce recoil further (without duct taping fishing lures to it)?

Any other ideas? This must be done on the super cheap
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Old February 1, 2016, 09:42 AM   #2
jaguarxk120
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You can add weight inside the stock bolt hole and weights inside the magazine tube.

Be careful to add weights so the gun will balance as it does now.
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Old February 1, 2016, 10:22 AM   #3
243winxb
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Make sure the weight can not move under recoil. It works for a wood stock, dont know about plastic?? Add weight inside the stock bolt hole. Do not add inside the magazine tube, seen it do damage to a Win. M12. For trap, put a pad on the stock to make pattern shoot higher.
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Old February 1, 2016, 10:25 AM   #4
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If you're shooting doubles, don't forget to pump.
Part of the reason for the recoil is the shape of the stock.
Trap guns have stock specific designs, due to the loads required to get out there.
Different even than the other shotgun games.
They're straighter.
Maybe someone makes a suitable trap type stock for your 500.
If yours has a wooden stock, there's not much room for adding internal weight, not like a hollow synthetic.
But every little bit helps.
For more recoil protection, you can wear a padded shoulder pad, in addition to installing a good recoil pad, too.
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Old February 1, 2016, 10:40 AM   #5
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I am fairly sure it's a real wood stock (I think modern 500's have real wood?).

Magazine tube weight seems like a great spot, but not if there is any potential for damage.

What about barrel weights? I read about them online but can't find them anywhere. I picture something that clamps around the barrel.
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Old February 1, 2016, 11:27 AM   #6
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Weight added to the front may cause the gun to be a real beast.
Like jaguarxk120 said, the balance could be badly effected and ruin your game.
If you're hitting as well as you say, that's not something you would want to reverse.

Check with the other folks there and see what ammo they're using.
Also check with the power factor show for their shotgun games episodes.
There's lots of discussion about lower recoiling ammo for trap.
Using less punishing rounds is probably the easiest way to deal with recoil.

Or you could switch games and use what you have for skeet and sporting clays.
The low recoiling target loads work very well there, as does the 500.
My preference for store bought is Winchester Low Noise, Low Recoil.
Very comfy over a long day of shotgunning.
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Last edited by g.willikers; February 1, 2016 at 11:37 AM.
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Old February 1, 2016, 12:18 PM   #7
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While stated for an O/U, you might make one of these work:
http://www.jimsearneye.com/ez-catalog/X339988/5

Fit is critical, not only to successfully hitting the targets, also to reduce recoil. 7/8 or 1 oz @ 1200 will break any 16 yard trap target. No need for shoulder thumpers. There's nothing macho about shooting heavy fast loads that lead to flinches and physical injuries over time. Recoil damage is a cumulative thing.
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Old February 1, 2016, 01:07 PM   #8
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physical injuries over time. Recoil damage is a cumulative thing.
Speaking of which, what injuries are statistically correlated with target shooting of this nature? The head gets a little shake every time there is a shot, if it's rested on the cheek pad, and the shoulder takes a hit every time as well. Do long term trap or skeet shooters have higher rates of shoulder injuries?
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Old February 1, 2016, 01:49 PM   #9
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Not only shoulder and neck problems, but retina ones, too.
That's the scary one.
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Old February 1, 2016, 03:12 PM   #10
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A 28" ported 12 gauge shouldn't have a great deal of felt recoil.
Like g.willikers says, the easiest, least expensive way to reduce the felt recoil is to use target loads. If you change the recoil pad remember that you'll likely have to adjust the LOP too.
That's not really a big deal. If the 1" pad is thicker than the current pad, you just cut off the difference with a mitre saw or box. Way easier to do than describe. Masking tape on the measured cut line and cut through the tape.
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Old February 1, 2016, 04:05 PM   #11
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Quote:
A 28" ported 12 gauge shouldn't have a great deal of felt recoil.
Why not? Porting does nothing to relieve recoil. A pump transmits all recoil to the shoulder; most don't seem to fit a lot of folks very well - they tend to try and fit themselves to the gun versus the other way around. And some pumps can be lighter.
Trap models are built heavier for a few reasons - to help smooth out the swing and to help mitigate recoil.

Quote:
Not only shoulder and neck problems, but retina ones, too.
That's the scary one.
Absolutely; trap and skeet meets are almost more of an durance event and shooting heavy and hot trap loads (not necessary but they do) is why you see a lot of older trap guys using release triggers. Their flinches due to recoil anticipation have left them no option.
What works? A HEAVY gun - 9#+, LIGHT loads, and a stock that FITS.
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Old February 1, 2016, 04:26 PM   #12
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Having suffered an overuse injury from another sport, I'm super gunshy about getting into anything that can hurt me. Is there anywhere else I could go to read about repetitive use injuries with this activity? e.g. is retina damage or similar something that affects a substantial number of long gun shooters or what? I imagine if I get into this properly I'll drop the money on a better suited gun, but I planned on keeping this one for at least a while first.

Seems like the 1 1/8 oz 2 3/4 dr shells I have may even be a bit too much. I'm reading a lot of people are down to 7/8 oz, though I know that would be more demanding on accuracy.

EDIT: Took the butt stock pad off. The bolt hole is big enough for three shells to fit in it. I think if I can fill that up with shot I should be able to add around 6 ounces into the stock without any additional drilling around.

Last edited by MWalsh; February 1, 2016 at 05:08 PM.
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Old February 1, 2016, 09:38 PM   #13
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You will be better off taking empty hulls and completely filling them with lead and adding some in the mag tube where the plug would be.

You want weight AND balance. Just adding weight to the stock will make the gun barrel feel whippy which is not conducive to a smooth swing.
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Old February 1, 2016, 10:40 PM   #14
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I have a couple of these barrel weights. http://www.briley.com/c-430-all-models.aspx
Actually got them for a lightweight single shot, but they also fit on my Mossberg 500. As others have said, too much weight in one spot can mess up the balance if you don't have counterweights other places.

Odd as it may look at a trap field, you might even consider adding a side saddle to the gun and keeping shells in it while shooting. 5 shells will add about half a pound and will keep the weight centered.

Then maybe try a small barrel weight and some lead weights in the buttstock (or maybe a leather stock warp which would raise the comb AND add weight).

If you are interested in the barrel weight idea, you could PM me. I've got a 6 oz. and 10 oz. version and would be willing to part with one for less than new ones cost.
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Old February 2, 2016, 04:58 AM   #15
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If you're serious about adding weight to the gun yes you can fill up the stock with heavy metal and drill additional holes to add more weight. The 500 stocks are so cheap that I think you can get replacements for $15 at gunpartsco.

For a front weight I might suggest that you make something. There should be a hole in the barrel take down bolt facing forward. You can easily find the right bolt for that and add a bit of weight. If you know someone with a welder and a lathe you could make a custom weight extension once you know how much weight you want.
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Old February 2, 2016, 08:43 AM   #16
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Try Amazon.com for bolt on parts. There are flashlight mounts the mall nija's

screw on to their HD guns. Just remember when adding any weight to the gun you want to keep a balance, if the butt stock is too heavy you might start shooting high.
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Old February 2, 2016, 11:01 AM   #17
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I use my Mossberg 500 for trap all the time. To help with the recoil, I started loading my own softer loads. I can load stuff that is much softer than any factory shell.
1 oz loads at 1150 fps (or lower) are a revelation when it comes to recoil. The clays break just as easily.
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Old February 2, 2016, 11:14 AM   #18
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Light loads

And the most expensive ongoing expense for trap is your shot if you shoot a lot.

The beauty of 1 oz is of course reduced recoil, and reduced cost. A 25 lb. bag of shot goes farther when you are loading them @ 1 oz.

I can't attribute any of my misses to "only" having 1 oz. of shot. I shoot mostly from the 16.

Save the "thumpers" for the 27 and games. I have yet to try 7/8 but my friends at the club say it's no different.

Of course if it's money on the line.......
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Old February 2, 2016, 11:55 AM   #19
MWalsh
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Quote:
Odd as it may look at a trap field, you might even consider adding a side saddle to the gun and keeping shells in it while shooting.
Had not thought of this and it would keep balance pretty good.

Tonight I am going to attempt (with eye protection outside of course) to melt some shot into some molds the same size as shotgun shells (better density than just filling them with shot). I should be able to come up with about 3 ounces per, if I keep them as pure lead cylinders.

Once I'm through this box of shot I bought I will see if I can find some 1 oz or even 7/8.

Idea about using the barrel screw hole to join a weight to that is a good one. i recall seeing similar online now that I think about it!
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Old February 2, 2016, 12:08 PM   #20
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Quote:
1 oz loads at 1150 fps (or lower) are a revelation when it comes to recoil.
Quote:
he beauty of 1 oz is of course reduced recoil, and reduced cost. A 25 lb. bag of shot goes farther when you are loading them @ 1 oz.
1oz gives you 400 rounds from a bag of shot. 3/4oz gives you 533, or 5 boxes more, from the same bag. Go one .005 constriction tighter and run them about 1250 to 1300 and watch the targets disappear.

I reload 3/4 now for both 12 and 20; easy on the shoulder and wallet.
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Old February 2, 2016, 07:09 PM   #21
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FITASC, I am absolutely going to try 3/4 oz loads once I run through my supply of 1 oz wads.
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Old February 2, 2016, 10:02 PM   #22
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Neoprene cheek pad
Better recoil pad.
Drill some holes and fill with lead.
Load a shell or two completely full of lead and keep them in the tube.

Problem is, by the time you do all this stuff you have some decent time and money into it. These accessories are pretty much useless whether you continue to shoot trap and get a better gun or stop all together. You can buy a used gun and resell it for less of a loss IMO.
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Old February 2, 2016, 10:07 PM   #23
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Neoprene cheek pad
This only works if you need a higher comb; if you don't, you'll be shooting high and over targets.
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Old February 3, 2016, 04:02 PM   #24
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On the light straighter stock guns the repetitive recoil into your cheek can be somewhat punishing in and of itself and cause a flinch. The neoprene will help with that a little. It will change your cheek weld, but I would be surprised if it made your shooting worse as the mossberg should come from the factory get so the pattern is more or less under the bead. Most trap shooters want the pattern just above the bead for a hold similar to "sub-six."

Like I said, I'd look for a used low-end gun, like a Stoeger trap, and plan to sell it if you upgrade or get out.
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Old February 5, 2016, 10:49 AM   #25
MWalsh
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Not saying I won't get a trapgun, but this week I worked on the attached.

1) Replaced hard rubber recoil pad with $25 Limbsaver pad. Reduced weight almost an ounce, but it's way softer
2) Added almost 15 oz to the stock for a net increase in gun weight of 14 oz.



For the stock weight I found that 3/4" steel tube from home depot fit beautifully in the hole (shotgun shells actually do not--just a touch too wide). I then emptied the shot from a bunch of cheap target loads.

I taped the end of the steel tube with foil tape I had on hand, standing it on one end. Took a tuna can, bent one edge to make it sharper for pouring, put a bunch of the lead shot into it, and took a propane torch to it (outside!). The shot readily melted and poured into the tube. The reason I melted the lead is that spheres in a space only fill up around 2/3rd of the available area and I wanted maximum density.

Haven't tried it yet but it's only pulled the center of gravity of the gun back around 1.5". It feels noticeably heavier and I think combined with the pad should work well.

If I want more recoil reduction I will attach some weights further forward. Even if I only use it for slugs down the line the extra weight and pad should make shooting them a better experience.
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