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Old January 18, 2020, 12:42 AM   #1
jag2
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Glossy wood

I see pics of wood stocks with a glossy/shiny finish that someone has added. What is the most common, I'm guessing varnish? How can it be removed with minimal damage to the original finish? I have a Win '92 with some and see a Remington pump that I'm interested in but the finish bothers me. I'm not very handy when it comes to wood finish so I'm afraid to experiment without some guidance. Thanks.
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Old January 18, 2020, 02:04 AM   #2
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Sometimes the hardest step is the first one. Watch a couple of youtube videos, get the old finish stripped, sand very lightly with very fine sandpaper, or a very fine sanding sponge. Then, wipe on a finish if you like, then grab a can of simple Formby's Tung Oil, and start rubbing in coats of it not letting it run, pool, drip, etc. Go slow and stop when it looks like you want it to.

You may be looking for a more refined approach, but doing it as above, it's not permanent. You can start over as your skills improve. For some reason, and I may have read into your post, but it seems you're more of a 'function' over 'form' kinda guy who doesn't need the prettiest firearms in camp.
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Old January 18, 2020, 03:11 PM   #3
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The usual "glossy" finish pepople add is TruOil or a similar product (there are many). You can shine up an old stock in a hurry just by adding a coat, you can refinish a stock by stripping and building up coats of finish, whichever you want. Not that it's the best finish, it's just the most common one since it is available just about everywhere they sell gun stuff.
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Old January 18, 2020, 03:32 PM   #4
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Just go over the stock lightly with 0000 steel wool. This will dull the shiny finish.
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Old January 18, 2020, 03:51 PM   #5
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You may not need brain surgery for this headache.

Quote:
I'm interested in but the finish bothers me.
jag2

What I am interpreting, from your post, is that the finish is sound but you just don't like the "glossy" look and neither do I. ……

If so, for starters, Lightly buff it with 0000 steel wool. This will give it more of a satin finish. Take care not to work the high spots and sharper edges, too hard. Then I follow up with a light polishing, using shoe past wax or any carnauba base wax. …..

I refinish a number of stocks, using Tru-Oil and after I let the last coat, age awhile, I use this satining technique. Try it yourself and if you still don't like it, you can go from there. A number of years ago, I contacted Birchwood Casey, inquiring about the availability of a Semi-Gloss product and they said they were working on it. So far, no luck. … "crickets"
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Old January 20, 2020, 09:34 AM   #6
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FULLERPLAST CLEAR was an old standby for gun-stocks, especially wetland guns, that would be out in bad weather, and damp/wet duck blinds, and it was really glossy! Fuller in Fullerplast likely refers to Fuller who still makes surficants and additives for paint manufacturers now, but no longer sells any consumer products. They also made a milky white Fullerplast that was used on early Fender guitars, which is why you see an off white under the finish that has worn off old Fender Stratocaster. model guitars. The stuff was super ultra tough! Now we have very tough polyesters and polyurethanes. Fender uses a polyester now that has to be stripped with a heat gun. If you want a nice satin finish, go to the grocery store and buy some SCOTCHBRITE PADS, (THE GREEN ONES). Cut them down into large SQUARES, and poke a hole in the middle. Go buy a 3 or 4 inch bolt, two fender washers, and two nuts. Put one fender washer on the bolt. Stick the Scothbrite onto the bolt. Put the other fender washer on the bolt and sandwich the Scotchbrite square between the two washers. Now run the nut down and tighten it up. Now you have a Scotchbrite abrasive wheel. Put than in an electric drill, and run that over the wood parts on your gun, and you will have a super nice satin finish on the wood. I redid a 1860s Ethan Allen 22 Rimfire Derringer's brass frame with Scotchbrite and it looked gorgeous. I originally ran Scotchbrite and then jeweler's rouge and brought that brass up to a fine mirrored shine polish, but it reflected all the darkness indoors and just did not look nearly as nice as a fresh satin finished brass. I need a trigger return spring for that Derringer style pistol now. Oh yes it will work again. I am NOT a fan of steel wool on guns, and steel wool is banned from my workshop, as I do repairs on guns, guitars and electronics. Steel wool breaks down as you use it and it gets into everything. With electric guitars and speakers, it sticks to the magnets and ruins them, so it has been relegated to outdoor use only. If someone added a gloss finish later, it's probably varnish or gloss polyurethane. Buff it to a satin finish with some non-metallic abrasive pads. I don't want steel wool in the action of any of my guns either. That stuff gets EVERYWHERE you don't want is as you use it. IF YOU STRIP IT: If chemical stripper does not work, you will need a heat gun. Take the wood off the action, please. Good luck, God bless, safe travels and safe shooting. The Weekend Furniture Re-finisher is a good little book. If you have checkering, that will add some difficulty.
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Old January 20, 2020, 09:44 AM   #7
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Most of the high gloss wood finishes are a polyurethane. It is basically a clear plastic coating over the wood. It used to be pretty common on Remington and Weatherby firearms. It is not as popular as it used to be. Most people prefer the more subdued look.

It is possible to rub the wood down with a very fine steel wool to knock some of the shine off without completely removing the finish. Go slow, the more you rub, the more finish you remove. If you get down to bare wood then it will need to be refinished.
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Old January 20, 2020, 11:30 AM   #8
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Thanks for all the replies. To 10-96, I do like good function but in this case form is more important. I have a display featuring four 1892 Wins, all over 100 years old. This one is kind of the stinker, the others are in great condition so I would like it to look more "original" to match the others. This particular rifle was one of the earlier purchases and since then I have kind of raised my standards but it is still a nice gun and was at a good price. One thought has popped up, I think I will remove the stock and take it to a woodworking shop I've been to before and see what they suggest.
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Old January 20, 2020, 12:11 PM   #9
Don Fischer
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Bill DeShivs View Post
Just go over the stock lightly with 0000 steel wool. This will dull the shiny finish.
0000 steel wool and boiled linseed oil is what i use. Don't like shiny stocks.
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Old January 20, 2020, 02:23 PM   #10
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Glossy wood on a factory stock, especially Remingtons, is usually polyurethane. As in plastic. Nothing helps it as it gets into the pores of the wood and is very difficult to get completely off. 0000 steel wool just gives it ugly scratches.
Varnish would be fairly easy to get off with regular varnish remover. Remember that with the varnish gone, you have bare wood that suck moisture like a sponge.
"...a glossy/shiny finish that someone has added..." Is the result of hours and literally days of hand rubbing in oil. Usually pure tung oil for a gloss finish. Same as refinishing fine furniture.
Tru-Oil is a commercial tung oil based DIY finish similar to Tung Oil Finish sold by companies like MinWax. It's tung oil with hardeners and drying agents.
Boiled linseed oil, aka BLO, gives a flat finish. Doesn't last as well as other oils.
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Old January 20, 2020, 02:59 PM   #11
Bill DeShivs
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"Glossy wood on a factory stock, especially Remingtons, is usually polyurethane. As in plastic. Nothing helps it as it gets into the pores of the wood and is very difficult to get completely off. 0000 steel wool just gives it ugly scratches."

Only if you are an idiot.
Used properly, 0000 steel wool will give you a nice, satin finish.
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Old January 20, 2020, 03:50 PM   #12
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Exactly

Quote:
Used properly, 0000 steel wool will give you a nice, satin finish.
Exactly and while the 0000 does leave "light" scratches to break up the light, you will not notice it and an application of wax, will not only retain the satin finish but protect the stock. …..

Hey,
If you have concerns about wrecking the finish then just try it on a non-critical spot or you can send it off like you said. ……

In reverse
Have you ever seen a stock that shows a higher gloss, where it comes in contact with your hand? With time, the surface of your hand, actually polishes the finish. I had a browning that had a glossy finish and there were a number of light, "visible" scratches. Again, I worked it lightly wish plastic polish and this took "Most" of the scratches off...…

Be Safe !!!
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Old February 3, 2020, 02:01 PM   #13
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To break the shine on the stocks surface, I prefer to wet sand the surface using #1200 wet-or-dry emery paper and a rubber sanding block using the same finish that I sealed the stock wood with. Works like this:





Wipe off the slight slurry left behind with a sheet of Bounty paper toweling and there will be no silver slivers left behind.
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Old February 3, 2020, 05:37 PM   #14
Bill DeShivs
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Used on a dry finish, 0000 steel wool leaves no fibers that can't be wiped off.
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Old February 3, 2020, 09:04 PM   #15
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I like the high gloss stocks, that is one of the things I look for when I buy !!!!
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Old February 11, 2020, 12:47 PM   #16
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I have customers who also like a nice, hard, shiny finish, especially on trap & skeet shotguns. To get that type of finish I spray the stock with a lacquer and rotate the stock in my spray booth using a rotisserie set-up. With that sort of finish, the finish will take any of the bumps or scratches, and those are then easily repaired with extra fine emery paper and a rubber backing block, without any steel wool slivers becoming captured in the finish. I save the #0000 steel wool for "rust bluing" jobs.
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