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Old December 22, 2019, 05:27 PM   #1
Wruss00
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Question on buying .357 ammo when under 21

I was recently given a Henry Big Boy .357 lever-rifle and I absolutely love shooting it. I was given about 100 cartridges with it but those are starting to run low. I know from previous experience that many stores won’t sell pistol ammo to anyone under 21 (I am currently 19) even though here in Oklahoma you can legally own a pistol at 18 (but not buy from an FFL dealer). I know they make rifle specific .357 rounds but I just know inexperienced cashiers will look at the box, see .357 and assume it’s meant for a pistol. Anyone have any tips for getting some more rounds for what is probably my favorite firearm? I could ask my dad or a friend who is 21 but that’s kind of inconvenient especially considering that I live by myself. Thanks for any help you can provide!!

Last edited by Wruss00; December 22, 2019 at 07:00 PM.
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Old December 22, 2019, 06:06 PM   #2
NoSecondBest
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I' not aware of any rifle specific rounds sold as factory ammo in .357mag. Here in NY they ask you if the ammo is for a handgun and if you say no, you get it. If that doesn't work where you are, just have someone buy it for you. I'll bet there's no law in your state about anyone giving you ammo.
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Old December 22, 2019, 06:28 PM   #3
JohnKSa
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There may be some .357Mag loadings tailored more for rifles, but no one, to my knowledge, makes .357Mag ammo that is rifle-specific.

When you purchase the ammunition, the seller may ask you if it's for a rifle or handgun. Just answer honestly and there shouldn't be a problem. If no one asks, don't bother volunteering any information; you're not breaking any federal laws.

If they won't sell it to you even after you've told them it's for a rifle, I wouldn't make an issue of it--life is too short. Just find another store.

If you can't get anyone in your area to sell to you, it's legal for you to get someone else to buy it for you. There are no straw purchase laws for ammunition sales.

Finally, you can probably buy ammo on line. Here's an online ammo seller I've used in the past with good success.

https://www.sgammo.com/catalog/pisto...57-magnum-ammo

Keep in mind that there is at least one region in the U.S. where you must be 21 to purchase/possess ammunition of any kind. It's hard to know the laws everywhere, so you should be aware that it's possible you may not be able to legally buy any ammo under the local laws of your area.

I'm only talking about federal law in this post. If you post your general location, someone may be able to chime in with any pertinent laws for your specific area.
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Old December 22, 2019, 06:35 PM   #4
American Man
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https://www.hornady.com/ammunition/h...erevolution#!/

Just get someone older in your family to order some online. But if you are in one of those miserable states, they might not deliver to your state. Good luck.
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Old December 23, 2019, 05:46 AM   #5
Hal
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Start handloading.
It's a great way to get into shooting more & using better ammo & not having to worry about things like outages and not being able to buy it...


Plus - you'll discover you can load and shoot .38 spl in the lever gun for a whole lot less than the .357 mag stuff.
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Old December 23, 2019, 07:36 AM   #6
buck460XVR
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Hal View Post
Start handloading.
It's a great way to get into shooting more & using better ammo & not having to worry about things like outages and not being able to buy it...


Plus - you'll discover you can load and shoot .38 spl in the lever gun for a whole lot less than the .357 mag stuff.
While I agree about the suggestion of learning to handload, I have to say, I see very little in the difference between the cost of handloading .38 vs .357. Primers and projectiles of similar weight cost the same. Same with cost of brass....very similar. With my .357 levers, I stick with .357 brass, even with .38 type loads, just for sure feeding. Powder cost savings due to smaller charges with .38 cases will be minimal.
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Old December 23, 2019, 08:44 AM   #7
gbclarkson
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Hornady has a LeveRevolution (or something like this) line of pistol ammo optimized for level action rifles. You could point to the "Lever" on the box and explain that the ammo is not for a revolver... maybe...

Welcome to the forum.
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Old December 23, 2019, 09:40 AM   #8
Hal
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Quote:
I see very little in the difference between the cost of handloading .38 vs .357.
Only in the acquisition of the brass is there substantial cost difference.
I'm not sure how available "shoot em up" .357 mag ammo is - while .38 spl is pretty available.

Also - .38 spl seems to feed better in my Marlin Cowboy II than .357 mag.
The round nose stuff is fine in both, but, the semi wad cutter can hang up a bit.
Overall - I seem to recall better feeding w/.38 spl.
I'll have to recheck my notes to see. It's been a couple decades since I had the Marlin out.

Also - also - .38 spl loads tend to run w/out any leading in my Marlin - same round nose lead bullets in .357 - not so much.
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Old December 23, 2019, 06:14 PM   #9
langenc
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Get family member to buy for you bet resolution of problem.

The suggestion about reloading is good but quite expensive to get started.
Need dies, press, scale, blocks. But components will save you esp if you can shoot some cast bullets..
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Old December 23, 2019, 07:28 PM   #10
Aguila Blanca
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Quote:
Originally Posted by langenc
The suggestion about reloading is good but quite expensive to get started.
Need dies, press, scale, blocks. But components will save you esp if you can shoot some cast bullets.
It doesn't need to be super expensive to get started. You can get a Lee Turret Press kit for around $135, and the kit includes a scale and Lee's Autodisk powder measure. Add a set of dies and either on-press or off-press priming, and you can be ready to go for $200 or less. It doesn't take a lot of rounds to pay that off.

https://www.titanreloading.com/lee-p...rret-press-kit

No, the Turret Press isn't a full progressive and it won't churn out 500 rounds in an hour. It can easily do 100 or more rounds per hour (Lee claims up to 200, but after using mine for many years I don't think that's possible).
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Old December 24, 2019, 11:25 PM   #11
44 AMP
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You can start handloading way cheaper, but much more labor intensive with the Lee "wack a mole" Loader. Not sure if they're still around (haven't looked) but they made them for generations so I'm sure you can find a set Internet or somewhere.

It takes a lot of time, and some effort, per round but its cheaper than a press set up. Don't know anyone who started with the Lee Loader that stayed with it when they could afford better tools though...still you can get started cheaper than a couple hundred bucks, even today.

Stores in your area SHOULD sell you "pistol" ammo for your rifle the same way they sell .22LR.

If they don't they're using a double standard.
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Old December 25, 2019, 05:00 PM   #12
P-man
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Available in BOTH .38 Special and .357 Magnum.
https://leeprecision.com/classic-lee-loader/

At Midwayusa
https://www.midwayusa.com/product/1012833230

Last edited by P-man; December 25, 2019 at 05:08 PM.
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Old December 26, 2019, 09:20 AM   #13
GE-Minigun
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Just tell them it's for a rifle, if they won't sell it to you go to the next store. I did that for years when I had a 44 carbine
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Old December 29, 2019, 08:08 PM   #14
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Another vote for taking up reloading, here.
I paid $25 for an old Lyman Spartan reloading press at a gun-show and have continued to use it for the last 22 years. No doubt there are better presses, but this one simply works and I have not felt the need to upgrade.
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