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Old January 22, 2020, 03:30 PM   #1
senecahornet
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Accurate arms magnum mr-8700 powder

I use to reload for my .338win rifle. Sold it awhile back.
What other magnum calibre rifle would use this powder?
Where is a good place to find reloading data?
Trying to sell 8 pounds of this powder and i would like to provide some interest in it.
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Old January 22, 2020, 04:13 PM   #2
BBarn
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As you may be aware, the powder has been out of production for several years. Best source of data may be the older Accurate Powder booklets, and perhaps a few older bullet reloading manuals. You might find some PDF copies of the older Accurate booklets with a Google search.

Edit:. Looks like Accurate provided data for many of the belted magnum calibers and some of the long action bottleneck calibers (30-06 family).

Last edited by BBarn; January 22, 2020 at 04:22 PM.
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Old January 22, 2020, 05:27 PM   #3
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You want to check the powder is still in good shape. Some of the obsolete Accurate powders, like an unopened pound of 3100 I had, have consumed their stabilizer and started to break down. That's not to say your 8700 is one of them, but just to check.
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Old January 23, 2020, 09:30 AM   #4
senecahornet
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Thank you for your replies

Yes the powder is like new. I stored it in a dry basement over the years.
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Old January 23, 2020, 09:34 AM   #5
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It should do well in the .338 LaPua and cartridges of similar design.

IIRC, this is the AAC version of H870. Someone please correct me if that is mistaken,\.
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Old January 23, 2020, 09:43 AM   #6
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There is load data out there for magnum cartridges from 7mm Rem. Mag. on up. Very slow burning, so you will use a lot of powder.

Don
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Old January 24, 2020, 02:41 PM   #7
Unclenick
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Quote:
Originally Posted by senecahornet
Yes the powder is like new. I stored it in a dry basement over the years.
That's how I stored my 3100: a sealed container in dry basement.

Time is all it takes to leads to eventually breakdown. For that reason, the military puts limits on how long they will stockpile a powder or munitions loaded with it. 20 years for double-base powders and 45-years for single-base powders in the proper temperature range in storage bunkers. Mind you, those are bulk powders, so the lot age is uniform. But bulk powders have wider burn rate variation than is acceptable for fixed-weight load data. It can have variation because bulk powder users have pressure guns to adjust loads with. But the average handloader relies on databooks and can't confirm pressure. To overcome that, cannister grade powders sold for handloading are typically blended with other, older lots that had previously been identified as slower or faster bulk lots of the same type of powder. The blending is done with whichever of the older powders is needed to adjust the burn rate of the latest lot to qualify it as close enough to the nominal burn rate to be used with databook recipes. That's very convenient for handloaders, but it means you have no idea how old the oldest grains of powder in your container are, and if they start breaking down, the acid products they evolve will destroy the newer powder. This is why you see occasional recalls of powder that seem to be breaking down prematurely.

Norma guarantees powder you buy will last 10 years. Most will last much longer. If you are lucky and your powder lot is pure because the bulk lot it came from just happened to have the right burn rate without blending, then it can last many decades. Keeping powder in sealed containers in a freezer will also greatly extend its life.
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