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Old January 13, 2017, 03:22 PM   #51
maillemaker
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Seriously rodwhaincamo, breathing in lead fumes isn't exactly high on my priority list, much less spending my spare time recycling scrap lead.
TLJohnson: I think you are over-worried about the risks of casting bullets.

Casting for sure. Very little lead vapor is coming off of lead at casting temperatures. You should always cast in a well-ventilated area, but this is mostly so that the fumes from flux burning off are expelled. But it helps with any lead vapors also.

I've been casting for 7 years now and I get my lead levels checked at every annual physical. I have no issues.

Basically you have to ingest the lead to get lead poisoning. So don't drink or eat while or after handling lead.

Steve
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Old January 13, 2017, 04:29 PM   #52
Hawg
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[/QUOTE]It is not perfectly legal and if you ever have a mishap while you are making BP or storing it, you will be subject to civil and criminal liability. As a legal professional I cannot condone dangerous conditions or activities that places other people and their property at risk, just because you want to make black powder at home. [/QUOTE]

From page 64. https://www.atf.gov/explosives/docs/...54007/download Persons who manufacture explosives for their personal,
non-business use are not required to have a manufacturer’s
license.

This is all explosives not just bp. And as for lead it has to reach the boiling point for any toxic fumes to be released. Now go troll somewhere else.
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Old January 13, 2017, 05:15 PM   #53
Ricklin
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He is!

But MY neighbor is a redneck......not that there is anything wrong with that.

But yes, you are right makes no damn difference whether or not the neighbor is a redneck or a greenneck.
And what's to ensure that my redneck neighbor will limit his batches to 440 grams?
Just because an activity is legal does not mean it is safe. I really don't give a darn what he does to himself or his property.

I am having a little fun with this, but my point remains.
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Old January 13, 2017, 05:37 PM   #54
JACKlangrishe
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This is no way to make new friends..

I'd highly suggest doing a bit of reading before posting so aggressively on something you might not completely understand.

The rules are pretty clear on BP, and some of these guys have been casting lead and making powder since the civil war ended. If you're so worried, get your blood checked annually. It won't go from 0 to 100% overnight.
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Old January 13, 2017, 06:00 PM   #55
foolzrushn
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T.he L.awyer Johnson

Yes, black powder and many, many other things are dangerous. You are preaching to the choir. I'm sure there is a lot more black powder experience here on this forum than you have. You made your point, there is no need for you to repeatedly push your agenda.

You don't know where or under what situations people are making black power, yet you state that it is not legal. How do you know counselor? Is everyone guilty until proven innocent? They could be in non-residental or rural areas that allow it. Discussion of the subject is not the same as encouraging someone to make it. I have not made black powder but find the subject interesting.

No one needs to prove anything to you, with statistics or scientific data. If non-commercial black powder lifts the starshell high enough, or propels the ball fast enough...meets the requirements of the maker, then it's as good as commercial powder for that use.

Black powder pistols use a dangerous explosive for a propellant, you may breathe smoke and fumes of lead as you fire them, the very loud sound may damage your hearing, you may forget to wash your hands after handling the lead balls, the pistol may explode, you may shoot yourself....in short, I suspect that black powder weapons are too dangerous for you. I suggest you pursue something else.
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Old January 13, 2017, 06:07 PM   #56
Hawg
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I suspect that black powder weapons are too dangerous for you. I suggest you pursue something else.
Life is so dangerous there's no way you're getting out alive so my suggestion for TLJohnson is to get one and live it.
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Old January 13, 2017, 08:54 PM   #57
TLJohnson
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[Hawg]From page 64. https://www.atf.gov/explosives/docs/...54007/download Persons who manufacture explosives for their personal,
non-business use are not required to have a manufacturer’s license.
Your confusing making black powder, an explosive, for personal use and the liability laws that attach in connection with abnormal dangerous conditions or activities. They are not one and the same. By the same token, You can also own firearms that are regulated under law, but when you use them in a deadly encounter, you could be held liable from both a civil and criminal standpoint depending on the circumstances.

Similarly, if you make black powder and something goes wrong or the storage area goes up, you will be sued and likely charged with a crime. Your likelihood of prevailing in a strict liability civil lawsuit is slim, since there are very few major defenses that will get you off the hook. Other areas you might be subject to are public nuisance laws, when the condition or activities interfere
with the rights of others. Some states also provide for absolute nuisance on facts that would comprise strict liability for an abnormally dangerous condition or activity.

So, the bottom line, is if the person knows they are engaging in a non-normal or abnormal use of land that creates an increased danger to persons or property; accordingly, that person will be strictly liable for the harm caused by this use, as there is no need to prove negligence.

Lastly, the ATF disclaims that information they provide on their website is legal advice or binding in a court of law, so don't assume they are providing you with a carte blanche, because it is simply not so.
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Old January 13, 2017, 09:04 PM   #58
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I'm not likely to sue myself since I'm the only one that would be affected.
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Old January 13, 2017, 09:04 PM   #59
4V50 Gary
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Chill out everyone.

For anyone who wishes to discuss the legality and liability of rolling their own, there is another forum for that. This thread was about bullets for the 1858 and has strayed too far from the original topic.
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