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Old January 7, 2020, 10:41 AM   #1
Lavan
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What's the trend in COLLECTIBLE guns?

Retired coin/pawn guy here.

I still monitor the state of collectible coins and they have been trending downward for a few years.
Mainly due to generational non appreciation.
Guns SEEM to have weathered this trend a bit but lately I'm seeing more collectible guns than has been the case for a while.

Anyone keep up on collectible gun trends?

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Old January 7, 2020, 12:12 PM   #2
FrankenMauser
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The current younger generations don't care to waste time and space storing firearms that don't get used.
They'd rather have things that are affordable and usable (without consequences involving lost value).

The "Old Guard" are still swapping, trading, and going full tilt at auction, to complete their collections as their peers pass away and items come up for sale.
But, overall, in my opinion... We're nearing the end of wide spread, prolific gun collecting. As the boomers kick off and the market gets saturated (even flooded, by current standards), a lot of previously 'collectible' commercial firearms are going to be dropping in value.

Coins are a great comparison. Millenials ask the question: "What does it do?" What good is a coin in a plastic case? What good is an old revolver that sits in a box? What good does it do to have six hundred pounds of wheat pennies? How much fun can be had with a rare Winchester that does nothing but sit in a dark safe?

Mil-surps are a little different, though. There's been a resurgence in mil-surp collecting, with values still increasing. Notable modern films and shows about historic battles and wars certainly have some influence in the trend. But I think this also comes back to the "affordable and usable" concept. Mil-surps generally have wear and some evidence of abuse, with common but decent examples still being relatively affordable. As long as you don't Bubba, sporterize, or blow up the firearm, it retains its value while allowing you actually shoot and enjoy it.

To paraphrase an acquaintance's recent comments: "Why would I buy a two or three thousand dollar Python or Winchester that I can't touch, when I can get three or four, or six, really cool mil-surps THAT I CAN SHOOT?"


When I was younger, I collected PEZ dispensers.
I recently decided to dispose of them. There is, however, almost no market for them any more - not even the rare stuff. (Only the ultra-rare is worth selling.)
So, as I type this, I'm looking across the room at a box of targets for a future shooting trip. It is mostly full of PEZ dispensers...
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Last edited by FrankenMauser; January 7, 2020 at 12:18 PM.
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Old January 7, 2020, 01:37 PM   #3
Lavan
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A ...PEZ SHOOT!!!

Yowie! I'd be up for that. Might send a strange signal to range observers and invite "crazy gun nut" comments.
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Old January 7, 2020, 01:44 PM   #4
Sevens
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It seems like with toys or cars or guns or ______, the only somewhat predictable trend is that when the buying population reaches an age and income level where spending money on fun stuff becomes easier, most just want to chase down the things from their childhood or early adulthood that they fawned over and dreamt about but could never possibly afford back when it was new.

As for guns specifically, about the only other “sure bet” formula for a future valuable/collectible gun is one that was all of the following:

—high quality
—expensive when new
—made in short supply
—abrupt end that was not anticipated

If you have cash laying around, buy those if you want to take a guess what will be collectible later.
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Old January 7, 2020, 09:30 PM   #5
bn12gg
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In 20 years PEZ dispensers will be worth big dollsrs. FYI. Fwiw

.02. David.
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Old January 8, 2020, 08:33 AM   #6
USNRet93
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Quote:
Originally Posted by bn12gg View Post
In 20 years PEZ dispensers will be worth big dollsrs. FYI. Fwiw

.02. David.
HA, I thought that 40 years ago and my 8YO grand daughter just bought a new, StarWars, one..
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Old January 9, 2020, 12:01 PM   #7
Lavan
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I wouldn't be surprised to see a revival of PEZ.
That's ...IF.... the demographic of folks who remember the 50s have money to spend to relive their childhood.

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Old January 9, 2020, 12:06 PM   #8
Lavan
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And.... dumb or not...

I just got one of these.



HAD to! Have wanted for FIFTY years.
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Old January 10, 2020, 11:34 AM   #9
Skans
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Here's my list of "collectible guns", not in any particular order, which should increase over time:

1. registered machine guns
2. Borchardt C-93
3. High quality Lugers
4. High quality WWI era and pre-WWI 1911's
5. 1st Gen Glock
6. Open Bolt semi-autos;
7. Sphinx AT 2000
8. Bren Ten (10mm)
9. FN SCAR-17
10. Swiss manufactured SIG rifles
11. Anything engraved by a Fracassi
12. HK P7 type pistols
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Old January 11, 2020, 04:24 AM   #10
Targa
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If you look on Gunbroker, apparently the new Python is the trend for collectors now..
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Old January 30, 2020, 08:43 AM   #11
Skans
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Quote:
If you look on Gunbroker, apparently the new Python is the trend for collectors now..
Yes it is. I wonder if there is still any demand for older Pythons?
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Old January 31, 2020, 02:14 AM   #12
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Be sure to include any out of production gun featured in a popular movie.
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Old January 31, 2020, 01:27 PM   #13
T. O'Heir
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Lotta the current younger generations think anything that's older than themselves is collectable. A lot of the dealers on the assorted auction sites think anything they happen to have is collectable as well.
"...HK P7 type pistols...Bren Ten..." Nope. Mind you, people collect dinner plates, Coke bottles and empty cartridge boxes too.
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Old January 31, 2020, 02:33 PM   #14
Skans
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T. O'Heir, you don't think the P7's and Bren Ten's are collectible? Just Lugers and Colt Dragoons?
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Old February 12, 2020, 02:41 PM   #15
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I only discover trends in firearm collecting, after I've sold the guns at non-collector prices Things like the HK P7, early Bren Ten I purchased new during the short time they were in production, Pre War 98% National Match Colt, Swiss SIG P210s, early S&W Performance Center pistols, S&W 610 and 547 revolvers, etc, etc. This is why I don't give investment advice.............
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Old February 12, 2020, 06:29 PM   #16
2wheelwander
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Local guy has 1/3 of his garage floor covered and stacked with NIB baseball card sets maybe 4 feet tall. Ad said over 72k cards. Make offer, come and get them.

I sold my near NIB Colt HBAR for $800 when the tacticool thing started raging. Dents in my walls from my head over doing that.
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Old February 13, 2020, 11:10 AM   #17
mr bolo
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all your mass produced "polymer guns" will never have much resale value

a Glock collector is similar to a PEZ dispenser collector, not something made to be handed down to future generations, just something to use now.
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Old February 13, 2020, 01:19 PM   #18
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I believe that the 22 long rifle --- BSA Martini's have gone up in value. For the moment...I own three Martini 12/15's and a Mark II International --- All chambered in 22 long rifle.

Anybody else own a BSA Martini?
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Old February 15, 2020, 04:20 PM   #19
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S&W N-frames and K-frames.
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Old February 18, 2020, 10:22 AM   #20
Skans
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Quote:
a Glock collector is similar to a PEZ dispenser collector, not something made to be handed down to future generations, just something to use now
.

You might want to check out the action on early Glock17 Gen1's. They are definitely collectible. Whether people will still want them 100 years from now, no one knows. But, no one knows if people will still want 1st Gen Colt SAA's 100 years from now either. My bet is that, because there are more movies depicting glocks and Desert Eagles than there are old westerns showing off Colt SAA's, that shiny Deagles will be all the rage 100 years from now.
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Old February 21, 2020, 03:01 AM   #21
veprdude
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I would say any hammer fired, non-polymer pistol produced more than 15-20 years ago. An especially those that are currently in the $300 range. Think S&W 59 series, maybe Ruger P85/89, Beretta 92 (if they ever go out of production). Reason being is that almost anyone can get into a $300 pistol. The $2k+ required to enter the market for a Colt Python or Luger will limit those who can enter. That's why mil-surps are popular.

Hammer-fired pistols and A1/A2 clones are coming back.
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Old February 22, 2020, 05:54 PM   #22
KEYBEAR
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A lot o my firearms were bought years ago NEW now I found out I have COLLECTIBLE,s
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Old February 24, 2020, 05:23 PM   #23
Skans
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Guns that I thought would be collectible by now.....but aren't:

Colt SP1 Carbine
S&W 659
Desert Eagle 44 magnum
Carbon 15 Type 97

What I didn't think would be collectible but is:
Chinese Polytech AK's
Ruger AC556
Braverman Pen Guns
1st Gen Glocks

Then there are guns that still baffle me:
Israeli FAL made by SBL - Armscorp import
Holloway Arms HAC-7
USAS-12
FN FNC
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Old February 25, 2020, 09:38 AM   #24
buck460XVR
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Collectables are a fickle trend and hard to forecast. Kinda what makes things collectable. Used to be things that were common and used a lot in everyday life, that made it 40-50 years in mint condition were collectable. Nostalgia has been a big influence for us Baby-Boomers. One only has to look back on Baseball cards, Beanie Babies and Antiques to see what is hot today, might be hard to even give away a tad more down the road of time.

All and all, guns, for the most part are a poor investment. While many appreciate after being bought, most never keep up with inflation or the cost of living. Collecting to satisfy one's personal taste or interest is a whole other thing. As for guns, anything collectable today is already old and you'll probably pay too much for it to appreciate much more within your lifetime. New guns, may be an investment for your future grandchildren.
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Old February 25, 2020, 09:47 AM   #25
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IF if was going to invest in firearms as a collector, I would only look at those that have a proven track record of increasing in value beating the DOW. Guaranteed that is less than 1%. Those firearms that have a history with a paper trail and appurtenances seem to do the best. But in most cases, firearms are worse "investments" than coins or stamps or antique toys.

I was fortunate enough to see a few rare collections, a local man had an impressive collection of Weatherby's, all gens from the actions Roy bought, to commissioned up through the ones Weatherby manufactured. Commissioned scopes and some rare calibers. Only a few of the collection really had any large value.

I build some one off AR15s that get sold at a benefit auction. First one went for $4K and the one last month went for $10K. They are unique and there won't ever be another like them, but I do not think they are a good investment.
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