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Old February 18, 2012, 12:17 AM   #1
mklaerner
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Remington Rand M1911A1

I hope to get some information about a Remington Rand M1911A1. My parents acquired this pistol at a small shop in Marble Falls, Texas during the late 1960's. I always loved this gun so when my dad offered it to me I jumped at the opportunity.
After performing some research online it appears that all the markings are in order. The S/N stamp reads - NO. 197**** which indicates its production date to be in 1944 with United States Property stamped just over it. M1911A1 U.S. ARMY is stamped in alignment with UNITED STATES PROPERTY. "C" is stamped on the trigger guard on the right and a "3" is stamped on the left side of the gun trigger guard. Also found a "P" under the magazine release as well as on the top of the slide near the rear sight. "FJA" (Frank J. Atwood) is stamped on the body of the gun.
Although I do not know what material was used to manufacture this weapon, it is very shiny! The only known non original issue items are the grips, which are Sterling Silver and were produced in Mexico. How can I get a market value for this weapon? Any help would be most appreciated!
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Old February 18, 2012, 12:45 AM   #2
dsk
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The markings all sound correct, but unfortunately it's not supposed to be shiny. These pistols were made first with a sandblasted matte Du-Lite blue, then later an equally dull Parkerized grey finish. Original grips were checkered brown plastic. Since it has been polished and refinished I'd etimate its value at between $600-$800.
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Old February 18, 2012, 09:51 AM   #3
mklaerner
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Thanks

I had hoped for better, but I never thought that it had been refinished. Thanks so much for the information.
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Old February 18, 2012, 01:55 PM   #4
laytonj1
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Mine was made in 1945 and has the parkerized finish.
While I don't know what a refinished one would go for, a completely original one like this can run close to $1.5K.

Jim

Last edited by laytonj1; February 18, 2012 at 02:01 PM.
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Old February 18, 2012, 01:59 PM   #5
Chris_B
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dsk is right on the money. 'Shiny' finish...could we see a photograph, please? As far as the material used...it's steel

Sounds like a nice family heirloom to me. Having a refinish would never hurt its intrinsic value to you and your family. I'd like to see it
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Old February 18, 2012, 08:46 PM   #6
StrangeBird1911
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Saw a Remington Rand 1911 at gun show this weekend, asking $1200. Looked fully original, but seller said the guts were mis-matched. During the war, armorers would get guns working by grabbing parts from other guns, so you could have a gun with Remington frame, Colt barrel, etc.
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Old February 18, 2012, 09:06 PM   #7
AKsRul.e
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HOW SHINY ?

If it was nickel or chrome plated after the war it's only value is as a used shooter.
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Old February 18, 2012, 10:08 PM   #8
dsk
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Quote:
Saw a Remington Rand 1911 at gun show this weekend, asking $1200. Looked fully original, but seller said the guts were mis-matched. During the war, armorers would get guns working by grabbing parts from other guns, so you could have a gun with Remington frame, Colt barrel, etc.
Mixing up parts was commonplace in the military regardless of the time period. Arsenals and repair depots knew that all the parts were supposed to be interchangeable, and they honestly couldn't care less about keeping parts matched for the future benefit of gun collectors.
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Old February 19, 2012, 12:35 PM   #9
Scharfschuetzer
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The US military never serial numbered anything other than the frame or receiver their weapons. In Europe, it was common practice to at least use the last two numbers of the serial number on all sub components of the weapon and thus it is easy to see non-original parts.

That said, on the 45 autos, the slide carried the manufacturers name, the frame the serial number. It is common to see arsenal rebuilt pistols with Remington Rand slides and Colt frames or vice a versa or any other combination possible given all the subcontracting of the 1911A1.

While it is easy to see the manufacturer's name on the slide, finding out who made the frame is often a challenge, but as manufacturers were given serial number blocks to work within, that can be a clue. Manufactureres often used a different "font" for their serial number too and that can also be used as a clue as to who made the frame.

Here is a link to a site that will help you ID who made your 1911's frame and also when it was made:

http://coolgunsite.com/pistols/colt%...1%20Production

For years I though that I had a Colt 1911A1, but now I know that it is a Colt slide and a Remington Rand frame. Still shoots just as well, but it would have been nice if it had been all original. By the way, it came through the DCM (predecessor to the CMP) so it is a "real" or "genuine" US Military firearm, but a perfect example of the arsenal mix and match rebuild process.
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Last edited by Scharfschuetzer; February 19, 2012 at 12:50 PM.
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Old February 19, 2012, 12:42 PM   #10
dsk
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Colt serial numbered the slides as well from #710,001 until right around the #1,140,000 range. However that was Colt carrying over a habit from their commercial production, and not a military requirement. The numbers on those can be found hidden behind the firing pin stop plate.
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