The Firing Line Forums

Go Back   The Firing Line Forums > Hogan's Alley > Handguns: The Semi-automatic Forum

Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread
Old June 9, 2019, 07:24 PM   #1
sarge912
Member
 
Join Date: May 18, 2019
Location: Beautiful Parma Ohio
Posts: 52
Series 70 (1973) Satin Combat Commander.


Many years ago, early in my career, I carried a Satin Nickel Colt Combat Commander. It was pretty beat when I got it but it shot straight and true. Then the department banned any and all automatics for carry off-duty/backup.
I ended up trading if for a Model 60 S&W but always wished that I had kept it.

I came across this one in near perfect condition.
I already have an ATI Clone in blue, which is a wonderful shooter, but still does not hold the same level of nostalgia as the original Colt.

I hope to test them both against each other in the very new future but for now I am just glad that I was able to find it.


Last edited by sarge912; June 11, 2019 at 01:59 PM.
sarge912 is offline  
Old June 9, 2019, 08:30 PM   #2
tipoc
Senior Member
 
Join Date: December 11, 2004
Location: Redwood City, Ca.
Posts: 3,817
Great find!

tipoc
__________________
1. All guns are always loaded.
2. Never let the muzzle cover anything you are not willing to destroy.
3. Keep your finger off the trigger till you are ready to shoot.
4. Identify your target and know what is beyond it.
tipoc is offline  
Old June 10, 2019, 09:16 AM   #3
sarge912
Member
 
Join Date: May 18, 2019
Location: Beautiful Parma Ohio
Posts: 52
Just back from the range. As I expected, it shot great, ate anything that I gave it including aluminum and reloads. I suspect I will get a tighter group when I add the Pierce finger grips.

Having said that, I find that I shoot my ATI a lot better. It has superior grips and better sights out of the box. The Colt has all Wilson Combat springs and it is very tight. The ATI is broken in and the action is like butter.

I would not hesitate to use either one.

I dropped the Colt off at a friend of mine's for a little polish work on the feed ramp. (He did wonders for my Thompson 1927 A1) Next trip out if will be all tuned up with better grips. Not much I want to do about the sights. They work and I don't really want to change them.
sarge912 is offline  
Old June 10, 2019, 11:23 AM   #4
44 AMP
Staff
 
Join Date: March 11, 2006
Location: Upper US
Posts: 19,828
Quote:
I dropped the Colt off at a friend of mine's for a little polish work on the feed ramp.
Ok, there is always "because I want to", but, if...

Quote:
it shot great, ate anything that I gave it including aluminum and reloads.
Then WHY have it worked on??
__________________
All else being equal (and it almost never is) bigger bullets tend to work better.
44 AMP is online now  
Old June 10, 2019, 11:57 AM   #5
tipoc
Senior Member
 
Join Date: December 11, 2004
Location: Redwood City, Ca.
Posts: 3,817
I was gonna ask the same thing, about the ramp, but I let it go.

One small point Colt listed there as "Satin Nickel Finishes" rather than chrome. Colt made blued and satin nickel versions of this steel framed gun.

tipoc
__________________
1. All guns are always loaded.
2. Never let the muzzle cover anything you are not willing to destroy.
3. Keep your finger off the trigger till you are ready to shoot.
4. Identify your target and know what is beyond it.
tipoc is offline  
Old June 10, 2019, 01:39 PM   #6
Aguila Blanca
Staff
 
Join Date: September 25, 2008
Location: CONUS
Posts: 12,255
I agree, not satin chrome. I think it's electroless nickel. Nice pistola. Me like.
Aguila Blanca is offline  
Old June 10, 2019, 03:23 PM   #7
sarge912
Member
 
Join Date: May 18, 2019
Location: Beautiful Parma Ohio
Posts: 52
there were a few 'dig' marks in the feed ramp, even though it was feeding okay. He will smooth them out.

I have read that the SC in the serial number originally was described by Colt as Satin Chrome.
sarge912 is offline  
Old June 10, 2019, 07:11 PM   #8
cw308
Senior Member
 
Join Date: September 2, 2010
Location: Plainview , Long Island NY
Posts: 3,416
I also in the 70's bought a blued Combat Commander , I sold it to a friend for what I paid for it 134.00 brand new . I kick myself to this day for selling it . I think they made a Stainless Steel also at that time . They are a sweet and perfectly balanced pistol . If I happen to see one of those in a gun shop it would be hard not to bring it home .
cw308 is offline  
Old June 10, 2019, 07:53 PM   #9
Dufus
Senior Member
 
Join Date: December 10, 2014
Location: Texas
Posts: 1,748
I still have mine that I bought in the mid 70s. I have the blued version that I bought first. They are both still original and both function and shoot great.

If memory serves me, I paid about $345 for the blued one and maybe $75 more for the satin nickle model. Not much nowadays, but that was a lot back then.
Dufus is offline  
Old June 10, 2019, 08:02 PM   #10
laytonj1
Senior Member
 
Join Date: June 1, 2005
Location: Alabama
Posts: 4,236
That is definitely satin nickel. Electroless nickel looks more like stainless steel.
Colt did not offer chrome finishes back then.

Jim
laytonj1 is offline  
Old June 10, 2019, 09:12 PM   #11
K_Mac
Senior Member
 
Join Date: September 15, 2010
Posts: 1,849
Beautiful handgun. Congratulations. I suspect the satisfaction of having a piece of your past in hand is worth what you paid. Enjoy!
__________________
"Any fool can criticize, condemn and complain and most fools do." Benjamin Franklin
K_Mac is offline  
Old June 11, 2019, 07:29 AM   #12
rodfac
Senior Member
 
Join Date: January 22, 2005
Location: Kentucky
Posts: 2,956
Great find...and, short of SS, about as indestructible a 1911 as you'll find. I had one in .45 ACP for 15 yrs or so, put 5000+ rounds of non-shooting-game practice through it, then gave it to #2 son who really wanted it for carry. Along the way I found a Series 70 pair of slides and barrels in 9mm and .38 Super that fit it well; and aside from changing out the ejector, required no other changes to function at near 100%. I also bought the Ciener .22 LR conversion upper for it, making it a 4-caliber Commander...a very versatile gun indeed.

Hope you have as much fun with yours as I did with mine over the years.

Best Regards, Rod
__________________
Cherish our flag, honor it, defend what it stands for in word and deed, or get the hell out. Our Freedoms are not free, they've been paid for many times over by heros in uniform. We owe them and our children, the best that we can do.

USAF FAC, 5th Spl Forces, An Loc, lll Corps, RVN, 69-70, Vietnam Vet '69-'73
rodfac is offline  
Old June 11, 2019, 07:36 AM   #13
sarge912
Member
 
Join Date: May 18, 2019
Location: Beautiful Parma Ohio
Posts: 52
New grip extension came from Amazon. Hopefully have it up and running in a day or two. Need to get down in the shop and start loading up a bunch of ammo.
sarge912 is offline  
Old June 11, 2019, 07:58 AM   #14
Jim Watson
Senior Member
 
Join Date: October 25, 2001
Location: Alabama
Posts: 15,623
Looks like you got a nice one.
That finish shows dirt and wear worse than any I know of, so keep your GI toothbrush handy.
Jim Watson is offline  
Old June 11, 2019, 11:17 AM   #15
Aguila Blanca
Staff
 
Join Date: September 25, 2008
Location: CONUS
Posts: 12,255
Just be sure to keep Hoppe's #9 far away from it.
Aguila Blanca is offline  
Old June 11, 2019, 12:01 PM   #16
sarge912
Member
 
Join Date: May 18, 2019
Location: Beautiful Parma Ohio
Posts: 52
The barrel appears to be stainless or at least no plating, but I hear what you are saying. Nothing that reacts with nickle. (This is my second one.)
sarge912 is offline  
Old June 11, 2019, 12:48 PM   #17
SIGSHR
Senior Member
 
Join Date: September 13, 2005
Posts: 4,259
I treasure mine. I had a gunsmith install MMC fixed sights, shoots a lot better since, those satin nickel sights were too hard to see. Naturally I've been looking for another factory slide...
SIGSHR is offline  
Old June 11, 2019, 01:11 PM   #18
tipoc
Senior Member
 
Join Date: December 11, 2004
Location: Redwood City, Ca.
Posts: 3,817
Quote:
I have read that the SC in the serial number originally was described by Colt as Satin Chrome.
I checked back with R.L. Wilson's book "Colt an American legend" on the serial number.

The Commander model gun was introduced in 1949 with an aluminum alloy frame. In 1950 Colt began the serial suffix LW to indicate Light Weight. In 1969 that LW became a prefix of CLW for Commander Light Weight.

In 1970 Colt introduced the steel framed Combat Commander with blued and nickel finishes. For blued guns the prefix was 70BSxxxx for Blued Steel and the SC for nickel. No one mentions it being for "chrome". It also obviously isn't chrome. They also produced two nickel versions the satin nickel and the standard shiny nickel.

Quote:
The barrel appears to be stainless or at least no plating, but I hear what you are saying. Nothing that reacts with nickle. (This is my second one.)
The barrel is carbon steel with a polished hood it's simply not blued. Colt was not making stainless steel barrels for a few more years as I understand it.

Your gun is an early one has only 3 numbers after the 70SC. Maybe 1970.

tipoc
__________________
1. All guns are always loaded.
2. Never let the muzzle cover anything you are not willing to destroy.
3. Keep your finger off the trigger till you are ready to shoot.
4. Identify your target and know what is beyond it.
tipoc is offline  
Old June 11, 2019, 01:58 PM   #19
sarge912
Member
 
Join Date: May 18, 2019
Location: Beautiful Parma Ohio
Posts: 52
The Colt sight said mine was shipped in 1973 but does not say exactly when it was made.
sarge912 is offline  
Old June 12, 2019, 10:59 AM   #20
vba
Senior Member
 
Join Date: October 26, 2008
Posts: 355
Beautiful, I've got the same gun but in full size. Very nice!
vba is offline  
Old June 13, 2019, 08:40 PM   #21
dgludwig
Senior Member
 
Join Date: February 12, 2005
Location: North central Ohio
Posts: 7,035
I'm curious whether the Series 70 "Commander" and its Colt ilk pistol has the same collet-style bushing the Gold Cup variants came with in that era.
__________________
ONLY AN ARMED PEOPLE CAN BE TRULY FREE ; ONLY AN UNARMED PEOPLE CAN EVER BE ENSLAVED
...Aristotle
NRA Benefactor Life Member
dgludwig is offline  
Old June 13, 2019, 09:02 PM   #22
sarge912
Member
 
Join Date: May 18, 2019
Location: Beautiful Parma Ohio
Posts: 52
my original one had the three finger collet and it was super tight, requiring a special tool to remove it. This looks pretty much like my other 1911's. solid collet.
sarge912 is offline  
Old June 13, 2019, 09:34 PM   #23
dahermit
Senior Member
 
Join Date: October 28, 2006
Location: South Central Michigan...near
Posts: 5,562
Quote:
Originally Posted by sarge912 View Post
my original one had the three finger collet and it was super tight, requiring a special tool to remove it. This looks pretty much like my other 1911's. solid collet.
The Series 70's did not require a "special tool" to remove the collet bushing. A standard bushing tool or even the rounded fore-part of a standard G.I. magazine floor plate would turn it to the unlocked position provided one follow the correct procedure of pushing the slide reward until the collet was clear of the enlarged portion of the barrel.

I found that my Series 70 Mark IV Government Model with its collet bushing was less difficult to remove if the slide was pushed back as posted above than is a tightly fitted solid target bushing is in one of my other 1911's.
__________________
When you seek advice it is spelled with a "c". In case anyone really wanted to know, and even if you didn't.
Lookup "run" in the dictionary...you will find that it is not a synonym for "function", "shoot", or "use". If you live in the U.S.A, learn to speak English.
dahermit is offline  
Old June 13, 2019, 09:36 PM   #24
dahermit
Senior Member
 
Join Date: October 28, 2006
Location: South Central Michigan...near
Posts: 5,562
Quote:
Originally Posted by dgludwig View Post
I'm curious whether the Series 70 "Commander" and its Colt ilk pistol has the same collet-style bushing the Gold Cup variants came with in that era.
No, only the full-length Series 70 models had the collet bushing...the Commanders had solid bushings.
__________________
When you seek advice it is spelled with a "c". In case anyone really wanted to know, and even if you didn't.
Lookup "run" in the dictionary...you will find that it is not a synonym for "function", "shoot", or "use". If you live in the U.S.A, learn to speak English.
dahermit is offline  
Old June 13, 2019, 09:44 PM   #25
sarge912
Member
 
Join Date: May 18, 2019
Location: Beautiful Parma Ohio
Posts: 52
Quote:
Originally Posted by dahermit View Post
The Series 70's did not require a "special tool" to remove the collet bushing. A standard bushing tool or even the rounded fore-part of a standard G.I. magazine floor plate would turn it to the unlocked position provided one follow the correct procedure of pushing the slide reward until the collet was clear of the enlarged portion of the barrel.

I found that my Series 70 Mark IV Government Model with its collet bushing was less difficult to remove if the slide was pushed back as posted above than is a tightly fitted solid target bushing is in one of my other 1911's.
by 'special tool' I was referring to the bushing tool. I was not the original owner so I don't know if the colllet was from the factory.
sarge912 is offline  
Reply

Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off

Forum Jump


All times are GMT -5. The time now is 11:03 AM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.7
Copyright ©2000 - 2019, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.
This site and contents, including all posts, Copyright © 1998-2018 S.W.A.T. Magazine
Copyright Complaints: Please direct DMCA Takedown Notices to the registered agent: thefiringline.com
Contact Us
Page generated in 0.08966 seconds with 8 queries