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Old February 4, 2011, 06:31 PM   #1
sbrville
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Dent in Shoulder

Hey, i had a box of old 243 casings given to me to reload. Writing on the box looked like they had been reloaded before so i thought it would be a good batch to practice annealing on. I did a light, short anneal on them and thought it went perfect, but when i resized them, 4 got a dent in the shoulder. Are these junk or will they be safe and fire form? i am guessing i got them to soft but i never had them glowing when i heated them. thanks sb

Last edited by sbrville; February 4, 2011 at 06:32 PM. Reason: sp
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Old February 4, 2011, 06:38 PM   #2
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Pictures would be helpful. Are you sure you didn't just use too much lubricant? That can cause dents sometimes.
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Old February 4, 2011, 08:21 PM   #3
sbrville
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this is my second batch of rifle reloads ever so may very well have been to much lube. they seemed tighter in the die.dent1.jpg

dent2.jpg

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Old February 4, 2011, 08:28 PM   #4
Brian Pfleuger
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That looks like a dent from excess lube.


The problem with annealing is that there's no such thing as "light and short".

Brass is either not annealed, safely annealed or annealed to the point of being dangerous.

The problem is, the average reloader has no reliable way to now which is which unless you have some specialized equipment. You may have done NOTHING to those cases or they may now be dangerous.

At the very least, you want to have some temperature indicating compound on the neck and preferably the head of the case in a "heatsink", Hornady sells one such system.
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Old February 5, 2011, 07:42 AM   #5
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Too much lube on the shoulder

can cause the dents. Annealed brass has soft shoulders, so will dent more easily. Firing the dented brass is usually not a problem, they will fireform very well. As to annealing: I use a 650 degree temp stick purchased at a welding supply store. Apply the crayon just below the shoulder, spin the case over heat, concentrated on the neck, and as soon as the crayon melts, or turns color, it good to go. The crayon sorta stains the brass, but it's Ok.
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Old February 5, 2011, 08:10 AM   #6
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To much case lube generally give you that,also there should be a small air bleed hole on the side of your resizing die between the threads make sure it open.

The cases will be fine after you shoot them and those dents will be gone. It's possible to over anneal the brass and make it to soft and crush the whole shoulder during resizing.
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Old February 5, 2011, 08:35 AM   #7
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Getting the lube layer right is a learned process but the dents are harmless.

Annealing is easy but it's even easier to do it improperly. Under done means you just got it hot but didn't change anything. Over heating the brass, any visible red glow, just burns the zinc and leaves dead soft copper but it's not unsafe, the body of the case is what does the chamber sealing.
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Old February 5, 2011, 08:50 AM   #8
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That looks like a lube dent. I have dies with the air hole on the side, but when I get carried away with the lube, I still get the dents.

They're harmless. Just back off on the lube and don't worry about it. The next time you fire it, the pressure inside the case will take care of the dent.
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Old February 5, 2011, 09:03 AM   #9
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Next time you resize try wiping the neck and shoulders with you fingers to remove the lube.
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Old February 5, 2011, 09:09 AM   #10
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Confirm, lube dents. They are safe to fire, if your loads are otherwise safe.
Suggestion: If your gun is a bolt action, get a Lee Collet Neck Size die, which requires no lube. In most instances, neck sizing is preferable to full length sizing and using the Lee die, troublesome lubing is no longer involved.
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Old February 5, 2011, 01:05 PM   #11
sbrville
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Thanks for all the info. Ill remember for next time. I have a collet neck die but these were fired from another rifle than mine. I will also have to look into a temp stick before i anneal again. thanks again
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Old February 5, 2011, 02:02 PM   #12
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My vote is for "lube dent". On that note, I recently bought a LEE Rifle die kit in .308. The sizing die has a hole drilled in it that relieves the hydraulic pressure caused by too much lube in the shoulder area. None of my .308 cases now get these dents, no matter how careless I am with applying lube.
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Old February 5, 2011, 03:35 PM   #13
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If you want to anneal reliably get some TempIlSticks.

A mark on the brass just below the shoulder will change when you hit the sticks temperature.
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Old February 5, 2011, 04:36 PM   #14
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That dented shoulder is the result of case lube getting on the shoulder or over lubing the case. If the shoulder has lube on it, or if the neck has too much it will push the lube down to the shoulder where it gets trapped during your resize.
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