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Old May 9, 2019, 04:12 PM   #1
kjsound
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Mauser 93 Bolt Disassembly Problem

Hello,

I am new to the group and hoping to get some info on a newly acquired Mauser 93....or so I think it is. I have seen numerous videos on how to disassemble the bolt for cleaning on the 93 mauser, however this bolt does not want to obey the "rules"....

The bolt appears to have an aftermarket safety on it that does not have a straight up position. When I cock the bolt and then try to remove the bolt with the safety on, it simply decocks before opening. I can put the safety in an upright position by pulling the striker back farther and moving it into the straight up position, but then the bolt will not open.

I have read many stories about NOT taking the bolt apart if it is not cocked. I do know the back of the bolt does look like it will unscrew with it uncocked. I just did not try to completely remove it for fear of screwing something up.

So, what is the trick to getting the bolt apart for cleaning with an aftermarket safety. Here are some picts....
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Old May 9, 2019, 04:38 PM   #2
Scorch
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1- Push the cocking piece as far to the rear as you can by using the sear surface on the edge of a bench/table and pushing down, slip a penny in between the cocking piece and the bolt shroud. Unscrew the bolt shroud by turning the bolt shroud counterclockwise.

2- Push the firing pin in as far as it will go and remove the cocking piece by turning 90 degrees and slipping it off. You can now remove the safety for clean and lube as well.

3- Put the extractor claw to the bottom of the bolt (no retaining groove on the bottom) and push the claw forward to remove it.

4- Clean the parts, reinstall in reverse order.

Remember to capture the firing pin with the penny when screwing the bolt shroud into the bolt body.
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Old May 9, 2019, 06:54 PM   #3
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Your bolt has been fitted with a "scope safety", and yes it changes the usual disassembly process. Do what Scorch said, it will work.
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Old May 10, 2019, 12:35 PM   #4
kjsound
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The penny idea worked perfectly....thanks. I tried it this morning and the bolt came apart just fine, although in need of a lot of cleaning. Will spend some time cleaning it up and then it should be in good shape again.

As a side note, I do not know the history of this rifle. It appears to be in very good shape other than a couple light areas of pitting on the outside of the barrel and receiver. Should there be any reservations to shooting the rifle??....the bolt seems to be lock in tight when closed. The bore appears in really good shape with no visible blemishes.

Am also trying to get an idea what kind of Mauser this thing is as the markings are very sparse and it has been sporterised by someone in the past, although would it be better to open a new thread for identifying the gun?? I have a few pictures I can share...
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Old May 10, 2019, 01:27 PM   #5
F. Guffey
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Quote:
Am also trying to get an idea what kind of Mauser this thing is as the markings are very sparse and it has been sporterised by someone in the past, although would it be better to open a new thread for identifying the gun?? I have a few pictures I can share...
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Better to open a new thread
I do not know about that. The bolt handle knob looks like the bolt handle knob on a couple of my 33 Turks that once upon a time called Spanish Mausers, it could be a coincidence.

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Old May 10, 2019, 03:00 PM   #6
Jim Watson
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The squared off bolt face shows it is indeed an 1893.

If in good condition, it is fine to shoot in its original 7mm.
Some other calibers that it could have been rebarrelled to are OK, some not unless loaded down.
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Old May 10, 2019, 03:57 PM   #7
kjsound
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Here are a few more pictures of the rifle....the only markings visible are on the left side of the receiver pictured. I have measured the muzzle with a caliper and it does measure .284 inches....so it most definitely seems to be 7mm.

The pitting on the side of the chamber in one of the photos is pretty much all that is on the rifle and seems to be mostly surface....
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Old May 10, 2019, 04:38 PM   #8
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The barrel is stepped, as the original military barrels were, so its probably original. The stock looks to be the military stock, cut down, with an added pad.

Take off the front scope base and see if there are markings on the receiver ring. That's the usual place for markings indicating which nation DWM made the rifle for.

Its 7mm, so my guess would be Spain. HOWEVER, get a chamber cast done, its unlikely its anything other than the standard 7x57, but its not impossible, best to know for sure.
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Old May 10, 2019, 10:53 PM   #9
Jim Watson
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These were common and cheap before GCA1968.
It will shoot but it's not worth sinking a lot of money into.
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Old May 11, 2019, 02:54 AM   #10
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As far as 1893 Mausers go, you got one of the best, a DWM 1893 rifle (not a Spanish Oviedo Mauser). Still, same rules apply: clean it, find out what it is chambered for, maybe shoot it a bit. Ammo for 7X57 is not cheap or common, but it is relatively easy to find. I would expect the bore is pretty much gone, I could be wrong, so it may not shoot all that well anyway.
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Old May 11, 2019, 01:34 PM   #11
kjsound
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Took the front scope mount off this morning and found nothing, zilch, nada. Doesn't even look like something has been sanded off. So, unless there is something under the stock, which I was going to remove for a thorough cleaning......the only markings are what was shown in the photos.
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Old May 15, 2019, 01:09 AM   #12
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Had time tonight to remove the stock from the rifle and clean everything up. The first concern was the pitting found under the stock....especially around the chamber area. There are a couple spot that appear to be almost 1/8" deep on the front edge of the chamber.

That begs the question....how much pitting before the rifle is really unsafe? Is it worth the risk???
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Old May 15, 2019, 11:18 AM   #13
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Quote:
Originally Posted by kjsound View Post
Had time tonight to remove the stock from the rifle and clean everything up. The first concern was the pitting found under the stock....especially around the chamber area. There are a couple spot that appear to be almost 1/8" deep on the front edge of the chamber.

That begs the question....how much pitting before the rifle is really unsafe? Is it worth the risk???
An 1/8" is quite a bit. I'm thinking your a bit uneasy about it. I won't encourage you to throw caution to the wind, you paid so little for the rifle it's probably best to follow your gut feelings.
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Old May 17, 2019, 06:22 PM   #14
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Edited my own post...

Looks like an Chilean export (1893 predecessor to the 1895), DWM made quite a number of them chambered in the 7mm. Spanish mausers were from Lowe Berlin. Most of them were imported prior to import stamping. Squared bolt face. Small ring receiver with shield, letter and number stamped on the port side.

Eastern euro mfg 7 mm still easy to come by and cheap online. Often times it is loaded on the softer side for use in older weapons. They ALL shoot high and right off the irons, obviously dialed in on ammo from a different era.

https://www.midwayusa.com/product/27...oint-box-of-20

If the bolt locks and holds tight, I wouldn't mess with it.

Not sure about the pitting, but you might wear eye protection.
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Old May 18, 2019, 04:55 PM   #15
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Spanish mausers were from Lowe Berlin
Not to be a nitpicker here, but most Spanish model 1893 Mausers were made under license in Spain at the Oviedo arsenal, and are so marked. There are numerous documented issues with Spanish Mausers, mostly in the hardening of the receivers. Many 1893 Mauser rifles made by Loewe were sold around the world, notably in South America (these are NOT Spanish Mausers). Any Loewe marked Mauser is a real Mauser (Waffenfabrik Mauser was bought by Ludwig Loewe, later became Deutsche Waffen und Munitionfabriken (DWM) in 1897). Are they better than Oviedo Spanish Mausers? I like to think so, but I could be wrong. Calling a DWM or Loewe Mauser a Spanish Mauser is inaccurate.
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Old May 18, 2019, 08:44 PM   #16
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Originally Posted by Scorch View Post
Not to be a nitpicker here, but most Spanish model 1893 Mausers were made under license in Spain at the Oviedo arsenal, and are so marked. There are numerous documented issues with Spanish Mausers, mostly in the hardening of the receivers. Many 1893 Mauser rifles made by Loewe were sold around the world, notably in South America (these are NOT Spanish Mausers). Any Loewe marked Mauser is a real Mauser (Waffenfabrik Mauser was bought by Ludwig Loewe, later became Deutsche Waffen und Munitionfabriken (DWM) in 1897). Are they better than Oviedo Spanish Mausers? I like to think so, but I could be wrong. Calling a DWM or Loewe Mauser a Spanish Mauser is inaccurate.
My 1893 has it's writing in Osmanlica. The receiver has writing on the side but I have not been able to translate it. I read somewhere that the German manufacturers did that for the Turks but have not been able to find that article again. They are the same design as the Spanish version but I don't think they were made in Spain. Around 1933 they were all converted to 8mm either by a re-bore or barrel replacement. The rifling on mine is perfect and the reamer marks are still present in the chamber so mine probably went straight to storage after conversion. It has been fired but it was likely after it was imported.

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Old May 20, 2019, 08:43 AM   #17
kjsound
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Thanks for all the input fellas. Do to the severe pitting, I ended up returning the Mauser back to the gun shop as I actually received it on trade for some work I did for them. I was a little bummed as I was exciting to mess around with a 7X57. Oh well, maybe something in better shape will come along. Thanks again for the help.
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Old May 22, 2019, 07:19 AM   #18
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It would be VERY understanding of a gun shop to "take back" a used rifle that's been disassembled and fiddled with(taking the bolt apart and such).
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