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Old January 14, 2015, 06:08 PM   #1
TheeAntic
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The "right" way to deal with cross eye dominance?

I suffer from cross eye dominance, I am right handed yet my left eye is dominant.

Years ago in boot camp I was told to suck it up and shoot the right way. Right handed with my right eye. I'm tired of having my left eye closed on long guns and although it has never really bothered me with handguns plenty of people have good reasons for me to kick the bad habits.

So that being said, what is the right way to do things in my case?

Long guns need to be shot left handed right? Does that mean I need to acquire left handed models of my firearms?

Should handguns be shot left handed as well? Carried on my left side? I have been shooting right handed with my head turned but apparently that's not the best option.

What are your thoughts? What is the "right" way to deal with this.
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Old January 14, 2015, 06:41 PM   #2
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Im in same boat, right handed, left eyed.

Shooting most right handed long arms lefty is no big deal. If you can do it comfortably, do it. Your long range accuracy will be better.
The only way to shoot two eyes open for you will be as a lefty with a rifle.

The isosceles (or modified isosceles) stance for pistol work will work well for you. Your right hand remains dominant but you can use your left eye or both eyes open. Avoid the weaver stance.
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Old January 14, 2015, 07:09 PM   #3
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I'm right handed, but due to a nerve problem in the right side of my face, I shoot handguns right handed with my left eye with no problems. I shoot rifles left handed. I've mostly had right handed rifles. The next bolt gun I get will be a lefty.
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Old January 14, 2015, 07:28 PM   #4
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Not necessarily........when was the last time you had your vision tested.

I am right eye dominant but I have learned to shoot with both hands and both eyes open. It just takes practice like anything else.
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Old January 14, 2015, 08:39 PM   #5
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I'm tight-handed/left dominant.

I shoot right-handed rifles w/ the right eye.
I shoot right-handed pistols w/ the left eye.

'Don't even think about it, ...never have.
Still don't.
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Old January 14, 2015, 08:50 PM   #6
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Vt.birdhunter
The only way to shoot two eyes open for you will be as a lefty with a rifle.
This is what I thought, thank you.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Vt.birdhunter
The isosceles (or modified isosceles) stance for pistol work will work well for you. Your right hand remains dominant but you can use your left eye or both eyes open. Avoid the weaver stance.
Today 06:08 PM
This is what I have been doing, isosceles while turning my head in order to use my left eye. Supposedly its not ideal for repeatability, field of vision and SHTF type scenarios.
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Old January 14, 2015, 09:17 PM   #7
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^^^ Yes. I am right handed and left eye dominant as was my father. About sixty years ago my father figured I had the same problem he had and suggested the solution that worked for him - shooting long guns left handed. It didn't take long for my accuracy to dramatically improve and I've never regretted shooting long guns left handed. Of course I remain right handed and have been bow hunting with left hand bows for years. It is even more important with the small string peep sight that is very close to my left eye at full draw. My guess is that it would have been extremely difficult to shoot a compound bow with a small string peep sight right handed with my dominant left eye "trying to control" my vision.

edit: typo
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Old January 14, 2015, 09:22 PM   #8
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Left handed, right eyed.
I learned to be ambi- on pistols, but rifles / shotgun are usually right, as you only have to have a hot shell pop you in the eye once, and lefty models are hard to find.
It's really not that hard to learn Either side.
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Old January 14, 2015, 09:37 PM   #9
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I've had five left hand bolt action rifles. I bought two identical used rifles at gun shows and three new left hand bolt action rifles from dealers. I sold the less accurate used rifle. No risk of a fired case hitting me in the face with the left hand bolt rifles. My pump shotguns are all right hand 870's and they all eject the fired shell straight to the right and never touching me.
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Old January 14, 2015, 09:48 PM   #10
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Well, this isn't the easiest way but it works. 1st of all I've always shot a rifle left handed,(nothing like having a hot shell or 2 out of a M16 go down your shirt before you learn to button it all the way to the neck), but with pistols I used to close my left eye and shoot righty. Then last spring I managed to break 3 bones in 6 places in my right wrist. Fortunately I've always been semi ambidextrous cause now I can't use my right hand to fire a gun without inflicting some pain, so I'm a lefty all the way when it comes to firearms.
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Old January 15, 2015, 04:29 AM   #11
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Ok so from what I gather, I was right about longguns being shot lefty.

Handguns it seems the goal is being able to shoot ambi, but what should I make my primary? I.e. should I make left primary but right off hand?
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Old January 15, 2015, 05:10 AM   #12
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^^^^
I did that for a while, but I went back to shooting with my right hand as primary. I shoot about as accurately with my left, but I'm just more comfortable shooting handguns right handed. It isn't that hard for me to lean my head and use my left eye, even using the weaver stance. It's only a couple of inches of head movement.

Even with the nerve problem on my right side, I still shot rifles right handed until about five years ago. Then one day I was looking at a doe through my scope and got tired of my depth perception changing, so I switched shoulders. I took a couple of rifles (one scoped and one with irons) to the range and started shooting lefty. Sometimes it's good to break yourself down. I actually cleaned up some bad habits in form by re-teaching myself how to shoot.

Last edited by 30wcf; January 15, 2015 at 05:21 AM.
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Old January 15, 2015, 08:44 AM   #13
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No reason to be turning your head to get left eye on sights with a handgun in isosceles stance.

Change your grip angle slightly to align your sights with the center of your chest.
Sounds like your still lining up your sights in line with your right arm forming a right angled triangle.

https://www.usconcealedcarry.com/fin...ooting-stance/

Check out this image; you need to offset your grip a bit IMO.
Dont change your primary pistol hand.
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Old January 15, 2015, 08:56 AM   #14
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Interesting, when I was learning I remember watching some of Todd Jarret's videos. He had mentioned keeping the weapon in line with your forearm. Maybe I misinterpreted.

Edit: According to the article I have been using the in-line grip as mentioned by Todd Jarret. I'll have to try offset.
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Old January 15, 2015, 09:25 AM   #15
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Ok so here are my findings.

Offset grip works well. Instead of centering the web of your hand on the backstrap you use the left most part. It lines up perfectly with my eye. The only thing I am weary of is that there is noticeably less contact with my palm. The bottom of the backstrap is not making contact.

With the inline grip all of my palm makes contact.

I'll have to shoot both ways to see how this affects recoil and shot timings.
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Old January 15, 2015, 09:25 AM   #16
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If the preferred method that is designed for the majority of people doesn't work for you, use what does.
Just about any method will do the job with enough practice.
When I used to attend regular archery 3D matches, one of the guys pulled his compound bow in a very goofy looking manner.
Folks were constantly trying to correct him.
If I had tried his technique, the result probably would have been a dislocated shoulder and hitting trees instead of targets.
But he was astoundingly accurate with his method, easily out scoring most of the critics.
If it works, go for it.
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Old January 15, 2015, 11:16 AM   #17
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Well I am not going to be able to get to the range until the weekend. Before I start practicing the new off-set hold can anyone tell me if the lack of contact with my lower palm will hinder my ability to get multiple shots on target in a timely manner?

Maybe the better question is is there a downside to the off-set grip vs in-line?

Edit: I understand that I need to do whatever works, but some methods have limitations that no amount of practice will get rid of.

I.e. If you're holding your pistol with just your thumb and middle finger you'll never get follow up shots on target as fast as say using your entire hand, it doesn't matter how much practice you have there are physical limitations keeping you from doing so.

Last edited by TheeAntic; January 15, 2015 at 11:22 AM.
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Old January 15, 2015, 11:51 AM   #18
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Quote:
Originally Posted by TheeAntic
...Before I start practicing the new off-set hold can anyone tell me if the lack of contact with my lower palm will hinder my ability to get multiple shots on target in a timely manner?

Maybe the better question is is there a downside to the off-set grip vs in-line?...
It might.

Really, turning the head is a better idea than changing one's grip. A good shooting grip is one of the pillars of marksmanship.

I teach with a group of people, all graduates of Gunsite and other major shooting schools. One of my fellow instructors is right handed and left eye dominant. He holds his head erect, but turns it slightly to his right to line up the sights with his left eye.

It has worked for him through multiple classes at Gunsite and elsewhere. It works for the cross-dominant students we teach that technique to. It works for me when I shoot left handed (since I'm right handed and right eye dominant). And it can work with both an Isosceles and a Weaver stance (my friend shoots Weaver).
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Old January 15, 2015, 12:25 PM   #19
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Frank Ettin
Really, turning the head is a better idea than changing one's grip. A good shooting grip is one of the pillars of marksmanship.

I teach with a group of people, all graduates of Gunsite and other major shooting schools. One of my fellow instructors is right handed and left eye dominant. He holds his head erect, but turns it slightly to his right to line up the sights with his left eye.
I'm glad to hear you say that. If that's what people are teaching than I'll keep doing what I've been doing, turning my head.

The offset grip leaves a huge gap at the rear of the pistol with no hand contact, seems detrimental to getting multiple shots on target quickly.

Edit: I forgot to add that even with an offset grip I have to turn my head slightly, eliminating all benefits of this grip.
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Old January 15, 2015, 04:05 PM   #20
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There's no need to change your handgun grip when all you have to do is slightly shift the gun to the left.

It won't make any difference if your forearm isn't "aligned" perfectly

Eye dominance really only matters with rifles
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Old January 16, 2015, 01:57 AM   #21
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being cross dominant

I'm right handed and have a left master eye. I shoot handguns right handed and (most often) sight with the left/master eye. I shoot long guns right handed off the right shoulder, and close my left eye.

I instructed firearms at the local regional police academy on and off since 1988 and in the ANG as a Combat Arms Training Specialist for 10 years and as an LEO since 1982. In my observation about 20% of the population has a cross dominant master eye.

When shooting rifle, I fire from the right shoulder, close my left eye, and shoot with the right eye. Some people (10%?) can't independently close one eye or the other and leave the other eye open (often can't close the master eye) and I'm not sure what the solution is for those folks when they're shooting a long gun. Some people have a greater natural tendency toward bilateralism/ambidexterity than others, and some can fire off the weak shoulder with some ability, but most people can't do that.

I know a minority of instructors try to take a cross-dominant shooter (right handed -- left master eye, for example) and try to teach them to shoot left handed, but I see absolutely no reason to do that UNLESS their primary weapon is a long gun and they can't close their eyes independently.

But, everybody's vision and circumstance is different. A lot depends on the binocularity & convergence of YOUR vision. You'll probably have to experiment a little bit to find out what works for YOU.
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Old January 16, 2015, 11:12 AM   #22
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I'm the same as the guy in Post #5. Came by it naturally. I suspect that if most people don't overthink and just do what comes naturally, they end up doing what's best for them. It's just my humble opinion, but the scientists agree.....
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Old February 7, 2015, 10:46 PM   #23
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I'll second post #22.
I have never given it any thought, but I do shoot pistols with both eyes open right handed. Rifles and shotguns right handed and left eye closed, just like #21. Haven't ever really given it much thought, just how it is. My oldest son is the same and as mentioned in that post can not close his left eye independent of his right. To be perfectly honest I have no clue how he does it, but he hits the paper shooting right hand rifles and the clays with a shotgun. *shrugs*
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