The Firing Line Forums

Go Back   The Firing Line Forums > The Skunkworks > The Smithy

Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread
Old November 24, 2019, 12:16 PM   #1
tpcollins
Senior Member
 
Join Date: February 18, 2009
Location: SE Michigan
Posts: 537
How do I lighten the trigger on Ruger M77 Mark II

My .243 Ruger M77 Mark II has a trigger pull just over 5 pounds and I’ve always had a problem getting it to shoot good.

I’d like to get it closer to 2 1/2 - 2 3/4 pounds if possible but there no screws to remove - looks like I’d have to drive some pins out.

Just wondering if this is doable and what/where do I start? Thanks.
__________________
What direction did that last shot at Kennedy come from?
tpcollins is offline  
Old November 24, 2019, 01:49 PM   #2
T. O'Heir
Senior Member
 
Join Date: February 13, 2002
Location: Canada
Posts: 11,576
2 1/2 - 2 3/4 pounds is too light for a hunting rifle. Ruger quit making an adjustable trigger due to frivolous law suits. My .243(not a Ruger) is at about 3 pounds and just moving my carcass while sitting on the ground set it off.
However, Timney sells a replacement trigger for $147.99. $134.95 if you buy it from Midway. I believe there are installation instructions on Timney's site
Brownell's sells a drop in replacement adjustable trigger for $134.99. Comes left or right for some reason.
And Wolff Springs will sell you a spring kit for $9.99. I believe there are installation instructions on their site too. Ruger really doesn't want you doing anything. www.gunsprings.com
__________________
Spelling and grammar count!
T. O'Heir is offline  
Old November 24, 2019, 02:48 PM   #3
jmr40
Senior Member
 
Join Date: June 15, 2008
Location: Georgia
Posts: 9,717
The newer trigger used on the Hawkeye is much better. But I seriously doubt if Ruger will sell you one or even install it on the older rifle. I really like the factory trigger for it's rugged durability. It is possible to replace springs and improve them, but finding someone who knows what they are doing can make things a lot better with files and stones. I wouldn't try that myself though.
__________________
"If you're still doing things the same way you were doing them 10 years ago, you're doing it wrong"

Winston Churchill
jmr40 is offline  
Old November 24, 2019, 03:33 PM   #4
Unclenick
Staff
 
Join Date: March 4, 2005
Location: Ohio
Posts: 16,704
Ruger CYA on triggers is a fact of life, and the only Ruger I've owned for which I've never had to do anything to the trigger is a used Mk I bull barrel target pistol with Micro sights and aftermarket target grips that my grandfather bought for me for $68 when I was 16. I still have it and it is still a great shooting gun. I've had no trouble working on Ruger revolvers to improve their triggers, but have never messed with a 77 Mk II trigger and probably would not because its simplicity is on the order of that in pre-AccuTrigger Savages. I lightened one of those by putting a simple Rifle Basix trigger on it, and though it seemed fine in dry-firing, I had it fire on closing the bolt during one of the twenty test-flight rounds, so I moved to a multi-lever aftermarket trigger on it.

I'm sure spending more money to upgrade a used gun is probably not too appealing, but if you are thinking of it, this thread may be of interest to you.
__________________
Gunsite Orange Hat Family Member
CMP Certified GSM Master Instructor
NRA Certified Rifle Instructor
NRA Benefactor Member and Golden Eagle
Unclenick is online now  
Old November 24, 2019, 05:23 PM   #5
Nathan
Senior Member
 
Join Date: July 1, 2001
Posts: 4,790
Jard as well as several other companies make improved replacement triggers. I would bet a quality Smith could tune it for a reasonable price.
Nathan is offline  
Old November 24, 2019, 06:53 PM   #6
FrankenMauser
Senior Member
 
Join Date: August 25, 2008
Location: Potatoes and Hops
Posts: 11,983
The best way to improve a Ruger 77 Mk II trigger is to replace it with a Timney trigger and sear.
There's so much over-engagement built in to the factory parts that they aren't worth messing with unless you're dead broke and have nothing else to do with your time.

The Timneys are adjustable and come with a lighter spring. Between the screw adjustment and the two springs (Timney supplied spring, and the factory spring), it can be adjusted to suit almost any shooter.
I don't even bother with the light spring. Just getting a clean, crisp trigger makes all the difference in the world.

Yes, you'll need to push some pins out. (If "driving" comes into play, there's something wrong. The pins should push out relatively easily.)
And, in the case of the Timney triggers, you'll need to do a little fitting for proper operation of the safety.


Edit: I just scrolled back up and saw some prices listed for the Timneys. I've never had to pay that much. They go on sale often enough that I paid less than $100 for each of mine.
__________________
Don't even try it. It's even worse than the internet would lead you to believe.
FrankenMauser is offline  
Old November 24, 2019, 09:26 PM   #7
Scorch
Senior Member
 
Join Date: February 13, 2006
Location: Washington state
Posts: 13,758
As a smith, I usually recommend to just buy a Rifle Basix or Timney trigger when people want a lighter trigger pull. Can I do a trigger job on a Ruger 77 Mk II? Absolutely! $150. And a Rifle Basix trigger is under $100, so I steer people in that direction. Ruger's triggers are too soft to hold a good crisp release more than about 500-1000 rounds, aftermarket triggers will be good for many thousand more.
__________________
Never try to educate someone who resists knowledge at all costs.
But what do I know?
Summit Arms Services
Taylor Machine
Scorch is offline  
Old November 24, 2019, 10:35 PM   #8
pete2
Senior Member
 
Join Date: May 15, 2012
Location: Texas
Posts: 2,070
I bought a 77 MK2 in 1994. went to the range to sight in, couldn't, trigger too hard to pull. Took it to a gunsmith, now 2-1/2#. About right for a hunting rifle. Depending on the trigger, I can do up to about 4-1/2. With a single stage pull 2-1/2 is about right.
pete2 is offline  
Old November 28, 2019, 10:38 AM   #9
Josh Smith
Senior Member
 
Join Date: November 5, 2000
Location: Wabash IN
Posts: 741
Looks like there's a trigger spring in there that could be replaced with something lighter. I've never worked on one, but it's a common design.

Crispness is more important than weight. Look at the sear mating surfaces. They should have neutral or slightly positive angles of engagement (negative can make 'em slip) and be polished to mirror finishes.

Or, as was said above, a replacement set would probably be superior. I know I went that route a couple times when the quality of stock parts was not worth polishing.

Regards,
Josh
__________________
Is Your Mosin Shooting High?

Sights for the Mosin-Nagant
Josh Smith is offline  
Old November 28, 2019, 11:49 AM   #10
std7mag
Senior Member
 
Join Date: June 23, 2013
Location: Central Taxylvania..
Posts: 2,732
For my 2 Ruger 77 MKII i got the spring kit from Wolfe and honed the sear.
Unless you really know what your doing, do not attempt to hone!
Timney or Rifle Basix is by far the better option.

Unlike T.O. all my hunting triggers are set to 2 to 2-1/2 lbs.
Don't know what the heck he was doing to get a 3lb trigger to go off while "moving around"!
Things are just different in Canada, i guess.
__________________
This country was founded on two beliefs.
And I'm pretty sure pork rinds was one of them!
std7mag is offline  
Old November 29, 2019, 10:44 AM   #11
603Country
Senior Member
 
Join Date: January 6, 2011
Location: Thornton, Texas
Posts: 3,616
I have a Ruger Hawkeye, and when I got it and used it a bit, the trigger pull was heavier than I like. I called the nearest gunsmith, and he said to bring it over. I did so, and said I’d leave it with him until he got a chance to work on it. He said to help myself to some coffee and he’d fix it right now. He put the gun upside down in a barrel vise and removed the stock. He than dug around in a small drawer till he found just the spring he was looking for. In a matter of less than a minute, he had swapped out the spring. He put the stock back on, had me test the pull weight, charged me $10, and off I went.

The trigger spring is soooo easy to replace. Obviously, you will need the new spring.

I will assume that the Mark II version has the same type trigger, but I no longer have a Mark II 77, so can’t check.

Full disclosure, some years later I put a Timney trigger on it, and it was an upgrade.
603Country is online now  
Old November 29, 2019, 12:14 PM   #12
dahermit
Senior Member
 
Join Date: October 28, 2006
Location: South Central Michigan...near
Posts: 5,738
Quote:
Originally Posted by 603Country View Post
I have a Ruger Hawkeye, and when I got it and used it a bit, the trigger pull was heavier than I like. I called the nearest gunsmith, and he said to bring it over. I did so, and said I’d leave it with him until he got a chance to work on it. He said to help myself to some coffee and he’d fix it right now. He put the gun upside down in a barrel vise and removed the stock. He than dug around in a small drawer till he found just the spring he was looking for. In a matter of less than a minute, he had swapped out the spring. He put the stock back on, had me test the pull weight, charged me $10, and off I went.

The trigger spring is soooo easy to replace. Obviously, you will need the new spring.

I will assume that the Mark II version has the same type trigger, but I no longer have a Mark II 77, so can’t check.

Full disclosure, some years later I put a Timney trigger on it, and it was an upgrade.
I have "lightened" the trigger on a MKII M77 by cutting the spring and streaching it. It was a modest improvement, but it was "improved".
dahermit is offline  
Old December 3, 2019, 10:24 AM   #13
tpcollins
Senior Member
 
Join Date: February 18, 2009
Location: SE Michigan
Posts: 537
After my bout with Old Timer’s Disease faded away, I realized that I had replaced the factory trigger spring with a lighter one from Granger last year! So last week I ordered the next lighter spring which came yesterday.

After installing the new one I’m still at the 5 1/4 - 5 1/2 pound mark - same as the lighter Granger spring from last year.

After looking at the photos of the Timney triggers online, I didn’t see the red light weight Timney spring in the bubble packs - so I sent them an email and just asked if the spring is supposed to be included in the packs.

Well the CS service gal must have misinterpreted my email and asked for my address and they’d sent out a replacement - whoopee!

But I’m not convinced a lighter spring in my factory Ruger trigger is going to make the pull any lighter. It just feels like there’s too much “bite” holding the sear and trigger. If the lightweight spring doesn’t help, I’ll order the Timney trigger kit.

For the heck of it I might put the old Ruger factory spring in just to see what it’s set at. I do know I was never happy with this M77 at the range - trigger pull could have attributed to that.
__________________
What direction did that last shot at Kennedy come from?
tpcollins is offline  
Old December 3, 2019, 02:18 PM   #14
tpcollins
Senior Member
 
Join Date: February 18, 2009
Location: SE Michigan
Posts: 537
I decided to pull the trigger assy apart again and installed the original factory trigger and I get 5 1/2 to 5 3/4 pound pull.

Not sure how to upload a pic but I found a diagram in a 24hourcampfire thread (post #8 down) and part of the problem appears to be in the center of the pic. When the sear is set by the trigger, the bolt firing pin part closes against the top backside of the sear. When the trigger clears the sear, the sear drops down and the firing pin moves forward.

I’m convinced that I could reset the trigger and sear without the trigger spring, close the bolt, and the trigger pull would still be too much even without the spring. Either milling the edges which I can’t do at those tolerances or the Timney #1100 trigger replacement is going to be much only option. I don’t think a lighter firing pin spring in the bolt would be a viable option.

https://www.24hourcampfire.com/ubbth...n_a_Ruger_M77_
__________________
What direction did that last shot at Kennedy come from?
tpcollins is offline  
Old December 4, 2019, 04:37 PM   #15
Unclenick
Staff
 
Join Date: March 4, 2005
Location: Ohio
Posts: 16,704
A light striker spring tends to lead to increased velocity SD by not getting the primers igniting as consistently quickly.
__________________
Gunsite Orange Hat Family Member
CMP Certified GSM Master Instructor
NRA Certified Rifle Instructor
NRA Benefactor Member and Golden Eagle
Unclenick is online now  
Old December 5, 2019, 03:00 PM   #16
Scorch
Senior Member
 
Join Date: February 13, 2006
Location: Washington state
Posts: 13,758
Quote:
But I’m not convinced a lighter spring in my factory Ruger trigger is going to make the pull any lighter.
It won't. The issue is the material the factory trigger and sear are made of. The Rifle Basix trigger or Timney are hard and smooth (as opposed to the factory trigger and sear which are soft and rough).
Quote:
When the trigger clears the sear, the sear drops down and the firing pin moves forward.
Same as most popular bolt action rifles (Rem 700, Win M70, Savage 110, etc). It's called sear over-ride.
Quote:
I don’t think a lighter firing pin spring in the bolt would be a viable option.
Sounds like a good way to increase your rate of misfires.
__________________
Never try to educate someone who resists knowledge at all costs.
But what do I know?
Summit Arms Services
Taylor Machine
Scorch is offline  
Old December 5, 2019, 07:12 PM   #17
dahermit
Senior Member
 
Join Date: October 28, 2006
Location: South Central Michigan...near
Posts: 5,738
Quote:
But I’m not convinced a lighter spring in my factory Ruger trigger is going to make the pull any lighter.
Less force from the trigger spring to overcome results in less force to move the trigger. Not a theory, been there, done that.
dahermit is offline  
Old December 5, 2019, 09:35 PM   #18
Colorado Redneck
Senior Member
 
Join Date: January 6, 2008
Location: Northeast Colorado
Posts: 1,725
I had a Ruger MKII that had a typical heavy pull for that model gun. Took it to the best gunsmith in this area, and asked him to replace the factory trigger with a Timney. He growled at me saying he could do a trigger job on the factory unit that would be perfectly satisfactory, and if I wasn't happy he would install a Timney for free. 2 months later he had it done. He did a great job for exactly what the Timney trigger itself would have cost me. Either way, Ruger triggers are annoying. I bought a Ruger Hawkeye Predator that had an adjustable two stage trigger that was great.
Colorado Redneck is online now  
Old Today, 05:15 PM   #19
Nathan
Senior Member
 
Join Date: July 1, 2001
Posts: 4,790
If/when I do it, my money says this is best...JARD
Nathan is offline  
Reply

Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off

Forum Jump


All times are GMT -5. The time now is 06:51 PM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.7
Copyright ©2000 - 2019, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.
This site and contents, including all posts, Copyright © 1998-2018 S.W.A.T. Magazine
Copyright Complaints: Please direct DMCA Takedown Notices to the registered agent: thefiringline.com
Contact Us
Page generated in 0.08306 seconds with 9 queries