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Old June 11, 2024, 11:01 AM   #26
Webleymkv
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Quote:
Originally posted by Shadow9mm
Quote:
Originally Posted by The Verminator View Post
Almost everybody has a glass patio door.

What do you do about that?

They don't have to break your steel entry door.
Add security film, like window tint, but keeps the glass from blowing out if struck. Get one made rated for hurricanes, you can hardly beat through it with baseball bat. There are options.
While I certainly don't think that having a home defense firearm, regardless of how secure your home is, is a bad idea, I will add that the modern plexiglass used in most patio doors isn't as easy to break as one might think. I've seen several rather humorous videos of would-be criminals throwing heavy objects as such glass only to have it literally bounce off and hit them in the face. Also, the pane of glass isn't the weakest point of the sliding type patio doors, rather its the flimsy little sheet metal latch that most adults of moderate strength could rip free fairly easily. Fortunately this is a fairly easy fix as all you need to do is get the thickest piece of dowel rod you can find, cut it to the appropriate length, and place in in the bottom track between the door and frame.
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Old June 11, 2024, 11:24 AM   #27
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Originally Posted by Webleymkv View Post
Also, the pane of glass isn't the weakest point of the sliding type patio doors, rather its the flimsy little sheet metal latch that most adults of moderate strength could rip free fairly easily. Fortunately this is a fairly easy fix as all you need to do is get the thickest piece of dowel rod you can find, cut it to the appropriate length, and place in in the bottom track between the door and frame.
That's exactly what I've done with mine.

However, if I were a crook I'm thinking I could just use a glass cutter and make a hole to stick a little rod in and pry out the dowel.
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Old June 11, 2024, 12:45 PM   #28
Webleymkv
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Originally posted by The Verminator
That's exactly what I've done with mine.

However, if I were a crook I'm thinking I could just use a glass cutter and make a hole to stick a little rod in and pry out the dowel.
If you make the rod long enough that it fits tightly between the door and frame, prying it out would be more difficult. Also, I specifically stated that the dowel should be placed in the bottom track because the track surrounding the dowel will make it more difficult to get a little rod or other such tool in position to pry the dowel out.

The fact of the matter is that if someone wants into your house badly enough and has enough time and effort to devote to it, they're probably going to get in. The point of home security isn't to make your home completely impregnable, but rather to make it difficult and time consuming enough that you have sufficient time and warning to respond or, preferably, the intruder gives up and seeks easier targets elsewhere.
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Old June 12, 2024, 07:59 AM   #29
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Originally Posted by Webleymkv View Post
If you make the rod long enough that it fits tightly between the door and frame, prying it out would be more difficult. Also, I specifically stated that the dowel should be placed in the bottom track because the track surrounding the dowel will make it more difficult to get a little rod or other such tool in position to pry the dowel out.

The fact of the matter is that if someone wants into your house badly enough and has enough time and effort to devote to it, they're probably going to get in. The point of home security isn't to make your home completely impregnable, but rather to make it difficult and time consuming enough that you have sufficient time and warning to respond or, preferably, the intruder gives up and seeks easier targets elsewhere.
Nailed it.
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Old June 12, 2024, 06:14 PM   #30
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Hidden gems?
I'll take one of my HK P7s; accurate, easy to shoot, heavy to absorb recoil
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Old June 12, 2024, 07:32 PM   #31
The Verminator
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Originally Posted by Webleymkv View Post
If you make the rod long enough that it fits tightly between the door and frame, prying it out would be more difficult. Also, I specifically stated that the dowel should be placed in the bottom track because the track surrounding the dowel will make it more difficult to get a little rod or other such tool in position to pry the dowel out.

The fact of the matter is that if someone wants into your house badly enough and has enough time and effort to devote to it, they're probably going to get in. The point of home security isn't to make your home completely impregnable, but rather to make it difficult and time consuming enough that you have sufficient time and warning to respond or, preferably, the intruder gives up and seeks easier targets elsewhere.
Well, I could easily make an L-shaped rod to hook the dowel.

But........one can always duct tape it in to make it really difficult to lift it out.

Which I do.

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Old June 13, 2024, 08:20 AM   #32
Skans
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Actually, a tube-fed Marlin 22LR could work for home defense. Its powerful enough to punch a good size hole through an old steel oil barrel.

Personally I prefer a 10mm handgun - Witness Stock 10mm with Lehigh Defense solid copper extreme penetrator rounds. Some thugs have gotten a little smarter and have gone to wearing body armor during burglaries.
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Old June 13, 2024, 08:18 PM   #33
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A set of Comtacs 3’s and you can use anything without worrying about blowing your ears out. If it come down to your life or that of your family, noise doesn’t even enter into the equation.
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Old June 13, 2024, 09:52 PM   #34
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This thing takes Glock magazines, is extremely affordable (~$500),
New Glocks are $450-$500 for the single stack G43 and G48. I just paid $500 OTD for a G48 MOS. New double stacks such as the G19 are $500-$550 and used Glocks are $350-$400. Why pay more for the knockoff when you can get the real thing for less money.

Seriously, right now the best value in a HD handgun is a used Glock.
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Old June 14, 2024, 02:07 AM   #35
TruthTellers
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A .410 in either the Shockwave or KSG. Compact, light, low recoil, effective.

Wadcutters in a big bore revolver. Big hole, low noise, doesn't go thru walls well.
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Old Yesterday, 10:57 AM   #36
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Seems like a lot of the "gems" that were cheap under Bush II got very expensive under Obama and stayed that way. Otherwise, I would recommend a cheap AK and a $200 1000-round box of Tulammo.

I would never defend my family with a pistol unless I couldn't use a long gun. As for hearing protection, I keep electronic muffs next to my rifle. I won't use a shotgun. I want 30 rounds in my mag.
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Old Yesterday, 11:21 AM   #37
The Verminator
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Originally Posted by TruthTellers View Post
A .410 in either the Shockwave or KSG. Compact, light, low recoil, effective.

Wadcutters in a big bore revolver. Big hole, low noise, doesn't go thru walls well.
So you're ok with not being able to shoot through walls while the hoodlums are shooting through walls to kill you?

Nope........I may need to shoot through walls.
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Old Yesterday, 11:25 AM   #38
Swifty Morgan
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I totally agree with that. Let's all go on the web, watch police shootings, and see how worried they are about hitting the innocent at a distance.

Sometimes you have to weigh risks.

I think any round that won't go through a wall is likely to fail to penetrate a criminal very well.

I use an Eastern bloc rifle for home protection.
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Old Yesterday, 01:26 PM   #39
Webleymkv
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Quote:
Originally posted by Truth Tellers
Wadcutters in a big bore revolver. Big hole, low noise, doesn't go thru walls well.
While I wouldn't count too heavily on them not going through walls (at least if were talking about modern sheetrock walls), I'd say that wadcutters are highly underrated in general, particularly in calibers which have trouble reaching sufficient velocity for hollowpoints to reliably expand like standard-pressure .38 Special or .32 S&W Long.

Quote:
Originally posted by The Verminator
So you're ok with not being able to shoot through walls while the hoodlums are shooting through walls to kill you?

Nope........I may need to shoot through walls.
About the only ammunition that won't reliably penetrate modern walls is either frangible bullets like Glasers or light loads of birdshot in a shotgun and even these will often penetrate at least one interior wall of modern design (studs and sheetrock, plaster and lath is a little more resistant but not much). That being said, outside of a very limited number of very specific circumstances, shooting through a wall at a target you cannot see, and thus cannot positively identify, is generally considered to be a very bad, and likely legally questionable, idea.
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Old Yesterday, 01:38 PM   #40
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Since the .22 mag projectile is crimped into the case in a different manner than the .22 lr, it may be a bit more reliable in ignition than the heel crimped .22 lr but I am suspect none the less.
The kind of crimp on the bullet has nothing to do with the reliability of rimfire ignition.

Centerfires are more reliable because of the consistency of the priming system. The primer compound is in one spot, and is reliably crushed against the primer anvil (boxer priming) or the case "anvil" (Berdan priming)

Rimfire rounds are made differently. It was long ago I saw it done, but I'm pretty sure they still do it about the same way.

The case is formed, with its hollow rim, then a drop of the priming compound, as a liquid is placed inside, and the case is spun so that the liquid flows into the hollow rim by centrifugal force. Usually, this results in an even distribution of the primer compound all around the inside of the rim.

However, its not 100 percent perfect, and sometimes, gaps will happen, and if that does, AND random chance puts that "blank spot" under the firing pin when you shoot, then the round doesn't go off.

Rechambering the round so the firing pin hits a different spot on the rim nearly always results in the "bad" round firing. Additionally, since the system relies on crushing the rim against the steel of your barrel/chamber, if things are "right" in that fit, ignition problems can result. This is why rimfires are, overall, slightly less reliable than centerfires, and that difference, though small, makes them a poor choice for self defense use when it comes to firing reliably. It has nothing to do with how the bullet is held in the case.

The heel type bullet, crimped into the case is more "fragile", meaning it is more easily bent, or made loose by rough handling, which may give feeding and chambering issues, but that has nothing to do with primer ignition.

My personal "home defense" system won't work for most people, or anyone who cares about what their property looks like. Between a back injury that meant I couldn't mow my law, and a family dispute between my wife and her brother, he cut off irrigation water to my place (which I still have to pay for, though I don't get any ) my "lawn" is high desert organic, so I literally live "in the weeds" and there are several non running cars and a truck parked to serve as a barrier fence near the road. The house is in shabby shape, roof needs repair, there is no patio and no glass doors. Additionally, there is a large black dog, totally unused to anyone but us on the property, who is a mix of Australian Kelpie and I think Tasmanian devil. There is literally nothing worth stealing visible anywhere, (and damn little worth stealing inside the house).

Additionally, anyone getting past the dog would face any one (or more) of the firearms I own, or the various "decorator" swords that are within reach in most rooms of my small house.

Shotguns are good choices, though less maneuverable than a handgun. I don't consider rifles as home defense choices for inside the house. Suppressors are out (for me) simply not going to put up with the cost and legal hassle that are the current legal requirements.

Additionally, if you use a suppressed weapon for defense (which is your right, and nothing legally wrong with that) its going to be made to look really bad in court, should it come to that.

As for an "overlooked gem" for a home defense weapon, consider a medium frame .38 revolver. I prefer the S&Ws but I also have a Colt snubbie which is quite comforting to have in a pocket when things go bump in the night.
12ga coach gun inside the bedroom door, .45 auto within reach when I'm in bed. So far, so good!
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Old Yesterday, 08:15 PM   #41
Swifty Morgan
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Silencers cost way more than they should, but the ATF is moving very fast on applications right now.
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