The Firing Line Forums

Go Back   The Firing Line Forums > The Skunkworks > Handloading, Reloading, and Bullet Casting

Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread
Old October 19, 2011, 02:32 PM   #26
wncchester
Senior Member
 
Join Date: December 1, 2002
Posts: 2,832
To see what seating depth changes do to peak pressure in rifles check these links:

http://thefiringline.com/forums/show...=1#post4746057

http://www.hornady.com/ballistics-resource/internal
wncchester is offline  
Old October 19, 2011, 09:05 PM   #27
300magman
Senior Member
 
Join Date: September 12, 2008
Posts: 714
Well to this point in my reloading adventures I've never taken a load beyond book values, and I haven't really had to with any of the hunting rifles I've loaded for, to get the velocities that I wanted. But in this case I was curious if there were any "unforseen" hazards that I might encounter, should I decide to push the envelope a bit.

My main desire to do so, is the restriction on any caliber larger than .224 for varmint hunting in my area....I am not wanting to run any dangerous nuclear level loads, but if my rifle appears to easily digest nearly "book max" loads I would be curious to see how much more it can take before exhibiting any warning signs of overpressure (that is, if accuracy hangs on) ... I just thought it would be smart to consult with others, who are more experienced, to see if I was overlooking anything.




Anyway, on to actual results. Testing up to nearly book max loads, I find my velocities somewhat lower than the average predictions of the three manuals I consult for load data. I assume it is because of the longer OAL that I am using; as well, it appears that my fireformed (and neck sized only) winchester brass has Much more case capacity than standard.
300magman is offline  
Old October 19, 2011, 09:31 PM   #28
wncchester
Senior Member
 
Join Date: December 1, 2002
Posts: 2,832
"it appears that my fireformed (and neck sized only) winchester brass has Much more case capacity than standard. "

Well, that's one possiblity. Then there's the possiblity of a larger chamber and/or a looser bore than the book test gun. And different powder lots, primer lots, different bore surface, different barrel length, testing on a cooler day or at a lower altitude, etc, etc. Or a combination of several of those possibilities. ??
wncchester is offline  
Old October 19, 2011, 10:05 PM   #29
300magman
Senior Member
 
Join Date: September 12, 2008
Posts: 714
Quote:
Well, that's one possiblity. Then there's the possiblity of a larger chamber and/or a looser bore than the book test gun. And different powder lots, primer lots, different bore surface, different barrel length, testing on a cooler day or at a lower altitude, etc, etc. Or a combination of several of those possibilities. ??


I never said I was ruling out any of those things. When I said it appears that my one fired brass appears to have more case capacity than standard, I mean to say that I've measured. ... but wouldn't that make sense for once fired brass anyway, even if the lot of winchester brass I started with wasn't particularly roomy to begin with.
300magman is offline  
Old October 20, 2011, 07:52 AM   #30
black mamba
Senior Member
 
Join Date: September 13, 2011
Location: O'Fallon, MO
Posts: 812
Yes, once fired brass should give an indication of the chamber size, and if yours is large, then it would need a little more powder to reach the same velocity.

It's not cast in stone (nothing seems to be in handloading!) but I read somewhere that the additional water capacity of your case should be divided by 3 to give an idea of how much more powder you should add to give the same velocity.
EXAMPLE: Your once fired case holds 1.5 gr of water more than standard, then you can only go up .5 gr of powder, not the whole 1.5 grains.
black mamba is offline  
Reply

Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off

Forum Jump


All times are GMT -5. The time now is 12:14 AM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.7
Copyright ©2000 - 2019, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.
This site and contents, including all posts, Copyright © 1998-2018 S.W.A.T. Magazine
Copyright Complaints: Please direct DMCA Takedown Notices to the registered agent: thefiringline.com
Contact Us
Page generated in 0.05125 seconds with 8 queries