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Old May 22, 2020, 07:28 PM   #1
Aguila Blanca
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1911 triggers

According to the Ordnance Department drawings, the trigger shoe for the M1911A1 was steel, and was attached to the trigger bow by crimping in two locations.

The newer 80 series Colts use an aluminum trigger shoe. First question: Does anyone know what would be an appropriate aluminum alloy for use as a trigger shoe?

Second question: There's no crimp visible from the sides of the trigger shoe. There are two round-ish indentations in the back of the shoe that effectively close up the slot the bow fits into. Does anyone know how that operation is accomplished? Is it just a different crimp, or is it TIG welded inside the slot?

Thanks.
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Old May 22, 2020, 09:30 PM   #2
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Old May 23, 2020, 10:32 AM   #3
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Early M1911A1 triggers were a one-piece affair, fully machined.
Are you trying to make a trigger, or ?
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Old May 23, 2020, 01:53 PM   #4
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I would think the trigger is pinned to the bow.
What you are calling the shoe is actually the trigger. Any aluminum alloy could be used if pinned in place. For that matter, plastic could be used.
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Old May 23, 2020, 08:09 PM   #5
Aguila Blanca
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Quote:
Originally Posted by RickB
Early M1911A1 triggers were a one-piece affair, fully machined.
I have reprints of the Ordnance Department drawings from two different sources. The trigger bow and trigger pad are separate parts in both sets. There are several revisions to each, but for both sets the original drawing date is 1942.

No I'm not trying to make a trigger. I'm much too lazy to do that when I can buy triggers for reasonable prices. I'm just trying to understand how the manufacturing process evolved.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Bill DeShivs
What you are calling the shoe is actually the trigger.
The Ordnance drawing calls it the "pad." Most folks of my acquaintance call it the shoe.
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Old May 24, 2020, 07:29 AM   #6
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Quote:
. The trigger bow and trigger pad are separate parts in both sets. There are several revisions to each, but for both sets the original drawing date is 1942.
Jerry Kuhnhausen refers to the unit as the trigger assembly. He notes that it has two to four parts depending on whether it is adjustable or not (Finger piece/pad, bow, an assembly pin on some triggers and an adjusting screw on some.) “Trigger bows and finger pieces are assembled by pinning, staking, or brazing.”
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Old May 24, 2020, 09:10 AM   #7
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You raise a good point AguilaBlanca. Darn if I know. The manufacturing process and materials used is always interesting.
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Old May 24, 2020, 10:42 AM   #8
RickB
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Quote:
Early M1911A1 triggers were a one-piece affair, fully machined.

I have reprints of the Ordnance Department drawings from two different sources. The trigger bow and trigger pad are separate parts in both sets. There are several revisions to each, but for both sets the original drawing date is 1942.
The one-piece, fully machined trigger may have lasted only until 1942 (my Colt is a '42), to be replaced by a "stamped" trigger.
The stamped trigger appears to be two parts, with the bow staked to the shoe, creating the round-ish depressions.
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Old May 24, 2020, 01:06 PM   #9
Bill DeShivs
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I would sure like to see pictures of a one-piece 1911 trigger assembly!
Making one would be an exercise in futility.
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Old May 24, 2020, 01:24 PM   #10
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Quote:
Originally Posted by RickB
The one-piece, fully machined trigger may have lasted only until 1942 (my Colt is a '42), to be replaced by a "stamped" trigger.
The stamped trigger appears to be two parts, with the bow staked to the shoe, creating the round-ish depressions.
The late model trigger I have in front of me is clearly two pieces, but the profile of the pad doesn't match that shown on the Ordnance Department drawing. And the pad is aluminum, not steel as called for in the Ordnance drawing.

If I am reading the Ordnance Department drawing correctly, the two pieces were to be crimped together from the sides, with one crimp above the bow and one crimp below. Those crimps would be visible from the sides. (I don't have a vintage military trigger to examine, so I'm guessing.)

The trigger I have looks more like a hot, round, small diameter iron was applied to the rear face of the pad, one above and one below the pad. I can't tell if the depressions were created by pressure, or of they are TIG welds.
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Old May 24, 2020, 01:27 PM   #11
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Bill DeShivs
I would sure like to see pictures of a one-piece 1911 trigger assembly!
Making one would be an exercise in futility.
http://www.sightm1911.com/blueprint/m1911a1_blue.pdf

Scroll down. The last print in the set is the one-piece trigger drawing.
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Old Yesterday, 03:41 PM   #12
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Quote:
The late model trigger I have in front of me is clearly two pieces, but the profile of the pad doesn't match that shown on the Ordnance Department drawing. And the pad is aluminum, not steel as called for in the Ordnance drawing.
And just where did that "late model" trigger come from?? And, are you sure???

Aluminum says to me "NOT a GI trigger" And, if its not a GI trigger, why would you expect it to match GI Ordnance drawings?? '

Lots and lots of people have been making "1911" parts for some time now. IF it came with a label with a FSN (Fedral Stock Number) its probably a GI spec part.

If it didn't, it could be almost anything.
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Old Yesterday, 03:59 PM   #13
Bill DeShivs
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I was sent pictures of a fully machined 1911 trigger.
I can't imagine anyone making them that way, but they did!
Attached Images
File Type: jpg 1911 machined trigger.jpg (33.6 KB, 6 views)
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