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Old January 21, 2020, 03:28 AM   #1
trapper.44shooter
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I am Buying Me a Pietta 1858 Buffalo/Bison 12" .44 cal Revolver

Hello
I doing all of the research I can before I go to buy me one do any of you fellas shoot a Pietta Cap & Ball Revolver I am just starting in the cap & Ball guns & any information would be a big help I am nervous & excited at the same time I am going to cast my own round balls for my Pietta & I hope to get to start ordering what I need to get started I went all LEE I live on a fixed income where I am disabled & it takes me much longer to get to spend on bullet casting . Let me know & I would be grateful I just want info fellas
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Old January 21, 2020, 08:05 AM   #2
AKexpat
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You will be miles and money ahead if you can get a steel framed version. Brass frames are for light duty, even if it is a solid top Remmy.

Jim
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Old January 21, 2020, 01:31 PM   #3
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I understand the disability and not much money. Lee makes good molds for not much money. Get a double cavity mold at the least. I would not get a bottom pour lead pot. They're always getting clogged and dripping. Lead must be soft. Clip on wheel weights will not work. Balls made from range lead will not work. Roof flashing, dental lead, X-ray lead, stick on wheel weights are soft enough. Or you can buy it online.
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Old January 21, 2020, 04:00 PM   #4
MIOkie
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Welcome to the Forum, trapper.44shooter...!

It is a very exciting and enjoyable sport... and it can seem a little intimidating at first.

The Firing Line has a lot of good people willing to assist those with questions about all things Black Powder. Safety is a top priority and the loading of Black Powder needs to follow some basic guidelines.

Check out Gatofeo’s Sticky at the top of the thread list. Lot’s of good info there.

Welcome to the Dark Side of the shooting sports. :-)
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Old January 23, 2020, 11:03 AM   #5
rodwhaincamo
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Is it Midsouth Shooting Supplies that have the steel framed Buffalo at a good price? Avoid the brass frame version.
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Old January 24, 2020, 12:02 AM   #6
rodwhaincamo
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Old South something???
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Old January 24, 2020, 01:48 AM   #7
trapper.44shooter
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Old south firearms
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Old January 27, 2020, 12:52 PM   #8
Perldog007
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Old South was showing a blued steel 12" gun for 370 dollars. Kaido Ojaama makes a nice 220 gr mold for those late model Piettas or get the 240 for table stand loading or if you are okay with enlarging your loading port.
May take longer but anything you hit will be more disabled than you or I and in no further need of stipend as we are. My opinion only. I have Kaido's 140 gr VKV mold for my 1851 Navy ( Cheaper than a buffalo .44 1858 btw ). So now I'm saving for the 220. It will work in my 1860 and 1858 replicas.
I got all of those cheaper than a 12" brassy cost by shopping for sales. I still would have one if I had all the steel frames I want. I think they are pretty and I like to shoot light loads now and then.
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Old January 27, 2020, 01:01 PM   #9
Aguila Blanca
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Perldog007
Old South was showing a blued steel 12" gun for 370 dollars. Kaido Ojaama makes a nice 220 gr mold for those late model Piettas or get the 240 for table stand loading or if you are okay with enlarging your loading port.
May take longer but anything you hit will be more disabled than you or I and in no further need of stipend as we are. My opinion only. I have Kaido's 140 gr VKV mold for my 1851 Navy ( Cheaper than a buffalo .44 1858 btw ). So now I'm saving for the 220. It will work in my 1860 and 1858 replicas.
You are confusing the heck out of me, and I'm not even the guy who asked the question.

"Kaido Ojaama makes a nice 220 gr mold for those late model Piettas ..." Why is this mold specific to the late model Piettas? Is a .44 caliber ball for a Pietta Remington replica any different than a .44 caliber ball for a Colt Army replica?

Is your 1851 Navy a .36 caliber, or one of the .44 caliber "clones"? If it's in .36 and that's what the 140-grain mold refers to -- why even mention it when the question is about an 1858 Remington, which is a .44?

I'm sure you mean to be helpful, but sometimes too much unrelated information is counter-productive.
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Old January 27, 2020, 03:05 PM   #10
SIGSHR
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Yes, I would go for a steel frame. The brass frames were made by the CSA due to critical shortages of iron and steel. Like modern lightweight frames they do not hold up to prolonged use."
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Old January 27, 2020, 05:23 PM   #11
Hawg
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Quote:
The brass frames were made by the CSA due to critical shortages of iron and steel.
Confederate "brass" frames were not brass. They were a bronze alloy called gunmetal. All of them were .36 caliber. The majority were Colt style and the Spiller & Burr was a Whitney clone.
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Old January 27, 2020, 08:54 PM   #12
AKexpat
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Hawg View Post
Confederate "brass" frames were not brass. They were a bronze alloy called gunmetal. All of them were .36 caliber.
Spot on, Hawg.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Hawg View Post
The majority were Colt style.
The majority being the Griswold & Gunnison with over 3600 produced. G&G produced more .36 caliber gunmetal "copies" of the 1851 Navy than did Leech & Rigdon, Rigdon & Ansley, J.H. Dance & Brothers, L.E. Tucker, Augusta Machine Works, and Columbus Fire Arms Manufacturing Company in total, and all of those had iron frames.

Regards,

Jim
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Old January 29, 2020, 09:09 AM   #13
Perldog007
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Aguila Blanca View Post
You are confusing the heck out of me, and I'm not even the guy who asked the question.

"Kaido Ojaama makes a nice 220 gr mold for those late model Piettas ..." Why is this mold specific to the late model Piettas? Is a .44 caliber ball for a Pietta Remington replica any different than a .44 caliber ball for a Colt Army replica?

Is your 1851 Navy a .36 caliber, or one of the .44 caliber "clones"? If it's in .36 and that's what the 140-grain mold refers to -- why even mention it when the question is about an 1858 Remington, which is a .44?

I'm sure you mean to be helpful, but sometimes too much unrelated information is counter-productive.
Quote:
"Kaido Ojaama makes a nice 220 gr mold for those late model Piettas ..." Why is this mold specific to the late model Piettas? Is a .44 caliber ball for a Pietta Remington replica any different than a .44 caliber ball for a Colt Army replica?
This mold is specific to the late model Piettas as the 220 grain VKV , a modified Keith style Slug, fits in the loading lever cut out without modificaiton so you don't have to load on flat surface with a hammer?
The 240 grain mold ( preferred by most hog hunters ) makes a slug too big for the standard cut out on most newer belt pistol replicas. The 220 is easier use without modifying the weapon?
The point of that dissertation is that by saving up, AS I HAD TO DO ALSO BEING A DIASABLED VET ON A FIXED INCOME, was that the steel frame is much more versatile? If you are going to get a round ball mold and a 12 ich barrel we might be interested in ballistics? If we are saving up it sounds like a the OP is looking at a steel frame?
Also I said Piettas, not Remington Piettas. Works on my 1860 Pietta replica as well. So that sounds like you're just being obtuse trying to nit pick, which is fine. Arms are nit picky subjects.
I"m not confused by a statement like that but I've read at a graduate level since age 13.
Since other folks mentioned the brass frames I piled on. Sorry.
Quote:
Is your 1851 Navy a .36 caliber, or one of the .44 caliber "clones"? If it's in .36 and that's what the 140-grain mold refers to -- why even mention it when the question is about an 1858 Remington, which is a .44?
No, there is no 140 grain VKV/Keith style mold that I own in .44 caliber. As mentioned I do have the .36. Again, talking about MONEY AND FIXED INCOME.
The .36 steel frame with ball and conicals arguably handles more 'chores' than the Brass Buffallo 1858 and costs less initially? ALso it may prove more versatile than a steel buffalo with round ball only?
The point is that a steel frame in either .36 or .44 gives more options and on a fixed income for some of us it is worth the stretch to save up?
Didn't mean to confuse any experts. I'm fairly new to BP compared to shooting in general. Perhaps my buying motives are different than some others?
If we are saving up for a round ball mold maybe make a nice conical/keith style mold a goal too?
The O.P. and I both apparently are not persons of means.
I'm also trying to point out that there is nothing wrong with a brass frame if that's what a person favors, understanding the limitations.
I could totally see a round ball mold and a brass framed 12" bbl 1858 for paper punching and bunny busting. Nothing wrong with that life is there?
There is nothing wrong with shooting light loads. Some people hit more stuff like that?
I'm not an NRA instructor but rarely handed a g/f my model 29 stuffed with 240 grain Normas saying "Let her rip darling!" unless it was a lady who was into that kind of thing
Sorry if my verbose style is offputting. Used to be Aaron Zelman's webmaster at JPFO. Had to read lots of verbose stuff in that job.

Last edited by Perldog007; January 29, 2020 at 09:33 AM.
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