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Old June 20, 2021, 10:33 AM   #26
RickB
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Mueschke. They show up on ebay, occasionally.
Crappy pic, but this is a Wilson drop-in on a Colt Delta Elite.
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Old June 20, 2021, 10:26 PM   #27
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Mueschke. They show up on ebay, occasionally.
Crappy pic, but this is a Wilson drop-in on a Colt Delta Elite.
What's the frame to safety fit look like when it's pressed inward?
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Old June 21, 2021, 03:48 PM   #28
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Safety is pinned in the depressed position.
Stock, the safety fits smoothly in the static, engaged position, but since I was going to pin it in the depressed position, I did a little grinding and polishing so it was better blended in the depressed /disengaged position, the way you would with a gunsmith-fit beavertail (other than all the work is done to the safety, and the frame is left alone).
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Old June 21, 2021, 08:44 PM   #29
101combatvet
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Safety is pinned in the depressed position.
Stock, the safety fits smoothly in the static, engaged position, but since I was going to pin it in the depressed position, I did a little grinding and polishing so it was better blended in the depressed /disengaged position, the way you would with a gunsmith-fit beavertail (other than all the work is done to the safety, and the frame is left alone).
That's the problem with drop-in Beavertail safeties; they still should be fitted to the frame.
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Old June 22, 2021, 05:31 AM   #30
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Just to interject a little information:
* Norinco firearms have not been imported to the USA since the 1990s. Norinco was banned from importing firearms by the US government. Canadians can still get them, but no US imports.
* Norinco used fair quality metal in their 1911s. Not great, just fair.
* Nobody I know uses Norinco 1911s for custom builds just because they are scarce. I've been a smith for 30 years and I have only seen about a dozen of them. More people using Rock Island frames and slides now, or just building up US commercial 1911s.
* Most custom 1911 builders I know use custom frames. If you are goiing to ask a customer to lay out $3000 for a custom 1911, it had better not say Springfield or Taurus on it.
Colt steel is 4140. Norinco steel is 5100 so I'd say it's a little better than fair.
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Old June 23, 2021, 01:56 AM   #31
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Better in what way? More machinable? Higher tensile strength? AISI manual describes 5100 as being a chrome-manganese steel with excellent abrasion resistance. But the SAE manual says it is used for stamped tools like shovels and for bearings, so go figure. 4140 is described as a pre-hardened chrome-molybdenum steel best suited for forgings and stressed uses. Neither of those tell me much in the way of "how good the steel is". What I can tell you about the Norinco pistols is that they have a lot of porosity and they are not made to the 1911 spec (grip screw bushing threads are not threaded to the proper thread, the trigger tunnel is too narrow, the trigger bar tunnel is too shallow), and that when you machine them you find hard and soft spots. In these days of investment cast parts a little porosity doesn't sound too bad, but Colts were always famous for excellent finishes. Either way, the Norinco pistols are fair. And the roll mark on the side of the slide "Model of the 1911" always cracked me up
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