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Old October 7, 2017, 05:12 PM   #1
Brassguy
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Dillion Hints

Just acquired a Dillion Square Deal B reloader for penny's on the dollar from a shop going out of business. Anyone have any tips or tricks they would suggest?
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Old October 7, 2017, 06:00 PM   #2
DaleA
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Sounds like a good deal. What cartridges do you plan on reloading? Also you'll get better answers if you list your reloading experience.
Good luck and welcome to the forum.
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Old October 7, 2017, 07:32 PM   #3
DukeConnor
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My advice is to put it in a box and send it back to dillon to have it refurbished. Put all the dies and accesories in the box. It will come back updated, worn parts replaced, and like new. May cost you 50 bucks for shipping.

It will save you alot of aggrevation and heartache.
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Old October 7, 2017, 08:27 PM   #4
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Dale,
Been loading rifle, handgun, and shotgun for about 15 years now. I have multiple types of progressive loaders for shotgun, and been using a RCBS for rifle and pistol. Still plan on my rockchucker for precision rifle. It's my first progressive handgun press so that's why I wanted to know if others had tips or tricks.

It came set up for .40 S&W which I do shoot. Plan on getting the conversion kits at a later date for .45 ACP/.38/.357/.44 Mag
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Old October 7, 2017, 08:28 PM   #5
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Duke,
Thanks for the advice, won't have to send it back because it is brand new in box.
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Old October 7, 2017, 09:00 PM   #6
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Download the manual and read it once before you touch it. That way you will know where to look before you ask 99.9% of the questions people ask on Internet forums.
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Old October 7, 2017, 09:03 PM   #7
condor bravo
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I don't have one, but the Square Deal has automatic advance (indexing) and to begin with at least, you might want to shut it off if it can be done, and operate with manual advance. Using a RL550 instead that doesn't have automatic advance, I run into various situations where I don't even want automatic advance due to the need to back up immediately or not advance to the next station. I'm not aware how your other progressive would handle that.
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Old October 8, 2017, 03:02 AM   #8
DukeConnor
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Brassguy View Post
Duke,
Thanks for the advice, won't have to send it back because it is brand new in box.
I bought a used one and had primer feed issues until i sent it back. If it is new you should be good to go. There are some you tube videos on how to do do caliber conversions. Be careful of the detent ball. Its easy to lose.
Get some extra primer tubes and the spare parts kit. The spare parts kit has all the springs and things you will need to keep it running.

Like with any progressive, a solid mount is key. If your bench isn't solid it will cause you problems. Have fun. I love my SDB.
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Old October 8, 2017, 07:59 AM   #9
jmorris
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I wouldn't go tearing into your new press, you would be asking for problems.

Here is the manual.
http://dillonhelp.com/Dillon%20Manua...December09.pdf

They tell you how to set it up step by step. If you want only run a single case through all operations, sure it won't be very progressive at that point but you can have undivided attention on the single round through all operations.

Once you have a full grasp on everything that is happening, then you can add a case with every stroke.

Biggest hint is if something doesn't feel right, STOP! It doesn't matter what press you are loading on to use that tidbit.
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Old October 8, 2017, 10:04 AM   #10
Brassguy
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Everyone, thanks for the tips
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Old October 8, 2017, 10:29 AM   #11
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CB, the indexing cannot be defeated on this press, but since the OP has 15 years on other equipment, I don't think that will cause him a learning problem.


Brassguy,

Congratulations on your find.

You want a solid mount for this press. I make my benches about 41" high for my comfort, but many are 34 or 36 inches, and I would recommend some sort of tall mount for such a bench so your aren't at all bent over when you stand for loading. A bar stool is a good way to sit at a press on a tall bench or on tall mounts. Both Dillon and Inline Fabrication make tall mounts for this press. Dillon's are called Strong Mounts, and Inline's are called Ultramounts, which cost more than the Dillons, but add some tray storage.

The bench and mount need to be solid. You will find you get in the habit of giving the press handle a shove to seat primers solidly. The press likes easy-to-seat primers. Before their process change in 1992, CCI were too hard to seat consistently in mine, often coming out high, but are OK in it now. Today it is mainly the primers made overseas (Tula, Wolf, and I've heard, but not tried myself, S&B) still have cup burrs and are tough to seat and will give you high primers in that press. This can be problematic as a primer that is too high at the seating station can jam the indexing.

Rig a light or buy one of the light kits sold by Inline Fabrication so you can easily check powder level in the case as you set the bullet in place for seating. It is pretty rare that there is a problem. The biggest risk is pulling a case for some problem then putting it into station 2 for recharging after forgetting to dump the original charge. Highly improbable, but it can happen, so, better safe than sorry.

The newer primer tube primer feed column follower rods have more weight at the top than the originals (which I have) did. A lot of us over the years have placed an inverted case over top of it to add weight to help ensure a primer is picked up by the carrier each time. Things get vibrated around on these presses (a lot goes on with each stroke) and an occasional primer tipped slightly sideways by that will fail to drop into the feed lips. The added weight seems to solve that.

Periodically remove and push an alcohol dampened Q-tip through the primer feed tube and your primer pickup tubes to clean any primer dust out. These days I use Federal primers pretty exclusively in mine, and they have a lacquer sealant that seems to be effective at stopping dust release. But do the cleaning anyway. Primer tube explosions are rare, but when they do happen, they are usually credited to priming mix dust having built up. You can find discussion on this by searching this forum for old threads on the matter. Again, it is rare, but something to be avoided, since you can do so by cleaning.
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Old October 8, 2017, 03:28 PM   #12
jmorris
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Quote:
CB, the indexing cannot be defeated on this press,
There are several ways to do it, the easiest would be to remove the indexing bolt on the back of the press but I wouldn't or suggest anyone else to load with one like that.
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Old October 9, 2017, 10:34 AM   #13
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Yes. I was going short of defeating the mechanism. Plus, unlike the 550B, there is no thumb spur plate on the SDB to index with. Operation will be clumsy. My point was that manual indexing isn't an intended or featured option of the design.
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Old October 9, 2017, 01:08 PM   #14
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Dowload the manual from Dillon...if it is not in the box.../ read it thru a couple of times....then just set it up ( follow every step carefully )...and enjoy it !

SDB is a good press...it uses proprietary dies vs standard dies...is about the only thing that is different.
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