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Old October 16, 2017, 09:50 AM   #1
Arbl58
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More newby questions

I have many different case brands for my 38. Do you separate case brands when reloading ( winchester, federal, etc.)? Some are brass colored and silver colored, I am thinking as long as they are sized correctly it shouldn't matter.

I have used x-treme copper coated bullets and they seem to do well in my 686.I am about to embark into loading for my .45 M&P, has anyone used the x-treme copper plated bullets in your auto and have you had any problems?

A friend of mine that passed and I used to reload years ago(10 plus). I have powder left over from then,it has been sealed and doesn't appear to have gotten damp/wet. Is it still safe and if not how do I get rid of it?

Sorry one more where do you buy your supplies from(on-line or locally or both)?

Thanks so much--Rich
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Old October 16, 2017, 10:07 AM   #2
FITASC
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Separate cases? I don't - But I look for ones that have split
I have used their lead bullets with success
Powder should be good; you can tell by the color and smell if bad
I get my supplies online; things with hazmat fees like primers and powders, I go through my local shotgun club as that stuff gets put on the truckload of targets they buy so none of those fees apply.
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Old October 16, 2017, 10:10 AM   #3
buck460XVR
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I generally sort cases by brand or case lenght, but it is not really necessary for .38. A little variance in case length will mean a small variance in flare and crimp, which for the most part, especially with .38 special has very little influence. Once you get to .357 and are using very slow burning powders seeking the best accuracy, this might change.

I use X-Treme 230 gr HPs in my Colt 1911 Government and they work very well. They are only a practice/range type bullet and while they can be accurate, they do not perform well terminally for SD/HD.

Powder that is 10 years old, sealed and stored properly should be fine, but you should know how to tell if it has deteriorated. Something easily Googled. Best way to get rid of deteriorated or any other powder you do not want/use is to use it as fertilizer.

As I said in your other post, read your manual(If you don't have one, get at least one). It will give you the answers to most of the questions you have already posted in very simple and easy to understand terms.

I get supplies both locally and online, depending on price and availability. I suggest that as a new reloader, you do not invest in large amounts of anything until you find what works well for you, in your firearms. A good price on a thousand bullets or 8#s of powder is not a value if they do not work well for you and end up sitting on the shelf.
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Old October 16, 2017, 10:16 AM   #4
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Here's a list of reloading links taken from another forum:

Note that some may be more shotgun-oriented, however.

Quote:
Reloading supplies
http://www.gunbroker.com/Reloading-Supplies/BI.aspx
http://www.precisionreloading.com/
http://www.ballisticproducts.com/
http://www.grafs.com/
http://reloaders.com/
http://www.alliantpowder.com/
http://www.alliantpowder.com/reloaders/default.aspx
http://www.hodgdonreloading.com/
http://www.hodgdon.com/
http://www.bucksrunsports.com/
http://www.reloadingspecialtiesinc.com/ ... wshot.html
http://www.accurateshooter.com/gear-rev ... lletguide/
http://castpics.net/dpl/
http://castpics.net/dpl/index.php/reloa ... ata-lookup
http://www.castpics.net/LoadData/Freebies/default.html
http://www.castpics.net/LoadData/Freebi ... liant.html
http://www.wwpowder.com/
http://www.rotometals.com/Lead-Shot-s/64.htm
http://www.norma.cc/en/Ammunition-Academy/Loading-Data/
http://www.claybusterwads.com/
http://www.claybusterwads.com/index.php ... -cb1075-20
http://www.gunbot.net/ammo/shotgun/28ga/
http://www.gunbot.net/reloading/Powder/
http://ammoseek.com/reloading/powder
http://www.extremereloadingnv.com/reloa ... nstock/yes
http://www.gamaliel.com/
http://www.gamaliel.com/prodcat/powder.asp
http://reloadingunlimited.com/product-c ... s-alliant/
https://www.recobstargetshop.com/
http://www.natchezss.com/
http://www.powdervalleyinc.com/
http://www.selwayarmory.com/
https://www.midsouthshooterssupply.com/ ... rentPage=1
http://store.thirdgenerationshootingsupply.com/
http://www.midwayusa.com/cart
http://www.billydsupplies.com/index.php?cPath=25_24_31
http://www.oncefiredhulls.com/asp-bin/Detail.asp?ID=120
http://www.bloomertool.com/Metric-Arch- ... nches.html
http://www.chestnutridge.com/products/ammo.asp
http://www.morganoptical.net/
http://shotgunworld.com/bbs/viewtopic.php?f=73&t=417259
http://mcneeleyenterprises.com/Lead_Recovery.html
http://www.downrangemfg.com/
http://www.downrangemfg.com/index.php?o ... &Itemid=62
http://windjammer-wads.com/Search.php?G ... SKOR+800-X
http://www.toolplanet.com/product/Stark ... aQodOGQA3w
http://www.tbirdammo.com/
http://phoenix.backpage.com/SportsEquip ... =reloading
http://phoenix.backpage.com/SportsEquip ... g/31357376
http://www.bullets.com/products/Steel-S ... 1lb/BL3980
http://www.butchsreloading.com/shop/10_ ... owder?n=50
http://powderhornvt.com/
http://macsreloading.com/
http://www.brownells.com/manufacturers/ ... 1=In+Stock
http://christensenreloading.com/index.p ... s/powders/
http://www.cacassociatesinc.com/page110.html
http://www.baschieri-pellagri.com/en/bo ... index.aspx
http://hi-techammo.com/products/fiocchi ... tgun-hulls
https://www.rotometals.com/checkout/order-confirmation
http://www.ballisticproducts.com/loadof ... rchive.htm
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Old October 16, 2017, 10:54 AM   #5
mikld
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As to your brass; sorting by headstamp for revolver ammo isn't necessary. But, there's no harm in it, if you wanna, go ahead (for some load work-ups I sort by headstamp, usually heavy magnum loads). The silver looking cases are nickel plated, used originally for belt loop carry as the leather does not corrode the nickel (brass will turn green after a while when carried in a gun belt). Personally I have found no difference using nickel plated brass vs. plain brass cases but some do find the nickel plated brass to have a slightly shorter case life (I read of a real life test where a reloader got average of 16 reloadings with nickel cases before neck splits and over 20 reloadings with plain brass cases. Same load, same method). But 38 Special brass is easy to find and inexpensive so case life isn't a deal breaker. Inspection is an essential part of reloading so finding case defects is a priority, and easily done as a first step in the process.

Normally I don't recommend plated bullets to new reloaders because there is not much easy to find info regarding loads, load levels, crimping, etc. For a new reloader I like to recommend starting with a tried and true load with jacketed bullets and when the reloader gets familiar with the process, then he can branch out to different components. (for your 45 ACP reloading I'd suggest some 230 gr. FMJ. They have been successfully loaded for 100+ years and every problem has been experienced and worked out).

I like to buy locally as much as possible (I'll drive 100 miles to purchase powder rather than buy online). I was trained in Hazmat handling, and truly believe gun powder is no more dangerous than aerosol cans which don't have to cost extra to be shipped. An anti-gun dig snuck through?
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Old October 16, 2017, 11:23 AM   #6
buck460XVR
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Quote:
Originally Posted by mikld View Post
I was trained in Hazmat handling, and truly believe gun powder is no more dangerous than aerosol cans which don't have to cost extra to be shipped. An anti-gun dig snuck through?
The DOT does not require HazMat fees. The vendors charge this fee because the packaging and transportation requirements set forth by DOT require extra time for employees to process.

So FedEx and UPS are the guys charging HazMat fees not DOT. They charge these fees to cover extra time and handling by the staff, extra labels and all other added shipping costs. Preparing a HazMat shipment requires a trained individual. Initial training and followup training every three years or so is required.
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Old October 16, 2017, 11:57 AM   #7
T. O'Heir
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"...brass colored and silver colored..." The latter are nickel plated. Treated exactly the same as non--plated. You'll probably find the case mouths crack a bit faster with 'em though. The brand makes no difference whatsoever.
As mentioned, buying components on-line can get expensive quickly due to shipping fees(that are set by the carrier not the seller) and hazmat fees. Much better to buy components locally.
Go buy a copy of The ABC's of Reloading. Answers to a lot of question are in it. Runs about $30 in your local gun shop or Amazon.
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Old October 16, 2017, 12:00 PM   #8
FITASC
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Quote:
So FedEx and UPS are the guys charging HazMat fees not DOT.
Almost. Those companies DO pay DOT fees, typically one nice big check every year for their license/permit to haul that stuff. Don't forget, their drivers have to be trained in handing the stuff too - and both have a LOT of drivers.
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Old October 16, 2017, 02:38 PM   #9
Nick_C_S
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Welcome to TFL.

I load a lot of 38 Special; and have for over three decades.

Quote:
I have many different case brands for my 38. Do you separate case brands when reloading
Well, I do. But only because I have so darn much of it. I possess - easily - 5000 pieces of 38 Special brass. Most likely, more like 6000+ pieces. Most of what I have is Winchester (from factory "White Box" ammo I personally shot), Starline (which I bought new), and GECO (which I have the most of - once fired by a friend who shoots a ton, but doesn't load). Then I have a whole bunch of "mixed" ( R-P, federal, etc.). Right now, I only load the GECO and the rest just sits. But that's my thing, and doesn't really answer what you want to know - sorry. If I had only a few hundred pieces of 38 Special brass and it was mixed headstamp, I would just load them sans headstamp discrimination. 38 Special, when loaded per reliable data and with quality components, won't care what headstamp brass is holding the components together and in alignment (the real job of the brass).

Quote:
Some are brass colored and silver colored, I am thinking as long as they are sized correctly it shouldn't matter.
Correct. It's not really going to matter. The "brass colored" is just bare brass; and the "silver colored" ones are nickel plated, btw. It's actually fodder for a lot of discussion, but regarding your post, there's no real difference between brass or nickel cases.

Quote:
I have used x-treme copper coated bullets and they seem to do well in my 686.
X-treme makes a good product(s). I use a lot of X-treme bullets. And they are particularly well suited for 38 Special because as long as you stick with reliable published data, a plated bullet should hold up just fine; without need to step up to jacketed.

Quote:
I am about to embark into loading for my .45 M&P, has anyone used the x-treme copper plated bullets in your auto and have you had any problems?
Same as above. And for the same reason. 45 ACP is also a low pressure round. And plated bullets fair equally well. I only use jacketed bullets for 45 ACP for my very hottest (self-defense level) ammo.

Quote:
I have powder left over from (10 years ago), it has been sealed and doesn't appear to have gotten damp/wet. Is it still safe and if not how do I get rid of it?
Smell it. If it's still "fragrant" (for lack of a better description) and not acrid smelling, it should be fine. Five years ago, I discovered powder I left at my father's house from 1987 (that's 25 years) and it shot just fine. Granted, it was stored in near ideal conditions. Point is, I doubt you'll need to get rid of it. If you did, by odd chance, the common school of thought is to use it for fertilizer. I suppose that's an okay thing to do, but I wouldn't fertilize anything that bears fruit you intend to eat. Smokeless propellant likely has stuff you don't want to enter the human food chain.

Quote:
where do you buy your supplies from (on-line or locally or both)?
Both. Usually locally. But with big purchases, I go on line. On line usually means a hazmat fee of $20 or so. But that fee doesn't increase with the size of your order; thus, it's not big of a deal if your purchasing 8 pounds or more.

Enjoy your return to loading. Be safe.
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Old October 16, 2017, 03:13 PM   #10
hdwhit
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Quote:
Arbl58 wrote:
I have powder left over from then,it has been sealed and doesn't appear to have gotten damp/wet. Is it still safe and if not how do I get rid of it?
Probably.

Step one to check powder is to vigorously shake the container to be sure that the powder is well mixed.

Step two is to open the container and smell it. Good powder should smell like alcohol, ether or acetone. Bad powder will smell acidic because it is decaying into nitric acid.

Step three is to spread a small amount in a thin layer on a piece of white paper. Look at the color of the powder. Good powder will be black, gray or silver. There may be colorful flakes (i.e. blue, red, green, etc) in it, too. Ignore them. Bad powder is brown or rust colored. If the powder is good, use the paper to form a funnel to transfer the powder back to the container.

Always deal with only one canister of power at a time to prevent accidental contamination.

The Fire Code says to dispose of powder by dumping it in small piles no more than about one pound each, leaving a powder train back a safe distance from the pile (just like in the cartoons) and then use the powder train to light the pile.

You can spread it in thin layers on grass or ornamental plants. As it decays, it provides nitrogen to the soil. Keep the layers thin because smokeless propellants produce nitric acid as part of the decay process and large amounts can burn plant leaves and roots. I think Nick C S was very wise to warn that the additives to slow decay of the powder are as best kept kept away from plants and grasses that will be fed to humans or livestock.
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Old October 16, 2017, 11:19 PM   #11
briandg
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You have nothing to worry about. Pay attention as you load.
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