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Old August 16, 2020, 11:56 AM   #1
GaryED50
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Springfield 1842 Musket at LGS

Awesome find at my LGS. an 1842 Springfield rifled Musket. In very good condition. It was so incredible to pick up and hold this Rifle, if it could only talk and tell about its adventures and service. asking price was $1099.00
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Old August 16, 2020, 12:30 PM   #2
Jim Watson
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An original? Rifled?
I know they went back and rifled a bunch of muskets. A .69 Minie ball is a LARGE projectile.
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Old August 16, 2020, 05:09 PM   #3
GaryED50
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An original? Rifled?
I know they went back and rifled a bunch of muskets. A .69 Minie ball is a LARGE projectile.
Surprised me too but I took a look with a bore light and its definitely rifled. it was really something to see and examine.
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Old August 17, 2020, 12:36 PM   #4
44caliberkid
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If this is an original arm in VG condition, the price is excellent, should be $2000 - $3000. If it is a reproduction then it is just discounted a couple hundred.
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Old August 18, 2020, 12:40 AM   #5
std7mag
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I'm leaning towards reproduction.
Rifling really wasn't in production till closer to the end of the war.
Civil war that is, so your talking 1863-64.
I was wondering if it shouldn't have been a flintlock, but upon further research the 42' was indeed percussion. The 40's were changed over from flintlock to percussion to make them 42's.
And they were indeed smoothbores.
Even my original 1861 Harpers Ferry is a smoothbore.

Still, nice find & beauty of a musket!
And one you can shoot!
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Old August 18, 2020, 07:55 AM   #6
Hawg
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Quote:
Originally Posted by std7mag View Post
I'm leaning towards reproduction.
Rifling really wasn't in production till closer to the end of the war.
Civil war that is, so your talking 1863-64.
I was wondering if it shouldn't have been a flintlock, but upon further research the 42' was indeed percussion. The 40's were changed over from flintlock to percussion to make them 42's.
And they were indeed smoothbores.
Even my original 1861 Harpers Ferry is a smoothbore.

Still, nice find & beauty of a musket!
And one you can shoot!
There were 14,000 of them rifled between 1856-1859.
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Old August 18, 2020, 03:44 PM   #7
GaryED50
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Quote:
Originally Posted by std7mag View Post
I'm leaning towards reproduction.
Rifling really wasn't in production till closer to the end of the war.
Civil war that is, so your talking 1863-64.
I was wondering if it shouldn't have been a flintlock, but upon further research the 42' was indeed percussion. The 40's were changed over from flintlock to percussion to make them 42's.
And they were indeed smoothbores.
Even my original 1861 Harpers Ferry is a smoothbore.

Still, nice find & beauty of a musket!
And one you can shoot!
Its not a repro my friend

Its one of two authentic muzzle loaders he has in the shop. the other is an Springfield Model 1861. hate to imagine the price on that one
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Old August 18, 2020, 04:29 PM   #8
Jim Watson
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Ought not to be too bad, there were far more 1861s than reworked 1842s.
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Old August 19, 2020, 04:58 PM   #9
Hawg
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Originally Posted by GaryED50 View Post
Its not a repro my friend

Its one of two authentic muzzle loaders he has in the shop. the other is an Springfield Model 1861. hate to imagine the price on that one
You should be able to find a decent 1861 shooter for around 1000.00
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Old August 20, 2020, 03:51 PM   #10
GaryED50
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You should be able to find a decent 1861 shooter for around 1000.00
Only 1000.00

I thought it would be much higher

Gary
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Old August 20, 2020, 07:21 PM   #11
Hawg
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Only 1000.00

I thought it would be much higher

Gary
Decent shooter, not a museum piece. You can find them with cut down stocks for a lot less.
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Old September 15, 2020, 01:57 PM   #12
GaryED50
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I must apologize and beg a thousand pardons... I had an occasion to drop back by the LGS and examined the musket again and it is a smoothbore

sorry guys

Gary
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Old September 24, 2020, 02:02 PM   #13
4V50 Gary
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I've given to believe that some 1842s were rifled subsequent to being made.

That's the difference between a rifled musket (smoothbore musket that has been subsequently rifled) and a rifle musket (long arm originally made with a rifled bore).
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Old September 24, 2020, 07:04 PM   #14
Hawg
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Originally Posted by 4V50 Gary View Post
I've given to believe that some 1842s were rifled subsequent to being made.

That's the difference between a rifled musket (smoothbore musket that has been subsequently rifled) and a rifle musket (long arm originally made with a rifled bore).
You are correct.
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Old September 25, 2020, 05:40 AM   #15
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The research I did on mine indicated that the 1842 barrels were made 'thicker' in anticipation of future rifling. And as indicated above, quite a few were manufactured with rifling. I understand that the rifled version came with a rear sight.

My wife bought me mine at a local auction for fathers day. That was exiting. Mine isn't rifled either and I have a hard time keeping it on a man sized target at 25 yards. But I bet I could hit a regiment sized target at 100 yards.

My 1861 is much more accurate, though I have only shot it with 58 caliber round ball. Still trying to figure a way to measure its actual bore diameter.

I thought that all 1861's were rifled?
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Old September 25, 2020, 06:12 AM   #16
Mike Irwin
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"I thought that all 1861's were rifled? "

Yes.

The Model 1842 was the last musket adopted into US service, and it was also the last .69 caliber adopted. Tests at Springfield armory with rifled M1842s vs. what would later become the .58 caliber M1855 showed that the .58 cal. Minie ball was more accurate and had better ballistics and range.
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Old September 25, 2020, 01:08 PM   #17
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At $1,099, it's a probably Traditions repro. That's not a bad thing, but $1,099 is a bit less than their MSRP of $1209.
Supposedly rifled after 1855 when the .58 calibre was adopted.
https://americanhistory.si.edu/colle...t/nmah_1202360
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