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Old March 12, 2016, 02:29 PM   #1
BumbleBug
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Any Recommended Books on Concealed Carry

I've gotten some excellent info from TFL, watched many YouTubes, gone to many holster websites, read about calibers, which guns & sizes, tactics, etc....

I realize carrying a concealed handgun eventually boils down to the personal choice you're comfortable with. (I've noticed that many people with CHL's have a few holsters for sale & perhaps a pistol or two!)

Is there a book that can help get someone on the right track? I mean discuss holsters, type of carry, cant, concealment issues, various handguns, calibers, gun sizes, what all the abbreviations mean, etc..? People just seem to do a lot of trial-n-error to become serious every-day CC'ers. Is there a book considered to be the bible of CC?

TIA...
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Old March 12, 2016, 10:20 PM   #2
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I don't know of a resource like that. What I know about holsters and concealment I've gathered from reading magazine articles, experimenting, from a sentence or two here or there in many books, from interviews and from comments and articles/videos on the internet.

If you have specific questions, this is a good place to post them.

Some general information I've picked up that has stood me in good stead.

Always buy a holster made specifically for the gun you intend to carry. Holsters designed to fit multiple guns generally don't fit any gun well.

Always buy a holster made with loops/slots to fit the size belt you intend to wear. For comfort and proper operation, you don't want things shifting around once you get it placed where you want.

Start with a good belt. It doesn't have to be a monster that screams: "tactical", or "gun belt" but it does need to be sturdy and well-made.

To allow normal motion (bending/sitting/reaching) while still concealing, a cover garment needs to extend about 6" below the lowest part of the gun/holster combination that will be visible. OWB (outside the waistband) designs require a cover garment that extends half a foot below the bottom of the holster. IWB lets the cover garment be much shorter since you only need to conceal about 6" below the belt.

OWB is more comfortable than IWB but makes concealment more of a challenge.
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Old March 13, 2016, 12:38 AM   #3
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One book to cover it all.....no, not really -- but Massad Ayoob's books "Combat Handgunnery" and "Concealed Carry" - both gun digest books - cover a lot of it.

I echo the idea of a solid belt and a one gun specific holster ( western shops, horse tac stores, leather good craftsmen, etc ) usually have some good thick leather belts that won't twist like dept store belts.

Holster I trust - that a number of well known instructors recommend is Kramer leather / and I like horsehide with FBI forward cant....but there are other good options out there too....

As your experience grows - your equipment may or may not change -- but read a lot, talk to a lot of guys at range, ask what they bought & why & would they buy it again....you will probably find some common threads. Have fun with the process - and realize what works for me, may not work for you. I have my bias ...and so do most guys / just know that going in. I will go thru moods where I change my carry gun - partly because I have a lot of guns and I want to ( 1911's, Sig 239, S&W K frame .357 ---- that's not really recommended unless you train a lot with all of them & I do -- but 90% or more of the time I go back to a full sized 1911 in 9mm these days.....)..../ prior to about a yr ago, for the last 20 yrs it was a full sized 1911 in .45acp...so let it evolve, if you can.

Last edited by BigJimP; March 13, 2016 at 12:43 AM.
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Old March 13, 2016, 08:32 AM   #4
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Quote:
Originally Posted by BigJimP
One book to cover it all.....no, not really -- but Massad Ayoob's books "Combat Handgunnery" and "Concealed Carry" - both gun digest books - cover a lot of it.....

Holster I trust - that a number of well known instructors recommend is Kramer leather / and I like horsehide with FBI forward cant....but there are other good options out there too....
Thanks to you & JohnKSa for the good replies & suggestions. I'll definitely look into Ayoob's book. A good example of some of my confusion is "FBI forward cant" which I don't know what that means. I finally figured out what "appendix carry" was! To top things off, this stuff is then usually abbreviated! Good advice on the belt, I hadn't thought much about that.

I've had a CHL for 8 years now but I want to get more serious about every day carry. On occasions that I do carry, I have a small pocket .380 or snub nose .38 Spcl. No holsters, just in the pocket of pants or jacket. I have a full sized Colt 1911 .45, but I never considered it a CC gun!

I'm just trying to cut through some of the confusion. Thanks again for the replies.
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Old March 13, 2016, 11:59 AM   #5
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That was why I said what works for me - may not work for you...but I consider a full sized 1911 a perfect conceal carry gun.

Thinner than most double stack guns, weight is no big deal with a good belt and a good holster, 9mm is plenty of fire power ( in my view ) especially with all the improved defensive ammo these days --- 1911's have great triggers, I train with it all the time, I shoot it great...

Besides the 5" all steel Wilson Combat Protector model in 9mm that's become my primary carry gun ...I have a 4" alloy frame Kimber Tac Pro model that would be lighter in 9mm...but to me its no big deal. I live in a temperate climate so its easy to dress to conceal an Inside Waist Band holster...and a mag pouch on my left..

http://thefiringline.com/forums/atta...0&d=1357338028

A pair of Wilson's at bottom - CQB .45 acp, Wilson 9mm Protector, Kimber Gold Combat Stainless .45acp, Kimber 4" 9mm at top right, Baer 5" monolith 9mm at upper left... / and I now carry the all stainless Wilson 9mm... / as I've moved into my late 60's and some arthritis issues, the CQB in .45 acp is more than I think I need these days --- my split times with the 9mm are faster...( feel, weight, etc of both guns are virtually identical )... 9mm holds 10 + 1 rds which is plenty ( 8 + 1 was plenty in .45 acp too in my view ).

I've had some elbow and shoulder and upper arm surgeries ( all on my shooting arm and hand side unfortunately )...and I find the forward cant of the FBI style ...to be a little easier on my elbows and my shortened bicep when I draw and train every week. Some of my buddies don't like it ...some of them like other brands of holsters..

As an example - I have a group of guys from early 40's to early 70's - and we shoot "tactically" once a week for friendly competition and bragging rights - and most of us practice one or two other days every week ( 6 - 8 boxes a week )...--- and we have all carried and been shooting for over 20 yrs....but my point is one carries a 4" Springfield 1911 .45 acp -- and he's thinking about going to a 1911 in 9mm ( becuase I whip his butt every week on the range mostly) , one carries a Glock 17 ?, one carries a Sig 229 in .40, one often carries a K frame S&W revolver in .38 spl, one carries a Kimber 4" with a bobtail frame... I had a BobTail frame on an Ed Brown that I never liked.../ and we debate this stuff all the time...( and I know I'm right for what suits me the best )...but they're each right, more or less, for what suits them..

It evolves...

Last edited by BigJimP; March 13, 2016 at 12:16 PM.
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Old March 13, 2016, 12:24 PM   #6
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what I know about carrying a weapon, the practice, selection of leather, load and so forth, is the result of a life long journey down that road.
I don't think a single book could ever replace the daily, year to year just plain DOING it way to accumulate knowledge.
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Old March 13, 2016, 01:16 PM   #7
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Quote:
Originally Posted by BumbleBug
Is there a book that can help get someone on the right track?... People just seem to do a lot of trial-n-error to become serious every-day CC'ers.
I have read some Ayoob and can recommend that as well. I don't recall the exact title though.

Trial-n-error just comes with the territory IMO. You can research as much as you want to help reduce the "error" part but until you "trial" it yourself, you won't know for sure. Just accept this and start somewhere. You'll figure out what works for you and what doesn't. Keep what works and get rid of what doesn't.
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Old March 13, 2016, 01:40 PM   #8
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Quote:
A good example of some of my confusion is "FBI forward cant" which I don't know what that means.
Canting the gun forward just means that the designer set up the holster so it tilts forward by proper placement of the holster loops or slots.

The main benefit is that by canting the gun forward, the grip now angles upward somewhat rather than protruding almost straight backwards. That makes it easier to conceal.

It can also make it a little easier to get a grip on a gun, especially if the holster rides high on the belt--which is common with concealment holsters since it minimizes the required length of the cover garment.

The FBI cant is a common forward cant that the FBI pioneered, or at least standardized. I actually don't know what the specific cant angle is, but it's one that seems to work well for most folks.
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Old March 13, 2016, 02:27 PM   #9
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Kramer forward FBI tilt holster is between 10 and 15 degrees forward of vertical....in some models they will offer a 10 degree, a 12.5 degree and a 15 degree... / I like the 15 degree.
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Old March 13, 2016, 05:50 PM   #10
Smoke Jensen
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A good first book for anybody who carries is "In the Gravest Exream" by Massad Ayoob.
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Old March 13, 2016, 09:52 PM   #11
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PLEASE do not carry without a holster! (For your safety and others.)

With nothing to protect the trigger, foreign objects can get lodged in the trigger guard and cause a negligent discharge. There are pocket holsters and miniature trigger-guard only holsters, if you want to carry in a pocket. They will keep objects in your pocket or hitting your pocket from the outside from pulling the trigger.
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Old March 13, 2016, 10:01 PM   #12
Slimjim9
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Quote:
Originally Posted by BumbleBug
I've had a CHL for 8 years now but I want to get more serious about every day carry. On occasions that I do carry, I have a small pocket .380 or snub nose .38 Spcl. No holsters, just in the pocket of pants or jacket.
I'm with raimius. I pocket carry an LCR357. It would probably be safe to carry in a pocket by itself, but I still use a Desantis Nemesis pocket holster. It keeps it in the same location, keeps the trigger covered, and eliminates printing of the cylinder. I wouldn't even consider a semi without a holster.
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Old March 14, 2016, 05:21 AM   #13
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Reference books for CCW

Here are some good ones:

THE STREET-SMART GUN BOOK by John. S. Farnam

THE FARNAM METHOD OF DEFENSIVE HANDGUNNING (2nd edition)
by John. S. Farnam

----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
IN THE GRAVEST EXTREME: THE ROLE OF THE FIREARM IN PERSONAL PROTECTION (1980) by Massad F. Ayoob

THE TRUTH ABOUT SELF PROTECTION (1984) by Massad F. Ayoob

THE GUN DIGEST BOOK OF COMBAT HANDGUNNERY (5th edition 2002) and (6th edition 2007) by Massad F. Ayoob

THE GUN DIGEST BOOK OF CONCEALED CARRY by Massad F. Ayoob
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Old March 14, 2016, 05:28 AM   #14
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and here's another suggestion

CONCEALED CARRY FUNDAMENTALS by Michael Martin (2010)

(I took a CCW class from the Gander Mountain Academy about 4 years ago and they gave you a version of this book. It's pretty well written and illustrated and organized)

Lots and LOTs of good books out there these days. Equipment and accessories continue to evolve but much of the basic information that was true 40 years ago is still true now.

Buy a reliable gun you can conceal and control
Buy a good quality holster & belt
Dress around the gun
Practice on a regular basis
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Old March 15, 2016, 05:05 PM   #15
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Trial and error. Unlike guns that don't work out, holsters that don't work out are worth almost nothing on the secondary market. I've probably spent as much on holsters and belts as my carry gun.

Ayoob is the best of the video/book instructors IMO. I haven't been impressed with anything else I have seen. Other instructors might have a moment here or there with great information, but Ayoob can really pack it in his videos and books.

I've found the only holsters that are comfortable IWB or OWB on the belt involve leather somewhere. I have a polymer drop leg holster that is great though.

As already stated, avoid any sort of "size X. Fits all these gunslong list)" holsters Everyone I've tried has turned out to be garbage.

Just generally avoid any of the cheap polymer or nylon holsters. The only thing they have turned out to be good for IMO is to store a firearm. I keep a plastic holster in my glovebox so I can un-holster before entering a CPZ w/o removing my belt or leaving the gun in the glovebox without the trigger covered.

Oh yeah, good belt like the others said.

The most GENERALLY liked IWB holsters seem to be the hybrids and the Crossbreed brand are worth the money IMO. You may get one and hate it though. Not universal.

As far as guns:
I'm gonna guess over half the people active on this forum have a Glock compact or sub-compaGlocks are available used at great prices, especially police trade-ins, they take the abuse of a new to guns owner as well or better than most competitiors, they are about the simplest firearm mechanically(cleaning, repairs, modification), etc. Almost anyone who knows pistols at all will have owned one and be able to give you basic help with one if you have trouble. They may not be "the best" for anyone, but they work for almost everyone.

Last edited by johnwilliamson062; March 15, 2016 at 05:18 PM.
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Old March 17, 2016, 07:28 PM   #16
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A TFL member, Tom Givens (Raylans's weird Uncle) has an absolutely superb book that covers an awful lot Bumble Bug:

http://rangemaster.com/fighting-smarter/
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Old March 17, 2016, 08:09 PM   #17
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Ayoob's In the Gravest Extreme is a decent primer. Tom Givens book linked by Al is a more in depth look at some topics. Chris Bird's The Concealed Handgun Manual might come the closest to what you are looking for. I also suggest Curt Rich's Drive to Survive. Walt Rauch's book Real World Survivals also a decent look at survival.

Like any education, it takes several viewpoints, facets and experiences in order to develop your proficiency. A little exposure to "bad" and "mediocre" is beneficial to be well rounded as knowing the contrarian ideas and methods is still power. I tend to avoid the Narcissistic trainers like Farnam and Stanford who claim to have "The Way", but will read an article from them here and there.
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