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Old January 18, 2018, 04:49 PM   #1
Davion615
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Winchester mod. 06

Can anyone tell me about this rifle? (see attached pics). The serial number is 3683, but it has a patent stamp from 1911. Also, capable of. 22lr... Doesn't seem to add up. Sorry. I couldn't get the entire rifle picture. File size. Too large and compressed too much already.
Attached Images
File Type: jpg 20180109_144330_resized_1.jpg (172.8 KB, 81 views)
File Type: jpg 20180109_144339_resized_1.jpg (150.6 KB, 67 views)
File Type: jpg 20180109_144411_resized_1.jpg (215.2 KB, 66 views)
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Old January 18, 2018, 04:51 PM   #2
Davion615
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Here are three additionals
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File Type: jpg 20180109_144406_resized_1.jpg (203.9 KB, 59 views)
File Type: jpg 20180109_144343_resized_1.jpg (170.6 KB, 58 views)
File Type: jpg 20180109_144313_resized_1-425x756.jpg (95.8 KB, 58 views)

Last edited by Davion615; January 18, 2018 at 04:57 PM.
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Old January 18, 2018, 05:06 PM   #3
Doyle
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This might help:
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Winchester_Model_1906
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Old January 19, 2018, 09:24 PM   #4
James K
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What is the model shown on the upper tang, and where is the 1911 date?
Many parts of the Model 1890 and 1906, including the trigger guards, are interchangeable, so "mixmasters" made by cannibalizing are fairly common.

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Old January 20, 2018, 12:49 AM   #5
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Lots of questions about guns like this. It appears to be a first or second model 1890 (no locking lug cutouts in the frame).

* The serial number would put it in the first year of production for the rifle it belonged to (so 1890 if it is from an 1890, 1905-06 if it is from a 1906).
* It looks like the trigger guard does not match that particular rifle, so Jim may be right that it looks like a mix-master rifle.
* The barrel has been changed, since the 1890 had an octagonal barrel.
* The trigger guard looks like it has been through a fire at some point. If it is the correct trigger guard for that rifle, odds are that the whole rifle went through a fire.
* 1906s had serial numbers on the receiver as well as the trigger guard.
* The forearm is correct for a 1906 first year gun.
* The butt stock looks like a replacement. This may explain why the trigger guard looks like it went through a fire.
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Old January 20, 2018, 10:28 PM   #6
James K
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Another anomaly is that the "no finish" trigger guard does not match the blued frame. There is no way at this point to determine if the rifle was put together in 1910 or 2010, but I am inclined toward the latter date. At this time, when antique firearms are becoming scarce there are more and more turning up in a condition that would never get past an old timer but which are being sold, often at fancy prices to folks who don't know what the old guns should look like.

I note in another forum on this site an 1894 Winchester that has obviously been in bad shape but which has been "restored" by someone with little knowledge of the originals. We will see more of them.

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Old January 20, 2018, 11:11 PM   #7
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And on the other hand, I have seen some mix-master reassembly jobs that apart from being technically incorrect can otherwise be quite tastefully done. Once upon a time, I picked up what superficially looked like a solid-frame model 55 Winchester in good condition. However, the receiver was a model 1894 from the year 1908, the buttstock might have actually come from a model 55, and the barrel and magazine was taken from a model 64. A hodge-podge of parts, well put together, and it shot excellent. Since it wasn't, "correct", it was priced quite reasonably. Like a fool, I traded it off, but at least I got a nice model 70 in the trade. I should have just bought the other rifle and kept both. Live and learn.....
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Old January 22, 2018, 11:23 PM   #8
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Maybe my old eyes are playing tricks, but that picture of the top tang looks like the action is bent.

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Old January 23, 2018, 04:24 AM   #9
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Definitely a first model receiver only made to just after the turn of the century then a 1906 barrel stuffed in the end along with 1906 wood. Like so many this rifle was rebuilt with what was on hand, the steel used in receivers and barrels on 90/06 rifles were quite soft and susceptible to damage.
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