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Old April 25, 2018, 10:28 AM   #1
kraigwy
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100 Year Anniversity of the end of WWI

Found this coin from the US Mint, had to have it to go with my M1917 Eddystone and M1917 S&W.



Its a nice coin, but the rifle looks more like the WWII M1903A3.

Still a good piece to go with my M1917.



My Eddystone was made in Nov. 1918, which means if probably didnt get into battle, Nov. 1918 is a good year for a WWI Rifle.

I like to pick up the orginal field manuels for my vintage US Service Rifles and the M1917 is no different. I have a couple for it including Field Manuel for the US Enfield Rifle, Caliber .30, Model of 1917.

While I'm rambling I might as well keep going.

I found something interesting in this book. As we know in the past the Army developed Gallary Loads for service rifles. Used mostly for the National Guard Units who didnt have access to out door full distant ranges.

This rifle is no exception. In the manuel mentioned. It list, in the ammo section, the Guard Cartidge - E.

This round uses 2nd class bullets having slight imperfections. These rounds are loaded with 9.1 grs. of Bullseye powder giving a velocity of 1201 FPS and works well at 100 yards. The 100 yard range requires the sight elevation to be set at 450 yards. 200 and 300 yards require the elevations of 650 and 850 respectively.

I just read this the other day and want to try it. Except I'm out of bullseye and have to wait tell I get to town.

The M1917 is quite accurate but has the disavantage of not having windage adjustments. The Manual mentioned above has a pretty good Hold Over Chart that has worked successfully for me shooting this rifle in the CMP GSM Vintage Rifle Matches.



My notable feat, or more of an accident, shooting this rifle was at a Maching Gun Shoot at Wall SD. I rented a spot next to a guy shooting a M1919A4. I'm not into auto weapons so I was only shooting my surplus rifles. They had called a cease fire to set out some new targets. One was a fire extinsher which I ranged at 450 yards. After the command of "commence firing" was giving the guy with the 'A4 openned up and fired a full belt at thefire estinsher missing it.

I set the sights to 450 on my Eddystone, took one shot and a cloud of white smoke showed I hit it. The Machine Gunner looked and me and said, "I was shooting AT that", I responded "But I SHOT IT", he laughed and said, "you got me".

I put that gun up. That was a pure accident which I dont think I would repete. The Rifle is capable, but I'm not.

Got to love these old US Rifles. In the accuracy department, they can compete with any of the service rifles out there today.
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Old April 25, 2018, 11:10 AM   #2
aarondhgraham
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That's a cool coin Kraig,,,

And a very cool rifle to pair it with.

Thanks for sharing.

Aarond

.
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Old April 25, 2018, 11:17 AM   #3
RickB
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I've had a WWI Victory lamp for over 50 years.
My grandmother gave it to me for Christmas after my dad put a new power cord on it.
My grandfather was a WWI vet, so the lamp has always been special.
I may take it to the office in the Fall, and put it up in place of my lava lamp.
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Old April 25, 2018, 11:46 AM   #4
Glenn E. Meyer
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There are interesting numismatic relics of WWI. The Germans did propaganda medals. One denounced dum dums - https://thefiringline.com/forums/sho...d.php?t=549488
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Old April 25, 2018, 03:25 PM   #5
RC20
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I too fell in love with the 1917. I will pare the group down one of these days.

I am atahced to the most beat up one, shoots as good as the good looking ones. Kind of like me. Took a licking but has kept on ticking.

I will disagree on the lack of Windage adjustment.

You can move the front sight to get it on at your choice of ranges.

As for the rest, a 2 mph wind blowing from left to right will wreck all the wind-age stuff built into the 19803 sight that you can't see very good anyway.

For all reality, anything past 400 yards (or less if the wind is blowing hard across the sight line) is a guess.

The lift up sight and the peep makes it easy to make those adjustment and you don't have to do drop figuring like a modern scope would need out past 400.

How much did the Coin cost. It would be pretty cool to sell one with each rifle!
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Old April 25, 2018, 05:05 PM   #6
kraigwy
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RC20 you can and I did, drift the front sight to get a "no wind" value.

However, if you're shooting a match, lets say a normal 20 shot string at 600, the wind may, and often does change between shots.

Its not practical, nor safe to be drifting the front sight on the rifle while on the firing line.

Kentucky windage is kind of a must.
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Old April 25, 2018, 07:24 PM   #7
RC20
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Agreed.

But is the lack of "active" windage adjustment an issue?

One you have it spot on, then the spin drift is more than offset (usually) by wind conditions.

Even with a 1903A3 peep, would you try to dial it or Kentucky Windage adjust to the wind?

5 minutes latter it changes (or 5 seconds!).

Offsetting something that is not useful is the raised peep that is for getting you on target for the vertical drop out past 350 or so.

Having your chart is the best windage adjustment!
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Old April 26, 2018, 07:26 AM   #8
kraigwy
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The Ladder sights of the US weapons, (M1873, US Krag, M1917, and M1903s had adjustments built in to the sight to compensate for "spin drift" (drift caused by the spin of the bullet).
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Old April 27, 2018, 03:04 PM   #9
RC20
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Sorry, I get em mixed up at times

Once you get the front sight on, you are golden with a 1917.
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