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Old February 12, 2018, 03:25 PM   #1
nanney1
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Range Officer inspection

I'm new to shooting and have been to three public and one private range since October.

Indoor range - RO's inspects weapons and ammo.
Private range - CC class qualification - RO's inspect weapons and ammo.
Outdoor range - RO's inspects weapons and ammo.

Super duper nice indoor range and retail store. First time at the counter, I present my firearms and ammo for inspection. RO at the counter doesn't even really look and says you're good. I presented the two guns with slide and cylinder open. He didn't pick them up and he didn't open up any of the ammo boxes. None of the RO's in the range looked either.

On my second trip to the super nice facility, I didn't even open up my bag. I was given a lane and sent in without anyone checking.

My feeling is that the first 3 ranges did the normal and proper thing and that the nice place did not. Does that seem odd or is it normal for some ranges not to inspect?
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Old February 12, 2018, 03:41 PM   #2
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Range rules, differ

RSO's follow whatever the range and CRSO have set down. In short, you will find that each range has it's own set of rules with many common elements. Even though the NRA certifies the RSO's. The club rules, SOP's and guidelines, are dictate how a range is run. Whenever you go to a range, it's up to you to question and be informed, on the rules. All the clubs I have shot have most of their rules posted. I have never seen an RSO that was not willing to work with you. .....

Be Safe !!!
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Last edited by Pahoo; February 12, 2018 at 04:19 PM.
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Old February 12, 2018, 03:44 PM   #3
ammo.crafter
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inspection

I never experienced a range inspection and wonder what the motive might be.

The ammo inspection may be something that ranges who sell ammo do to discourage "outside" ammo from being used at that range.

Inspecting firearms and permitting them to be used appears to shift liability from the shooter to the range inspector should a firearm-related jury occurs.
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Old February 12, 2018, 03:45 PM   #4
Bartholomew Roberts
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I’ve never heard of an RO inspecting weapons beyond just making sure you weren’t using rifles on the pistol range. Most indoor ranges will check ammo to make sure you aren’t doing undue damage to the backstops with some old steel-core surplus (and some of them just don’t want your steel or aluminium trash cases mixed in with their brass).

I’ve never had an an outdoor range check ammo. They typically just have you sign the range rules and away you go. Probably because dirt is cheap and harder to damage based on ammo selection as backstops go.
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Old February 12, 2018, 04:05 PM   #5
southjk
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I go to three different indoor ranges in my area and I've never had anyone want to inspect my gear before I shoot. I wouldn't object but it's just never happened.
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Old February 12, 2018, 04:07 PM   #6
zincwarrior
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I have never had my firearms "inspected." I would walk right out the door if they tried.
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Old February 12, 2018, 04:27 PM   #7
Pahoo
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The range sets it's own Rules and SOP's

Quote:
The ammo inspection may be something that ranges who sell ammo do to discourage "outside" ammo from being used at that range.
Again, it varies and on ammo, some have restrictions on calibers and even reloads. Another example if full-auto and .50-BMG. I don't have one so I hope I have this right. Again, it will differ from range to range as documented in the SOP's and officers. ......

Again;
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Old February 12, 2018, 04:28 PM   #8
Damon555
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I've been to dozens of ranges both public and private.....Never had anything inspected at any of them.
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Old February 12, 2018, 04:42 PM   #9
Lohman446
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The one indoor range I go to uncasing or unholstering your firearm outside of a lane is grounds for removal. There is no inspection though there are rules regarding ammunition use (no reloads, no steel cases, etc.)
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Old February 12, 2018, 04:46 PM   #10
TailGator
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The range I use most often doesn't inspect my range bag or anyone else's. They just expect safe handling to be practiced, including during the process of unpacking.

My second-most-used range has a policy of examining pistols to be sure they are unloaded as they are unpacked. It isn't anything obtrusive - mags out and actions open before moving them to the firing line. When the range is cold, they walk down the line to see that actions are open and empty before they allow anyone to tend targets, too.

I might be offended if someone insisted on handling my firearms, working actions, or whatever. Glancing at them to be sure they are clear is not offensive to me. We have some shooters these days that need a little help keeping everyone safe.
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Old February 12, 2018, 05:48 PM   #11
nanney1
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I guess the inspection was just something I got used to and expected. I guess their waiver and video spells out the guidelines and that's it. Of course, the other public ranges also had a waiver and video.

The RO's at this facility are the most helpful of the places I've gone and extremely friendly and accomodating. I would expect that their hiring process includes exceptional customer service training.
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Old February 12, 2018, 06:01 PM   #12
Marco Califo
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One indoor range examined my G26 once. There was no need, IMO, but I went with the program. They thought I needed oil on my slide. I run it with minimal lube. The range was in downtown Los Angeles (adjacent to Koreatown), Korean staffed, and my date was a semi hot Korean nurse gal. So, I think there was more at play than the lube on my slide.

My outdoor range does not check, except only on the Long Range rifle range, when the cease fire is called and the RO walks the line for actions open and mags out before anyone can go down range. While doing this he carries a magnet and will check for steel jacket bullets, flashed with copper, which are not allowed on forest lands by the Feds. Now if you have an "assault rifle", or full auto you need to have the papers to show.

It is very normal in my state for every indoor range to inspect AMMO and tell you what they will and wont allow. This is not so much about them selling their reloads. It is to ensure compliance with "no exposed lead", no tracer, etc. They require FMJ or plated. Their reloads are almost always plated, and mid-range. Inspecting firearms varies, but some demand actions open/guns on the counter. I believe this is so they can distinguish between customers and armed robbers or psychos.

One or two places MAY require you purchase range reloads, on your first visit, or if you rent one of there guns, or you are shooting a qualification course.

So, if you want to experiment with hot loads in a hand cannon, you cannot assume every neighborhood range will let you do so.
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Old February 12, 2018, 06:05 PM   #13
Aguila Blanca
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Quote:
Originally Posted by nanney1
My feeling is that the first 3 ranges did the normal and proper thing and that the nice place did not. Does that seem odd or is it normal for some ranges not to inspect?
I'm 74 years old. I've been shooting handguns for more than 50 years. I've shot at indoor and outdoor ranges in multiple states. I have NEVER been to any range, indoor or outdoor, where they asked to inspect my firearm(s) before allowing me to shoot. And I have never heard anyone else say it has happened to them.
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Old February 12, 2018, 06:39 PM   #14
Janders
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I am 61 years old. I am an RSO, I have never had my firearms inspected either.
I agree, It's up to the individual Chief Range Safety Officer to make and enforce the safety rules. That's what it's all about=SAFETY. I would assume the RSO's keep an eye on the operation and watch for unsafe activities. At least I hope they are watching.
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Old February 12, 2018, 07:31 PM   #15
Pahoo
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Know and follow the rules.

Quote:
I agree, It's up to the individual Chief Range Safety Officer to make and enforce the safety rules
As defined in "their" Standing Operating Procedure". It's not complicated but can get involved and detailed.

Be Safe !!!
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Old February 12, 2018, 07:44 PM   #16
cjwils
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In my area they never ask to inspect my guns. I would feel uncomfortable about that, especially since many of my guns are much older than the range officers are. They often, but not always, inspect ammo to be sure that I do not have steel or aluminum cases. They want only brass cases so they can sweep up all empty cases off the floor to sell the brass for recycling without having to separate out any steel and aluminum. They do allow my reloads at these ranges, provided I use at least semi-jacketed bullets. No all lead bullets except .22 rim fire.
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Old February 12, 2018, 08:28 PM   #17
johnwilliamson062
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The only time I have had an RSO inspect my weapon was on an indoor military range. I have never had anymore than casual visual inspection and possibly asking what I am shooting.
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Old February 12, 2018, 09:10 PM   #18
FrankenMauser
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Quote:
I never experienced a range inspection and wonder what the motive might be.

The ammo inspection may be something that ranges who sell ammo do to discourage "outside" ammo from being used at that range.

Inspecting firearms and permitting them to be used appears to shift liability from the shooter to the range inspector should a firearm-related jury occurs.
The inspection is to make sure the customer isn't planning to shoot something prohibited or dangerous on the range.
For example: Run through this very forum and you'll find two threads in the last year about ranges burning to the ground because idiots ignored the rules and fired tracers. (One was fairly recent.)
Go back a few more years, and you'll find an incident where a rifle was allowed on a range only rated for handguns, after-hours by an employee. The shooter lost control, launched several rounds through a section of the roof, and injured a person several blocks away.

There are idiots everywhere, and range owners must exercise some CYA.


But some will work with you.
In 2009, I bought a .327 Federal GP100. That particular shop had an indoor range on site, and gave away three free 30-minute shooting sessions with each gun purchase.
They prohibited outside ammunition, and the usual suspects (AP, incendiary, tracers, reloads, etc. - even if sold in their store) ... because range repairs are expensive, and there are too many morons in this world.

They did not, however, carry .327 Federal ammunition. When I was given the range passes, I told them very frankly that I'd be bringing my own handloads when I returned to shoot. They nodded in agreement, and I had no issues when I showed up to use one of those range passes, while packing nothing but handloaded ammunition in the range bag. The other guy on the range, shooting a half-dozen different 9mms, though? He had to buy WWB off the store's shelves.
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Old February 12, 2018, 09:31 PM   #19
BillG174
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I shoot have very nice indoor range which is a national shooting sports foundation five star range.

The only rule is that all pistols must be holstered or have the actions open when you enter the facility. Sounds reasonable to me. There are no inspections made of the firearms or the ammunition


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Old February 12, 2018, 11:37 PM   #20
Charlie_98
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The range I go to only inspects your ammo if you are shooting 5.56mm or 7.62mm... for tracers and AP. If you have mags loaded up, they used to make you unload them... now I just don't tell them, and show them a box of what I have instead. They do not inspect your gun... I've never heard of that to be honest.

I have had ranges get testy about FMJ ammo, I don't shoot at those ranges any longer.
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Old February 13, 2018, 12:49 AM   #21
Calisnaps
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Of the two ranges I have gone to, neither of them has even asked to see my weapon, they do check my ammunition with a magnet to make sure there isn't any steel cases or ammunition.
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Old February 13, 2018, 12:52 AM   #22
SamNavy
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Quote:
I guess the inspection was just something I got used to and expected. I guess their waiver and video spells out the guidelines and that's it. Of course, the other public ranges also had a waiver and video.

The RO's at this facility are the most helpful of the places I've gone and extremely friendly and accomodating. I would expect that their hiring process includes exceptional customer service training.
I think at this point, you should probably tell us where you live and where these ranges are. 3 local ranges doing something that most of us here have never experienced seems like something that may be beyond a local mandate or "required by insurance". I know of no state or local USA law that requires a range to inspect arms.

In an extreme example or zealous safety, I think I remember reading somewhere that shooting ranges in Australia actually have their rental pistols tied down with cables so that they only point downrange... I don't suppose you live outside the US?

EDIT, found the article:
http://www.thefirearmblog.com/blog/2...-indoor-range/
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Old February 13, 2018, 05:57 AM   #23
Rob228
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The most I've ever had is a magnet run over my ammo.
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Old February 13, 2018, 08:38 AM   #24
RETG
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Closest to an inspection was at a Bass Pro in MI. And all he did was place a specially marked tie strap over the range bag with the guns in it and didn't care at all about the concealed gun under my shirt.
At the range upstairs, the guy cut the tie strap, and when I left placed a new strap on the bags handles.
I guess this was to make sure I did not fill the bag up with stolen merchandise.
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Old February 13, 2018, 03:53 PM   #25
Longhorn1986
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Most indoor ranges around here may take a quick look at ammo, looking for non-brass, the first or second time you shoot with them. However, there is one local range that inspected my ammo every single time I went, even though they knew who I was and knew what ammo I used. I decided after the 4th or 5th time, if they couldn't show me any more respect than that, I could find somewhere else to shoot. I get it. Their range, their rules. On the other hand, my money, my time, my choice on who to patronize as a loyal customer. I haven't been back since.
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