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View Poll Results: Long range rifle shooting Poll
100 Yards 1 1.03%
200 Yards 15 15.46%
500 Yards 39 40.21%
600 Yards 27 27.84%
800 Yards 11 11.34%
1000 Yards 10 10.31%
1760 Yards (1 mile) 4 4.12%
1 Mile+ 4 4.12%
None of the above, see my explainations 3 3.09%
Multiple Choice Poll. Voters: 97. You may not vote on this poll

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Old November 29, 2017, 03:09 PM   #26
Zen Archery
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No empirical chart.
Depends on the caliber of gun?
.22 and a .50 cal. are gong to differ.
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Old November 29, 2017, 03:53 PM   #27
Wyosmith
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For me "long distance" is 600 to 1000 yards for fun shooting at targets with a rifle.

"Long distance" with a revolver is 300 yards for targets and never over 75 yards any more on big game. I have made several kills on antelope and deer at 125 to 150 with revolvers, but I was a better shot in those days. I lack the confidence to do it now at my age, so 75 yards is now my limit for hunting.

550 yards is my self imposed maximum range for hunting any big game with a scoped rifle. I'd feel like a fool if I shot at game farther then I have to, and I am a good enough hunter that I VERY SELDOM have any reason to fire over 300. I have lived in Wyoming for 24 years now and we are the state that is known for Antelope and Prairie Dogs. Yet in 24 years I have only killed 3 big-game animals at 400 yards and none in Wyoming over 465 yet. No need. No ethical reason to do it or even try it.

Varmints I'll try at any range.
I have made quite a few Prairie Dog kills at about 500, and about a dozen Rock Chuck kills at a bit over 700. My longest kill in my life on a coyote was also a bit over 700.
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Old November 29, 2017, 04:38 PM   #28
johnwilliamson062
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I would disagree that drop is the characteristic that qualifies for long range. Drop due to range is easily predicted, tested, and adjusted. If target shooting one needs to make minor drop adjustments at almost any range off the zero'd range.
I selected the 357 max as my hunting cartridge based on it having the flattest trajectory of legal cartridges in my state for whitetail, but I still don't hold the same at 50 and 200 yards.
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Old November 29, 2017, 04:48 PM   #29
BBarn
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What I would consider "long range" depends on some variables. For hunting, if it's just me and a rifle with a sling, anything over 300 yds if I can get a shot from prone (probably only 100yds or so offhand). If I also have a range finder and some sort of portable rest I can easily carry, anything over 400 yds. And that assumes little wind.

Beyond 500 yds I got no business shooting at anything other than paper and such.
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Old November 30, 2017, 08:08 AM   #30
Mobuck
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"Whether it's for hunting or target shooting, the question is simple, what distance, in yards do you consider "long range"?"

There is a BIG difference between hunting and target shooting. I'll throw bullets at a target much farther than I would at a game animal. Just last week on an elk hunt, I heard some guys talking about "ringing steel" up to 900 yards. OK, they must be good shots(?). Unfortunately, when it came time to shoot an elk, 350 yards was "beyond the capability" and a miss occurred.
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Old November 30, 2017, 12:14 PM   #31
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I live Co and units I hunt there is DOW rifle range and it's pretty full before season opens for resident to non resident. It surprising how busy that range gets day or two after opening weekend.
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Old November 30, 2017, 01:01 PM   #32
5whiskey
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Quote:
600 is the start of long range for target shooting.
This reflects my opinion and experience. Doping your sights out at 500 and 600 can be tricky, and range estimation is pretty critical, but it's beyond 600 where things become much more difficult. Range estimation is very crucial past 600 yds. If you're off by as little as 30-40 yards in range estimation, you could see additional bullet drop (or lack of drop) by more than 1-2 feet depending on the cartridge. Is that target 640 yards or 680 yards? You better get it right if you want to make a hit.

As has also been mentioned, weather conditions play a much greater role out at this distance as well.
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Old November 30, 2017, 01:39 PM   #33
OzeanJaeger
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Quote:
There is a BIG difference between hunting and target shooting. I'll throw bullets at a target much farther than I would at a game animal. Just last week on an elk hunt, I heard some guys talking about "ringing steel" up to 900 yards. OK, they must be good shots(?). Unfortunately, when it came time to shoot an elk, 350 yards was "beyond the capability" and a miss occurred.
At my range there is a 4' AR500 disc @ 700yds. That's almost a 7moa target. Guys hit it with iron sights all the time. I have a full AR500 IDPA silhouette 18"X24" (without the head). That's effectively a one minute target @ 1,800 yds. I have nothing that will send it 1,800 yds. It's a 1.5min @ 1,200 which is all I have dope for.

The claim they can ring steel @ 900yds is as meaningless as the claims someone has a 1/4 minute off the rack rifle.

The kill zone on a deer is about 6", so you're shooting a 1moa target @ 600 yds; a looong hunting shot. There few hunters who can shoot beyond that and call it "ethical" with a straight face, IMO. I don't hunt with a high powered scope (would drive me nuts), so my crosshairs are covering the whole deer at that range. For me about 400yds is max hunting, and then it would have to be under certain conditions (like a stable shooting position).
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Old November 30, 2017, 04:57 PM   #34
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600 is reasonable but have reached out to 1000 yards with an .06 and 800 with a .45-70. All depends.
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Old December 1, 2017, 01:15 AM   #35
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Hunter-300 yards is the longest shot I will generally take.
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Old December 1, 2017, 11:32 AM   #36
Don Fischer
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What is the difference between shooting 400yds and 600yds? Both should require the same skill's.
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Old December 1, 2017, 11:41 AM   #37
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I've had several one-shot kills on deer out to 350 yards with my .270 Win rifle, but that's my upper limit for hunting. Target shooting is different, as long as there's a safe backstop.

Being able to target shoot 1/2 MOA at 1,000 yards takes a great rifle, ammo, and careful sighting/wind knowledge, but no living thing gets hurt and dies a miserable death if you miss. Moreover, with good spotting, corrections can be made for another shot on the range.

Farthest I've ever shot on paper was 450 yards (lasered), when I fired one 3.5" three-shot group to find out how much drop was involved with ballistic tip handloads.

I consider the group pretty impressive, considering wind and mirage at the time. That distance is the limit I can see to shoot over the blueberry fields behind the house, due to terrain.
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Old December 1, 2017, 01:10 PM   #38
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What is the difference between shooting 400yds and 600yds? Both should require the same skill's
300 yards (or just shy of) is your typical point blank range for many high-power rifle calibers. Using .270 as an example, the drop from 300-400 will run from 12-16" or so. That's a lot, but as long as your range estimation is no more than 50 yards off, you will still hit somewhere in a 8" circle. The drop from 600 to 700 is about 40". Your window to hit that 8" circle narrows a great deal. You better be sure it's 640 yards and not 680 yards. Wind drift plays a much larger role as well. As a matter of fact, everything is magnified by range. Slightly lower velocity due to below freezing temps? You won't even notice it at under 300 yards, and probably barely at 600. Out further? It can make a big difference. All of the same skills come into play, it's just that you must be much better because the margin for error is much smaller.
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Old December 1, 2017, 06:11 PM   #39
ndking1126
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I put 600 and that's for shooting at gongs from a bench. That number comes more from a lack of access to a range where I can shoot farther. For hunting 400 yards is about all I'm comfortable with given my current equipment and assuming good conditions are in place ( solid rest, little to no wind, distance confirmed with range finder etc).
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Old December 1, 2017, 07:43 PM   #40
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I voted 200 yards. My local range only goes up to 100 yards and my hunting rifles are 35 Remington. 200 yards is pushing it for my equipment and my modest skill level.

Kudos to those of you that can hit stuff at longer ranges. I may never know of my max abillity.
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Old December 1, 2017, 09:00 PM   #41
KW Gary M
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I selected 1,000 yards in the poll only because the range I have a membership to just added a 1,000 yard range but realistically, 500 yards and up would class as "Long Distance" shooting.
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Old December 7, 2017, 05:55 PM   #42
TXAZ
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It’s interesting to read the comments.
I expect if most ranges went to 500 yards, 600 would be the most popular answer. (Etc)
But without a lot of qualifications, the question is solely up to you, individually: For a rifle, what’s long to you.
Interesting comments.
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