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Old August 23, 2015, 03:37 PM   #1
hooligan1
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1924 Yugoslavia Mauser

What would a 90%, all numbers matching, including stock, ( all cartouches are crisp and legible) all sling mounts, perfect action and bore, only no cleaning rod or bayonet be valued at? It has super nice blueing and very little blems in the steel. Stock has dents but not beaten up terribly.
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Old August 24, 2015, 08:39 AM   #2
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Big 5 was selling a batch of similar condition guns a couple months ago for $249. Probably a good starting point unless you can find something that makes your gun exceptional.
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Old August 24, 2015, 09:53 AM   #3
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Really the only thing exceptional about it is the condition of the blueing and the action looks like it just came out of the mill.
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Old August 28, 2015, 03:59 PM   #4
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Also took care and measured bore, seems its an 8x57j, not the 8x57 js.
Anybody know if there is any problem finding ammunition for my rifle?
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Old August 28, 2015, 04:31 PM   #5
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The transition from 8x57I to 8x57 IS happened before WWI. AFAIK no new guns used militarily were made for the old cartridge after the war.
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Old August 28, 2015, 08:45 PM   #6
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The bore size changed in 1905, so anything made after would be .323.

You rifle will shoot any commercial ammo marked "8mm Mauser" or "8X57JS" or "8X57 IS", or any available surplus if you can find it, or even new production military spec ammo.

Be advised, the US manufactured stuff is underpowered, and your rifle may shoot low.
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Old August 29, 2015, 05:33 AM   #7
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Bore measures .318 from groove to groove...maybe a second measuring is in order..
And if it is actually .318, what the heck do I have here?
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Old August 29, 2015, 05:58 AM   #8
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It definitely measures .318 in the grooves, and .311 on the rifling..4 lands..
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Old August 29, 2015, 08:17 AM   #9
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Even if it does, don't bother. The Germans used the tight barrels with the new ammo just fine, the only thing they changed was the leade shape. And the Yugo army used standard 8x57 IS ammo from the beginning.
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Old August 29, 2015, 10:54 AM   #10
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M1924 Yugo Mauser ? Not a "24/47" ? An original M1924, in 90 % condition ??? I find that very hard to believe.

Even the original M1924's were barreled with 0.323 (7.92 x 57 IS) barrels, let alone the post-WW2 24/47's. So, whichever model the rifle actually is, a 0.318 barrel is VERY VERY unlikely.....unless someone re-barreled the rifle. IF it is actually a 90 %, original M1924.....with a 0.318 barrel.....you've got a real unicorn. Literally, a one in a million.

As for ammo, DO NOT shoot 0.323 (7.92 x 57 IS) ammo through a 0.318 barrel, unless a super-weak load ! Even then, I wouldn't do it, though many have. Much of the US available 8mm Mauser ammo is loaded lightly, though using 0.323 bullets, for this very reason (as well as the reason of old rifles, of varying condition). Even then, I would not do it. IF you do have a 0.318 barrel, shoot 0.318 bullets....which will probably mean handloads. I doubt that you'll find 0.318 ammo - and not many 0.318 bullets for reloading, at that.
There are some around, but not cheap or common.

One possibility you will have, in order to do this safely and properly, is to load CAST bullets. An oversized cast bullet can be used safely, or oversized bullets sized down to fit. You can buy 0.321" diameter cast bullets and load them in 8mm Mauser cases, to make a workable load. These would still have to be loaded light though, as the cast bullets can't take as much velocity as jacketed.
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Old August 29, 2015, 10:58 AM   #11
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How did you measure it?
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Old August 29, 2015, 12:13 PM   #12
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I measured the bore with my digital caliper.
Unicorn? Don't know how that could be a one in a million...
I won't shoot oversized ammunition through it, already missing too many teeth. As soon as I can, I will try to post pics on this thread.
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Old August 29, 2015, 01:08 PM   #13
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Pound a soft lead round ball or fishing weight through the bore using a brass rod.

Then measure using a micrometer, not a caliper.

If you measured near the muzzle it may very well be undersized, not uncommon for rifles to get tighter near the muzzle if the barrel was manufactured and installed correctly.

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Old August 29, 2015, 01:31 PM   #14
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Pics

Helping out ...



Attached Images
File Type: jpg 20150807_160344a.jpg (77.9 KB, 13 views)
File Type: jpg 20150807_160419a.jpg (71.0 KB, 13 views)
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Old August 29, 2015, 02:12 PM   #15
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Jimro I will do that.
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Old August 29, 2015, 05:14 PM   #16
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I have no idea of the value of a M1924 pre War Yugo. I have one. Due to the duffle bag cut on the stock, I think mine was a GI bring back.

What your pictures don't show, and what people don't know because original pre war M1924's are so rare, is that the pre war rifles are very well made. The flood of Communist rebuilds that came in are not representative of the quality of pre war rifles. In many cases the Communist rebuilds are rough and irregular. Sure they will go bang, but the fit and finish is inferior to the pre war.

I am going to say, based on the inspection of my rifle, that the original M1924's are as well built as any Mauser military rifle, showing precise machining, nice wood to metal fit.
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Old August 29, 2015, 05:28 PM   #17
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Oh I know Slamfire, this rifle is clean. I like it, and Im not sure if its rare, probably not but thats okay, since I've had it, it hasn't eaten any oats.
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Old August 29, 2015, 10:59 PM   #18
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FWIW, the problem of shooting a .323 bullet in the old rifles is not a matter of bore diameter, but of the neck of the old chamber being too tight for the larger cartridge neck to expand and release the bullet properly, with a consequent rise in pressure. All the Germans did to convert the old Model 1888 rifles to the new cartridge was to run in a new chambering reamer.

By 1924, no one was making military rifles for the old "j" cartridge; that Model 24, whether made in Belgium or in Yugoslavia (the left side marking will tell), was made for the standard German 7.9 (civilian 8x57js) cartridge.

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Old August 30, 2015, 12:08 PM   #19
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Crisis averted! After proper "bore slugging" the slug measured a perfect .323.
So yes Im gonna shoot this dude...

Thanks for helping me on this fellas.
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Old September 1, 2015, 06:35 PM   #20
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I have a Yugo K98 rebuild, new barrel, looks good. It has a .328 barrel. Can't stay on a pie plate at 100 yards with 8 X 57 mm ammunition.

The pre war rifles are much better than the rebuilds.
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Old September 3, 2015, 06:37 AM   #21
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Took mine to the range and shot it at 25 yds, three inches low but nice group with 196 fmj,. I will learn to make it hit out to 100.
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Old November 12, 2015, 08:12 AM   #22
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I bought a used m98 yugo mauser for $260. Great condition overall but the stock was bubba hack bedded to accept a clamp on reciever scope mount. It's a decent shooter. I'm at about 3 moa at 200 meters. I do get an ocassional wild flier off a 9" pie plate.
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