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Old November 11, 2018, 04:39 PM   #1
Rachen
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Reevaluating the EDC Kit: Flashlights and Knives

Being prepared does not just involve owning, practicing with, and carrying a CCW handgun. Preparedness means being able to respond to the many issues and problems that are faced every day in life, as well as more rare but serious situations that really call for some mental arithmetics.

This is somewhat a gear review, mainly because of a new addition I had made to my EDC gear: the Fenix UC35-V2.0 Li-Ion rechargeable tactical flashlight. To put it in a few words, this is one of the brightest and most powerful flashlights I have ever seen and I have handled a lot of flashlights over the years. This one practically stopped me dead in my tracks. 1000 lumens and 3500mAH of power all conveniently packed into a durable aluminum and steel case around the size of most police-issued cans of OC spray. Cannot go wrong with that right?

Now in addition to being a gun nut I am also a sort of light nut. Having done various physical jobs in warehouses, construction sites and on large vehicles means that I just don't like being caught in the dark. While I am not that old, I am still a 90's kid who have seen the final days and death throes of incandescent utility lighting. When I was very young I was given a Maglite Solitaire AAA as a present. The thing fit on a keychain, had a twist knob and cranked out 2 lumens with a tiny replaceable xenon bulb. And best of all, it ran off of one single AAA ni-cad battery. And for a bit my young mind thought that was the coolest thing to ever exist.

For several years prior to this post, my main EDC light for work, home and tactical use had been a Mini Maglite LED with 100 lumen yield. And that thing is absolutely bright. It also has four modes selectable by rapidly turning the lamp head. High, Low, Strobe and SOS. At full power you cannot even look at the point of impact of the beam on a wall 5 feet away. Yeah, that kind of focused and intense. Even on low power, I can point that thing right up at the ceiling and the backscatter of light around the room would make an entire living room comfortably illuminated enough for the family to enjoy supper in case there was a power outage.

The old Mini Mag is still part of my traveling kit that I keep in the truck but for belt carry it has since been supplanted by the Fenix UC35 powerhouse. In just a 15 year span, LED technology has leaped forward with almost frightening speed. I remember when the first novelty high powered LEDs came onto the scene and for a brief time, they were just that...Novelty. For fair displays and gaming convention ads. And now, we have pinhole sized devices that can illuminate an entire stretch of road ahead of you. Enter Fenix and CREE onto the scene. It seems like China is really serious about dominating the high tech sector of the market. Holographic displays already in use in the J-20 fighter and the T-99D series of MBTs. In a year these are going to enter the US market and completely revolutionize gaming, VR and industrial mechanics.

Here is a little about the Fenix UC35 and an overall description of it's operation: The reason why the V2.0 is added after it's name is because it is indeed an improved 2nd version of the already popular 2017 model. It has a lot of things that the 2017 edition didn't have, like a rubber coated tail switch for easier control and a battery life indicator built into the side switch. It comes with a super high-capacity 3500mAH Li-Ion rechargeable/removable battery included. One of the best things about this light is that it is micro-USB rechargeable. Just plug it in and wait for the red LED on the side switch to turn green and you are good to go. Takes only about 2.5 hours when charging from 0% out the box. I can use the same cord as my LG touchscreen and charge it using any USB port, 12-V automotive port or one of my high powered laptop external battery packs. The internal battery can also be removed and Fenix has spare Li-Ion 18650s from 2600 to 3500mAH range so you can have a couple of extra batteries charged and ready to go.

OPERATION: Using the light is easy. One click of the tail switch turns it ON. To cycle through the 5 modes use the side switch. ECO: 2 lumen, LOW: 50 lumen, MED: 150 lumen, HIGH: 400 lumen, TURBO: 1000 lumen. Battery life is 800 hours on ECO and 3 hours on TURBO. When you first turn the unit on, the LED on the side switch also gives you a reading of the battery life. Steady green means above 85%. Flashing green= under 85% above 50%. Steady red= under 50% and flashing red= under 25%. NOTE: This indicator will only work when using the light with the 2600-3500mAH Fenix batteries. The unit can also run on two CR123 cells but the indicator will not work for those.

PERFORMANCE: When I say that these things are bright, bright is actually a sadly inaccurate understatement. It is overwhelming. Even on ECO, it is more than adequate to conduct a nighttime pre-trip engine inspection on a truck and a glance at the undercarriage assembly. On LOW, it completely overpowers any of the Maglites. One of the things which makes this unit so powerful is not just the lumens, but the focusing array in the lens. Sure, it produces 1000 lumens on TURBO at the aperture, but the focusing mirror projects that same beam up to 285 feet without losing any intensity so you practically have laser-like accuracy and intensity. Even on a clear, dry and cold night, the beam itself is visible in the air, solid and straight. Blast that thing inside a room? On TURBO that is akin to early afternoon sunlight on a summer day. Even looking at the spot on the wall 10ft away is hurtful and is not recommended. The same precautions pertaining to lasers also go hand in hand with these high powered LED units. Because they can and will cause severe eye damage even under very short term direct exposure. So know what you are doing and don't engage in horseplay with them.

So what is the final conclusion? The Fenix UC35-V2.0 and all of the other Fenix products introduced on and after the inception of the 2.0 represents a quantum leap in technology that only happened in the very near past, within the last 10 years. Akin to the terabyte capacity storage devices that can give any regular desktop, supercomputer performance. The light itself is constructed from a durable aluminum/steel frame with the middle gripping portion entirely free of any switches or ports, so it might even be useable in any one of the many weapon-mounted light brackets out there. And the tail power switch makes it really easy to operate, both as a handgun/rifle light and a regular unit for one-hand use. My CCW handgun is a Model 1858 Remington revolver with a .45LC conversion cylinder so I am used to using the left hand to hold a flashlight under the gun if I ever need to use it in that manner. One click with the thumb and the night turns into day covering 200 feet in front of me. The unit also comes with a pretty durable flap belt holster with Velcro fastenings that will take a quite lot of abuse from work and outdoor sporting activity. Or you can use one of your spare magazine pouches to carry the unit. Yes, you heard that correctly. The light will fit perfectly into any semi-auto magazine holster. The only negative thing I can find in the UC35-V2.0 is that the designer could have fitted the unit with a crenelated strike bezel like some of the Surefire lights have. That would greatly increase the utility potential of this powerful light. As a stunning device as well as an impact tool if push really comes to shove. And that takes us to the next must-have item on anyone's EDC list: a knife.

Or more accurately, a tactical folding knife with an assisted-opening mechanism. In my opinion over the years these are the most versatile and convenient for everyday carry as opposed to stronger but more problematic fixed-blades. Fixed blades may be illegal in some areas. And some of the most effective ones can be quite big...Big enough that carrying them around may attract attention. Tactical folders combine the best of several worlds. Contrary to what many people think, assisted-openers are NOT switchblades and are legal to own/carry/sell in most jurisdictions. If it is ever needed, they can be deployed very quickly via a switch located on the upper spine. This is basically a carry-over from my responses on another thread titled "Is there such thing as too close"? If you were to find yourself in a really grimy scenario where a firearm could not be deployed, a knife may just be the order of the day, such as in a grappling situation or if the BG really have you pinned against something. My current EDC, and one that I have been carrying for the last 3 years, is the Schrade SCHA6LBS with a 3.75" blade. Very hefty and solid piece of gear and it can be used as an impact tool when folded up as well. And knives are not just weapons. They are tools and I can see many situations where a good tool like the Schrade would be useful, and I am not even talking about outdoor sporting activities yet.

On another gun board in the past someone mentioned that "a man should always have on him something to cut with and something to start a fire with". Well, a good flashlight and a good knife definitely belongs on any EDC kit. I am not really a smoker, sometimes roll my own plugs with loose tobacco but I always got a Zippo fueled up and in a another pouch on my belt.

For more info on the Fenix UC35-V2.0, it can be found here:
https://www.fenix-store.com/fenix-uc...t-1000-lumens/
You can also read other reviews and purchase the unit on that site.
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Last edited by Rachen; November 11, 2018 at 04:55 PM.
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Old November 12, 2018, 02:33 PM   #2
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Nice write up on the light. I've carried a Olight T10 for years. It is quite a bit smaller than your Fenix, making it easy to pack, but it's top setting isn't nearly as bright.

The Fenix sounds like it has a lot of features and performance for the money.

Carrying a knife as a weapon is prohibited here in Ohio, but I always carry one as a tool- usually a Benchmade folder or a sub-3" fixed blade. I always have a Victorinox Mini-Champ in my pocket as well.

I can't imagine not carrying a light and knife all the time as I use both every day.

Your tastes seem rather eclectic- state of the art flashlight combined with a 19th Century pistol design.
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Old November 12, 2018, 04:39 PM   #3
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I have always carried a small gentleman knife along with a defensive folder.. I cant imagine being without knives.

I generally carry a single AA or single AAA Fenix or surefire in my pocket and always have a 2xAA Fenix in all my cars. That said, I have never had any practical use for 1000lums. I do not need a ship to shore light and I don't need to signal passing aircraft. I prefer 55-75lum for tasking, 3-7 for discreet use and 175-300 if I need to look across the road or around the property. Anything more than that is just impractical for my use.
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Old November 12, 2018, 05:22 PM   #4
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The Fenix35 is a good light. I have the version that is rechargeable with a cell phone USB. It lasts almost forever on the lowest setting. It's my truck light.

For EDC carry I prefer the Fenix E12. It takes one AA battery and has three brightness settings. Brightness and battery life is impressive for it's size. I keep several around in strategic locations.

Fenix also offers the LD02 which is tiny, yet bright and long lasting.
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Old November 12, 2018, 08:29 PM   #5
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LOL I mainly use the '58 for camping trips, but yesterday I had it out on my desk right next to my Fenix and my LG phone and I thought wow! too. They represent so many years apart, yet they are perfectly designed for their individual jobs and I have complete faith they will function reliably when I use them.

Also regarding 1000 lumens as too high: That is why there is a selector function on the light It's good to know that if I really need the 1000 lumen, I can readily produce it by pressing a button. Just like firearms, fire extinguishers and first-aid kits, it's about having them. But usually I use ECO and LOW when I am doing work household repairs. And MED is more than enough to turn even the darkest warehouse sections and storage areas into full day.
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Old November 13, 2018, 12:06 PM   #6
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I just switched my light and folder for EDC. While I carry a larger light and knife in each vehicle, I want something light and convenient on me.

I went with a Fenix PD25. Output is 5, 50, 150, 550 Lumens with a strobe. The battery is USB rechargeable and can take CR123A or 16340. I started to carry the Boker AK74 as an EDC knife. I carry both on my left side and I had a Kydex pouch made to carry the light and a spare magazine. It works great.
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Old November 13, 2018, 12:59 PM   #7
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I've always been a bit leery of lights with a separate setting switch built into the body of the light. I guess my concern is I would go to deploy it and if I'd previously had it on the max setting and I negligently pressed the setting button I'd now drop my lumens way down to the lowest setting, which is often more like a moonlight setting. That said, I do think lights that have some variability are useful. Some of the SureFire options that have either 5 lumen or 1000 lumen settings sort of annoy me as I go from enough light to navigate my house (if my eyes are adjusted) or look under a desk to a light that can burn my retinas. This is where I sort of stray from the "tactical" light line of thinking because to me an EDC light should have utility for a number of situations, that to me is the point of EDC.

Currently I use a Streamlight ProTac 2L-X. I think the low mode is 40 lumens with the high mode being 500 lumens and you cycle by the tail cap. They're very affordable and I haven't been kind to mine and it's held up well, although it's a bit bulky when in the pants pocket of say dress slacks (depending on your line of work). I'll have to give the Fenix lights a look. For a knife I use a Zero Tolerance 0350ST. It is assisted open. It's not particularly light but it is solid and if you have medium hands or smaller you can likely use the opposite end as an impact weapon.

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Old November 13, 2018, 03:21 PM   #8
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Nice write-up.

While I have an assortment of glove-box and large jacket pocket lights that offer 350-1200 lumens, a while back I replaced my pari of 4Sevens Mini 123/ML-X pocket lights with a Fenix E15. Then, I upgraded to the rechargeable battery that offers 450 lumens on Turbo.

Why the small E15? Because at approx 2.5" in length and less .9" in diameter (at the widest, being the head) it easily fits in my pocket with other EDC "pocketable" items. While I usually have a "working" lockblade folder clipped to a pocket, I typically have 1-2 other knives vying for room in that pocket, like an old style (no metal liners and integral plastic clip) Spyderco Delica fully-serrated folder and a 2 or 3-blade penknife.

Back when I was still working in my LE career I've been in thousands of places during daylight hours where either the lights were off/inop when I entered, or they could've easily been turned off to make things difficult for me. I also needed a backup light on many occasions, during both daylight and night time working conditions. When you start to get enough gear hanging from your belt, having the option to have a handy-sized, small "pocketable" light source becomes an advantage to be appreciated.

Nowadays, however, we also have the option of getting more than 60-80 lumens from something that can be pressed into actual pocket service. That little E15 puts out more light than my older uniform light, and it's easier and faster to recharge. (Battery technology has advanced, as well.)

A word about spring-assisted folders, though. I have a bunch of them, and recently I had a tight jeans front pocket and some pressure while being seated cause the blade to partially open on a model that requires some good pressure against the blade stud in order to start it to open. Granted, it was a tip-up (only) design, so I couldn't choose tip-down carry, and it only allowed the clip to be on one side, so carrying it on my off-side (pocketed pistol in strong side pocket) meant I couldn't choose to position the opening direction of the blade to be against the rear of the pocket. It opened "forward". Damn.

I didn't realize the blade had popped open approx an inch until I reached into the pocket and found the needle sharp tip. No pain, initially (sharp point and edge), but only a moment later lots of blood down my jeans leg. Approx 2 stitches later (half an inch long and half an inch deep at the apex of the perforation) I decided that there was a reason some of the more expensive spring-assisted folders might offer a sliding tab at the tip to lock the blade from opening.

Anyway, I've reverted back to the manually opening folders for pocket clip duty, and that very nice spring-assisted model (AM-4, being a tribute to an older design of the late Al Mar) got its own Buffalo leather pocket slip sheath (sans clip, to fit).

Yes, it'll take a moment longer to remove it from the sheath, so it will become one of my "gentleman's" folders that reside in slip sheaths. I used to use leather slip sheaths for my trusty Gerber FSII (except when I briefly tried the Flicket widget), and the Kershaw Model 2040 that replaced it, back in the 70's.

One of my many manually opened folders will once again become the primary clip/carry equipment choices, backed up by a fully-serrated option (handy for aggressive cutting tasks) and one of my SAK's or a 2-3 blade normal stockman, trapper or penknife.

And the a small but powerful pocket light.

I've used my other 350 lumen & greater lights (which need large pockets or belt sheaths) for outdoor tasks (like when teaching patrol rifle classes under night time conditions), but the itty bitty E15 is still a potent option when pocket space is limited (and you can only use finger tips, or lips, versus your whole hand to hold the light).
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Old November 13, 2018, 05:15 PM   #9
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Here is my personal take on knife carry: I've carried a knife almost every day of my life since I was about 12 years old (back then, the teachers knew that I had a pocket knife and would ask me to fix the projector when it got stuck). However, my knife needs have never been for any kind of large or "tactical" kind of blade. My knife carry choice now is a decent sized Swiss Army knife. The most commonly used tool on that knife is actually the scissors followed by the toothpick.

I can't foresee a situation in which I need a knife as a weapon - therefore I choose to carry the knife that most resembles a tool (or in this case, a collection of tools).
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Old November 14, 2018, 01:42 AM   #10
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I've carried a folding knife of one kind or another since I was a kid. Like Doyle above, I've also considered it a tool as opposed to a weapon. Sure, it could be used as one in a pinch but there are a lot of drawbacks. If I was going to carry a knife defensively, I'd need a fixed blade.

Lights are one of the most valuable tools you can carry. Yes, cell phones, watches, and more can be used as lights. That doesn't mean that those things will be the best, most reliable, or most convenient sources of light; especially in an emergency. Technology has come a long way and it's just too easy to include a dedicated light in your EDC. There are lots of great single AAA flashlights out there for under twenty bucks. Most of them are small enough to throw in a pocket or attach to your key chain. Depending on what you normally carry, there are also some excellent pen lights that will take a pair of AAA cells.

For my own purposes, I don't care for cool white. Cool white LEDs can efficiently produce very bright light so they've taken center stage in the market. I prefer a warmer tint that is easier on my eyes and doesn't wash out the color in what I'm viewing. During the day, I keep a Klarus P20 in my shirt pocket alongside a couple of pens. It's a nice, diffused, neutral 5000K with high CRI. At night when I'm dressed more casually, I'll carry one of a few smaller lights in the 4000K range.
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Old November 14, 2018, 09:55 AM   #11
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While cell phones can be used for light, for me I avoid that use. If I am in a high stress situation, cell phone primary is for calling whoever I need. Next locating family. Third, photo or video if appropriate.

My primary use for a knife is to get things open. Boxes, doors, etc. In an emergency, maybe a chest, a seatbelt. About the last use I forsee for a knife is as a weapon, but that does not mean I carry one that would not be useful for such.
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Old November 14, 2018, 11:58 AM   #12
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post #3 says it fairly well.
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Old November 14, 2018, 04:16 PM   #13
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Knives and lights are tools. I try to choose one that fits the task. On me, or in my constant companion Maxpedition bag, i have several of each. Surefire Ti Titan, a Fenix PD35 with 18650 battery, and a Surefire Fury for illumination.
Benchmade Infidel OTF automatic and a Spyderco Para2, along with my Victorinox multi tool take care of cutting things. CZ 75D PCR for things rhat go bump in the night.
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Old November 14, 2018, 04:37 PM   #14
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Quote:
Benchmade Infidel OTF automatic and a Spyderco Para2, along with my Victorinox multi tool take care of cutting things. CZ 75D PCR for things rhat go bump in the night.
Nice. I thought I was the only one here who sort different types of knives for different tasks. I always have two cheap Home Depot-bought utility knives/case cutters on me in addition to the Schrade or S&W tactical spring-assisted. One for work: Opening cases, breaking down boxes, cutting shrink wrap and bundle straps. The other one is for opening food packets, since the first utility blade is pretty dirty from being used constantly in a warehouse setting and I am not going to use that one anywhere near food. The second blade is for when I want a meat/tofu jerky snack and these things are almost always wrapped in tough plastic vacuum seals. And other general-purpose cutting related to opening food packages on the go.

The tactical folder is kept discreetly and for emergencies only. It is not known by anybody around me, unlike the utility blades which are secured to my work rig with lanyards, but can be deployed when the need arises, very quickly. "The art of the shuriken is the art of throwing a short sword, and must remain a secret. It should only be used decisively". These are the words of Miyamoto Musashi. (Book of Five Rings, 1604) While I never thrown a knife before and doubt if I can even do something like that accurately especially in an emergency, there is still a lesson to be learned from that quote: Have a backup weapon hidden and available at all times. When something dire do happen, you have an edge up your sleeve. A most useful advantage for survival.
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Old November 14, 2018, 04:53 PM   #15
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While we're on the "EDC kit" topic ...

It's often amazing to me (in numerous other threads) that some folks who proclaim they never put their pants on without belting on a gun, even if remaining at home, will often state they don't see any reason to carry either a knife or a small light source. Of those 3 items, it's predominantly going to be the knife and the light that are not only more useful on a daily/nightly basis, but will likely be something that helps someone resolve many of life's frequent little difficulties.

Indispensable isn't an unwarranted description, and that's just talking about the easily pocketable gentleman's gear that can be carried on the person, and doesn't count the additional/backup odds & needs & gear that are easily carried in glove-boxes, consoles and trunks (for the bigger gear).

Of course, some folks could have all the handguns, knives, light sources, first aid kist and other gear they could stagger around with, and still be woefully ill-prepared (mentally and skills-wise) to use any of it.

"Better to have and not need ... " is something a lot of folks like to apply to their favorite handguns, but don't grasp the importance of applying it to the really important items that provide convenience, and potentially life-saving capabilities, when it comes to the things we have the freedom and luxury of owning and carrying on our persons.
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Old November 14, 2018, 05:50 PM   #16
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Originally Posted by MarkCO View Post
My primary use for a knife is to get things open. Boxes, doors, etc. In an emergency, maybe a chest, a seatbelt.
Primitive surgery?
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Old November 14, 2018, 05:53 PM   #17
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Originally Posted by fastbolt View Post
While we're on the "EDC kit" topic ...

It's often amazing to me (in numerous other threads) that some folks who proclaim they never put their pants on without belting on a gun, even if remaining at home, will often state they don't see any reason to carry either a knife or a small light source. Of those 3 items, it's predominantly going to be the knife and the light that are not only more useful on a daily/nightly basis, but will likely be something that helps someone resolve many of life's frequent little difficulties.

"Better to have and not need ... " is something a lot of folks like to apply to their favorite handguns, but don't grasp the importance of applying it to the really important items that provide convenience, and potentially life-saving capabilities, when it comes to the things we have the freedom and luxury of owning and carrying on our persons.

You're spot on.
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Old November 14, 2018, 05:56 PM   #18
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fastbolt with the Truth bomb.

My kid's school did a active shooter drill today. The kids watched a video, when I asked my boys what the teachers said (both of my boys are pretty well trained) they were not pleased, and neither was I. Sent an email to the Principle with several comments and questions. He was kind enough and referred me to the Superintendent, basically saying no to questions for which he should have been able to answer in the affirmative.

TCCC training by everyone who carries a knife or a gun...will save more lives than the guns will. 3 to 5 minutes is all there is...vast majority of the time, the response will be too late to save anyone.
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Old November 14, 2018, 05:58 PM   #19
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Primitive surgery?
If someone has a punctured lung or collapsed lung, it might be the only way to get the air out of the chest cavity. Hope I never have to, but "oh crap" won't work for me.
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Old November 14, 2018, 07:43 PM   #20
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Of course, some folks could have all the handguns, knives, light sources, first aid kist and other gear they could stagger around with, and still be woefully ill-prepared (mentally and skills-wise) to use any of it.
There are many names for those folks. Shooting Range Ninjas, mall ninjas, or Rambos. A lot of them tend to show up to the local gun range decked out in body armor, combat helmets and plate carriers. They spend more money on the accessories and optics draping off of their ARs than on their already overpriced rifles. Most of em' are not LE or tactical operators or even served in the military. But they are always splurging money on any latest gear they can find online, preparing and fantasizing about the day when "they" invade.

Meanwhile, these folks are the same ones who sit for prolonged periods of time in front of their computers playing video games, hour after hour of sedentary lifestyle, paying no regard to their physical and mental well-being whatsoever. Junk food, soda, beer, sugary snacks. Load after load of crap they stuff into their bodies without ever thinking about taking care of their health. I feel sorry for these people because what good is all that tacticool gear going to do for you when you run out of breath from even moderate activity? They spend every waking hour preparing for engagements with enemy invaders, toughened criminals or terrorists on rampage, but they either don't realize or don't want to realize that diabetes and heart disease are their real enemies and may already be starting to kill them slowly.

I have encountered and talked to a lot of these kinds of folks on the road. Those who think that the world and their whole lives revolve around their guns and preparation for imaginary insurgencies and social disasters. But at the same time they are woefully ignorant and unprepared for much more mundane and silent things that pose a far greater hazard to their lives than any imaginable war or catastrophe.
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Old November 15, 2018, 05:21 AM   #21
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In other words, everyone can benefit from training, regular practice, and a little effort paid towards a healthy lifestyle. If people who aren't totally devoted to all of those things still want to sink a small fortune into a market that produces things I like, or be on board to protect our rights at the election booth, I won't be too harsh on them. At the same time, there really are some situations in which just having the right tool and having a little experience with that tool just might save a life or two.

The reality is that someone who hits the range on a semi-regular basis and has a gun with them could be enough to stop a mass shooter. They may not be able to run a half mile through the woods and take out a gang of ninjas with their eyes closed. They might be fifty or more pounds overweight and have an ongoing love affair with fast food. They might not be the strongest opposition a bad guy ever faced. They're still a heck of a lot better than none.

So if you're one of those guys, consider some lessons, training, or just stepping it up with a few drills. Have a salad once in a while. Take the stairs, if you're able. In the meantime, thanks for having a gun, a knife, a flashlight, and whatever else might come in handy.
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Old November 15, 2018, 05:56 AM   #22
shafter
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Quote:
Meanwhile, these folks are the same ones who sit for prolonged periods of time in front of their computers playing video games, hour after hour of sedentary lifestyle, paying no regard to their physical and mental well-being whatsoever. Junk food, soda, beer, sugary snacks. Load after load of crap they stuff into their bodies without ever thinking about taking care of their health. I feel sorry for these people because what good is all that tacticool gear going to do for you when you run out of breath from even moderate activity? They spend every waking hour preparing for engagements with enemy invaders, toughened criminals or terrorists on rampage, but they either don't realize or don't want to realize that diabetes and heart disease are their real enemies and may already be starting to kill them slowly.

I have encountered and talked to a lot of these kinds of folks on the road. Those who think that the world and their whole lives revolve around their guns and preparation for imaginary insurgencies and social disasters. But at the same time they are woefully ignorant and unprepared for much more mundane and silent things that pose a far greater hazard to their lives than any imaginable war or catastrophe.
There's a lot of truth right here. It never made any sense to me for a person to spend hundreds if not thousands of dollars to focus on an armed encounter which is statistically highly unlikely to ever occur while totally ignoring the far greater theat to their survival.
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Old November 15, 2018, 12:08 PM   #23
shurshot
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Join Date: August 25, 2006
Posts: 1,058
Shafter; It makes sense... its known as Escapism. They seek out an alternative reality, however temporary, to escape the mundane and boring existence of everyday life. Much like going to the movies or reading a novel.

I agree though, junk food, soda and an overweight and flabby body doesn't bode well in a survival situation. They sit around, stuff their faces and type away! How the hell does one expect to strap on boots and "head for the hills", if they get tired out just going to the mall to buy their new video game? Same with some of the self proclaimed self defense experts on here and Youtube. Great at giving advice and dolling out criticism towards others pertaining to technical and legal aspects of self defense, but most can't bench press their own Bodyweight, or hike 5 miles (perhaps even 2???), without calling a rescue team. God forbid they actually had to go hands on with a bad guy. Yet, they try to educate others pertaining to the law and self defense. Pathetic, but humorous! You can judge a tree by the fruit it bears. That's what's nice about technology, you can always track down and figure out what kind of "tree" you are dealing with.
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Old November 15, 2018, 12:28 PM   #24
TunnelRat
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People using an internet forum to point out all the people who are overweight and out of shape because in large part of the time they spend on electronic devices. There's a degree of irony and maybe hypocrisy here.

I'm 5'9" 160 lb. I could lose some weight, and I could be more active too. That said, I seem to be doing okay and can work in my yard for hours or walk for the day without any difficulty. I am all this despite playing video games with my friends from college at night. Heck, sometimes I even have a beer too.

Like all things in life, moderation is key. Stereotyping people doesn't help anyone other than generally make the person using the stereotype feel better about himself. It's also what the anti-gunners love to do to us. But hey I'm just a "snowflake", so what do I know?

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Old November 15, 2018, 01:45 PM   #25
Rachen
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Join Date: May 10, 2006
Location: Weekend cowboy
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It's perfectly okay to use Internet forums and discussion boards. There is a difference from talking knowledge with like-minded folks on a forum and learning new things. We are not like those guys in South Korea who spend entire days and nights in Netcafes hammering away at World Of Warcraft until they are not even aware that they have vacated their bowels and bladders right into their seats. Of course, that is an extreme example, but people who overdo and overindulge are very capable of traveling down that same lane on the mental freeway.

Like TunnelRat mentioned, moderation is key. I have pizza and may even indulge in a bag of Doritos once in a while. I also drink beer and whiskey. I never overdo it though. I love to be on TFL because it is educational. For example in the last couple of days I learned about the Evans Repeating Rifle and the Herrin Massacre for the first time. For someone with such a love of history I was surprised I did not know of these. I always enjoy the discussions here, but at the same time, I am not neglecting my physical health by remaining sedentary for prolonged hours or abandoning my social life and cutting contacts with nearby friends by being glued to a computer. And I am sure none of us here are living that way either

Quote:
In other words, everyone can benefit from training, regular practice, and a little effort paid towards a healthy lifestyle. If people who aren't totally devoted to all of those things still want to sink a small fortune into a market that produces things I like, or be on board to protect our rights at the election booth, I won't be too harsh on them. At the same time, there really are some situations in which just having the right tool and having a little experience with that tool just might save a life or two.

The reality is that someone who hits the range on a semi-regular basis and has a gun with them could be enough to stop a mass shooter. They may not be able to run a half mile through the woods and take out a gang of ninjas with their eyes closed. They might be fifty or more pounds overweight and have an ongoing love affair with fast food. They might not be the strongest opposition a bad guy ever faced. They're still a heck of a lot better than none.

So if you're one of those guys, consider some lessons, training, or just stepping it up with a few drills. Have a salad once in a while. Take the stairs, if you're able. In the meantime, thanks for having a gun, a knife, a flashlight, and whatever else might come in handy.
Facts. Having access to a gun gives anyone a considerable edge in a violent situation. That is why I feel good and comfortable when I see law abiding folks of all kinds practicing with guns, going to the range and exercising responsible ownership and carrying.

Long time ago very shortly after Deng Xiaoping rolled back the Cultural Revolution and allowed free market enterprise, my Grand Uncle had been bedridden in his ranch house up in Hulunbeier, deathly sick from pneumonia, when a very large and very aggressive lynx prowled into the hamlet and menaced his baby grand-niece and her mother. Heard the yells for help come from the woman and the strained cries of the baby as they were held up in the wellhouse, with only a plank door and flimsy clapboard walls separating them from the snarling beast outside. He had been running a 104 fever, vomiting and near delirium, but still managed to stagger outside with a milsurp Zhongzheng-36 loaded with a full mag of 7.92x57. Racked the bolt, slammed it into battery and sent a single 180-grain FMJ through the skull of the big cat. Flipped it dead right on the spot and it ain't moved one twitch.

This is the same man who had told me once, "Son, you can be anything you want in life. Just don't be a burden on anyone". Since that day he had saved his grandniece and NIL he has had 6 major surgeries, had a tumor removed from his lungs, had parts of his lungs and stomach removed and had a spinal operation done. Much weaker today than he had been before, but he is still one tough son of a gun. I would feel sorry for anyone who would get into a gunfight with him, 'cause he is gonna smoke em' in a split second. Needs canes and crutches to walk but his shooting skills have not diminished one bit. For Christ's sake he actually uses his old Zhongzheng as a crutch when he's out checking the livestock.
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