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Old May 13, 2019, 08:20 PM   #51
Doyle
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Question #1: I was shooting my air rifle (that has a metal barrel) in the rain. I got worried about rusting so I wiped it dry, put a couple drops of Hoppes #9 on the barrel and spread it out with an old rag, will that be enough to prevent rusting?

Question #2: How can you tell if a scope is still okay to use? The old .22 I acquired came with a 4x15 "Revelation" scope from the 80s I think. Can I still use this scope or should I just go to walmart and pick up a cheap rimfire scope like a Tasco 4x15? I'm not really looking to spend too much on a scope (Unless I should invest in a better optic?) Please let me know.

Question #3: I know this is somewhat controversial, and it may just be my immature or kid side because I'm 17, but I often take my .22 rifle out at my house just to work the bolt (no dry fire) and look down the sights. I always thought I could gain better familiarity with the rifle. Should I only do this at the range or is it okay to do it at home?
1. There are better options than Hoppes #9 (as a protectant). Breakfree CLP is about as good as anything on the market and it is pretty cheap. It does double duty as cleaner and lubricant.
2. You can spend LOTS of money on scopes. Good glass is important but you don't have to buy the absolute best. Don't be tempted to cheapen out and buy the lowest either. I refuse to own ANYTHING Tasco. You can do much better. Don't buy BSA, Barska, NCStar or even Simmons (Simmons can be "iffy"). You can get a perfectly good Bushnell rimfire scope for about $70 or a Nikon for about $100. As to magnification, nothing over 9X. You'll probably use 4x 99% of the time.
3. Learn the 4 rules of firearm handling. First rule is ALWAYS treat every firearm as if it were loaded. Second rule is never point the barrel at anything you don't intend to shoot. With those two rules firmly in mind, what you are describing is quite reasonable. Sit in your room and practice shouldering and aiming. However, remember the old adage - "Practice does not make perfect. Perfect practice makes perfect". Meaning, if you practice something using bad form over and over again all you'll accomplish is to reinforce bad form.
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Old May 13, 2019, 08:46 PM   #52
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Hoppes 9 is not a rust preventative. It’s a powder solvent. Better to use something made to fight rust such as Breakfree CLP. A bottle of that will last a long time.

What kind of .22 rifle do you have?

I would take the rifle out and shoot some targets with it. Make sure the scope is properly zeroed and make sure it stays there. You may have to adjust the zero. I would zero for 50 yd to start. You can always change it later.
If the scope works well and you can see a good image through it, there’s no sense in replacing it simply because it’s older than you are. Sometimes older stuff is better quality than modern items.

Buying cheap optics or cheap firearms is false economy because you won’t be satisfied later and will feel the need to replace it so it will be money wasted. Better to do a bit of research on the items and put off buying until you can afford something you won’t be dissatisfied with later. You’ll be money ahead doing that.

Working a bolt is pretty simple exercise and doesn’t require a whole lot of practice. In my opinion, you would be better off taking it out in the desert or to the range for actual live fire practice. .22 ammo is cheap.
When you practice, you are conditioning your brain to recognize a specific sight picture that produces the desired result when you pull the trigger. In time, it will become an automatic reflex. Take your time and don’t try to rush. Speed will come automatically as your brain becomes conditioned.
Use a stable rest and a small bullseye. The smaller your target, the more precise your shooting will be. You can make your own targets with a felt pen.

Try different brands of ammo until you find which brand your rifle shoots best. Different brands will normally produce different results and different points of impact.
In my .22 rifles, I’ve found that CCI Blazer and CCI Standard Velocity is most consistent ammo. Blazer is less expensive so I would try it first.
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Old May 13, 2019, 09:04 PM   #53
big al hunter
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Quote:
Question #1: I was shooting my air rifle (that has a metal barrel) in the rain. I got worried about rusting so I wiped it dry, put a couple drops of Hoppes #9 on the barrel and spread it out with an old rag, will that be enough to prevent rusting?

Question #2: How can you tell if a scope is still okay to use? The old .22 I acquired came with a 4x15 "Revelation" scope from the 80s I think. Can I still use this scope or should I just go to walmart and pick up a cheap rimfire scope like a Tasco 4x15? I'm not really looking to spend too much on a scope (Unless I should invest in a better optic?) Please let me know.

Question #3: I know this is somewhat controversial, and it may just be my immature or kid side because I'm 17, but I often take my .22 rifle out at my house just to work the bolt (no dry fire) and look down the sights. I always thought I could gain better familiarity with the rifle. Should I only do this at the range or is it okay to do it at home?
1. Hoppes is ok. CLP works. Oil is best. Light gun oil is easy to apply and remove when needed.

2. If you can see through the old scope and you can hit the target with decent groups, then there is no reason to replace it. If you can't see the target, or if groups are not good and you have determined it is not the rifle or the shooter, then a new scope is in order. As mentioned above, avoid the cheap ones. You may not find anything better than what you have at Walmart.

3. The vast majority of firearms incidents around here occur in the home. People become complacent and get loose on the firearm handling safety rules. If you practice anything at home, triple check for no ammunition in the gun. Then check again. Don't have ammunition in the same room when practicing, it stops inadvertently loading due to curiosity. And check it again for not being loaded any time you put it down and pick it up. Don't point it at walls that could have someone on the other side, or another house. And keep your booger hook off the bang switch.
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Old May 13, 2019, 10:05 PM   #54
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Thank you all for your responses. I will look into some options for scopes (Probably just a Barska 4x32, I'll figure it out), and will debate with myself whether I can have my firearm out in my house safely.

Back to hunting!

I don't understand the point of camo if people just wear blazing orange anyways. I considered putting on an old ghillie suit I have but then my dad's buddy gave me an old camo jacket he had. Fits well! Good pockets for ammo, rangefinder/binocs, map and compass.
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Old May 13, 2019, 10:11 PM   #55
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I don't understand the point of camo if people just wear blazing orange anyways.
If people are wearing orange, it is normally because it is the law.
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Old May 13, 2019, 10:47 PM   #56
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Don’t waste your money on Barska, BSA or the others that were mentioned. The suggestion of Bushnell or Nikon was good advice. Personally, I prefer Nikon.
I wouldn’t buy anything until I was certain the scope you have now is no good.

Nothing wrong with wearing camo here in AZ.
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Old May 13, 2019, 11:00 PM   #57
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Jack Ryan has it right. You wear camo to keep the animals from seeing you. You wear blaze orange so that other hunters will see you. Normally, the two are not mutually exclusive as orange is generally only required (or commonly used) where it is needed and doesn't interfere with the hunt. Deer are pretty much color blind. As long as the orange you are wearing doesn't fluoresce in UV light, deer will see it as grey. Squirrel hunters will wear orange when hunting in a group because you aren't trying to hide from the squirrel in that case. When squirrel hunting alone, you are trying to sneak up on them so hunters will wear camo. Quail and pheasant hunters will wear orange frequently - you are wanting the birds to flush up in front of you so wearing orange doesn't hurt. Turkey and dove hunters never wear orange because both have very keen sight.
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Old May 14, 2019, 10:50 AM   #58
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Oh okay. Yeah, I was watching some Turkey hunting videos last night. They wear a lot of camo. I looked into a bushnell banner 1.5-4x32 scope and I think I'll buy it soon (Bad reviews always freak me out but there were only a couple).
The hunter safety course touched on it a little bit but, on public/state land how do people avoid cross fire. If two hunters or recreational shooters didn't know the other person was there?
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Old May 14, 2019, 11:19 AM   #59
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My thoughts:

I’ve found a 2-7 power scope to be much more versatile on a rimfire, particularly if you plan to do any precision shooting.

Check parallax. Parallax on rimfire scopes is generally set for 50 yd while big game scopes are normally set for 100 yd.

A scope with an adjustable objective will work for both.
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Old May 14, 2019, 11:39 AM   #60
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There's a leupold 2-7 that does look very appealing, and I'm sure the it would be a very good investment. I'll consider it. This is just me, but with all the cheap 4x15's that I have, all I really want is a wider lense, and windage/elevation knobs that click into place and hold zero.
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Old May 14, 2019, 11:48 AM   #61
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If two hunters or recreational shooters didn't know the other person was there?
Earlier, I mentioned the 4 absolute rules of firearms handling. This is covered in Rule 4 - Know your target AND what is behind the target. Unlike in the movies, real bullets don't just stop when they hit flesh. More often than not, they exit the other side and can continue to do damage until they are totally spent. That is why you must make absolutely certain you understand what could potentially get hit after you pull the trigger.
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Old May 14, 2019, 02:46 PM   #62
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The Leupold 2-7 is an excellent choice. I have a couple and I really like them. That would be my first choice for general use rimfire scope.
I also have a Nikon 2-7x32 which is another excellent scope but a bit larger than the Leupold.
If you would to try them before you buy one and feel like taking a drive . . . . . . . .
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Old May 15, 2019, 07:44 AM   #63
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.The hunter safety course touched on it a little bit but, on public/state land how do people avoid cross fire. If two hunters or recreational shooters didn't know the other person was there?
This is why we wear hunter orange. It makes it easier to be seen at any distance. Also why we use binoculars to view game at great distance before shooting. Take an extra few seconds to scan the area behind the target looking for things you don't want to shoot.
Quote:
.all I really want is a wider lense, and windage/elevation knobs that click into place and hold zero.
The Leopold is a nice scope. For less $ and a great warranty look at Vortex. The Crossfire line of scopes is budget minded and has decent features. You should look through the scopes you are thinking about getting, if possible. Go to a local sporting goods store and spend some time looking at the different features and don't buy one just to have it. Make sure you really like it first.
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Old May 15, 2019, 02:42 PM   #64
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Wear it !!

Quote:
You wear camo to keep the animals from seeing you.
In practice, in my Squirrel woods, the Squirrels always look forward to my latest Camo attire of the season. I play games with them but they always know I'm there. ....

Turkeys are dumb and any patterns works but they will still bust you. ….

Deer; Have to wear blaze-orange and I see where Illinois has approved Victoria's Secret …. PINK

Be Safe !!!
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Old May 15, 2019, 08:52 PM   #65
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As soon as I can, I'm gonna get my dad to go with me to a gun store (I'm not 18 yet) I'm sure once I'm there I can take a better look at a few scopes and maybe a centerfire rifle. For now, I'm gonna write down a few options so that I have an idea of what I'm looking for.
I'm a little confused as to how land is managed. If I'm hunting on state land, are there no residences at all? I often see little farm houses or barns even on places designated as "state" land. Could someone clarify or is it state by state?
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Old May 15, 2019, 09:36 PM   #66
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Try to find a local office of this out fit to help you get the maps you need.
https://www.blm.gov/maps

Short of that, go to your county courthouse and find out where to get a county platt book of the area you want to hunt. That book will show you REAL and ACCURATE land ownership and property lines. If it is state land it will say the property as property of the state of Arizona. If it is federal land it will say property of USA.

At least around here, you can drive a mile down a road and pass from public ground on the right to private ground on the left, switch and the public on both sides and back to private ground on every corner at the next cross roads and never know the real owner ship of any of it no matter how hard you were looking or trying.

Unless you have the golden key to knowledge of ownership, a county platt book and list of land owners.

In our state, Indiana, you can find that same information on the internet if you know where to look and how to use it.

http://39dn.com/

I believe it is a federal requirement that every state get their information available on line like that, BUT not all states have equally progressed in achieving it and they all have their own way and their own web page for providing it. No two states do it the same as far as I know.
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Old May 15, 2019, 10:38 PM   #67
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Most public land whether BLM, national forest or state land is divided by fences into individual leases. Often a rancher will own small amounts of acreage in the lease. Most will not. Ranchers will improve their lease often with buildings but most often with the infrastructure to deliver water. Believe it or not there is still a land use atlas published. On paper! It will give you a general idea of who owns the land. From there you have to go to the map store. I know there are few in Phoenix and I’d figure there is at least 1 in Tucson. BLM and national forest maps are the key. In general you need a permit to use state land. The exception is a hunting license is your permit to hunt. It not target shoot.
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Old May 16, 2019, 07:26 AM   #68
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All depends on the state in question. Out West, most states have huge tracts of land managed either by the BLM or the NFS. These lands are open, public land. Many times ranchers will have leased grazing rights; some timber companies will have harvesting rights, etc. In NV, you also have gold mining and military usage to contend with. Most areas are available for hiking, hunting, fishing, camping, etc.
Back East things may be different as lands may have been settled before state areas were designated as in NY's Adirondack State Park.
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Old May 17, 2019, 08:32 PM   #69
big al hunter
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. Deer; Have to wear blaze-orange and I see where Illinois has approved Victoria's Secret …. PINK
Washington just made florescent pink legal as well. IIRC 8 or 9 states allow pink. Elk will also require orange or pink in most areas for modern firearms seasons.
Quote:
.I'm a little confused as to how land is managed. If I'm hunting on state land, are there no residences at all? I often see little farm houses or barns even on places designated as "state" land. Could someone clarify or is it state by state?
Mostly state by state. Next time you are at the gun store or where you get hunting license look for game management area maps. Some maps are available with hunting units and owner information. There is also an app that has several states game/hunting areas in a GPS with all kinds of details. Property owner contact information, exact boundaries, animals you can hunt in the area and a few other things I can't remember now. Might be called HuntX or something like that. Didn't tickle my fancy.

Also look at the written game regulations. Could be online, should be in hard copy where you buy hunting licenses. The boundaries of the game management areas will be described in detail. As will local rules for hunting and restrictions that must be followed.
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Old Yesterday, 12:23 PM   #70
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Okay, I've found information like that now, thank you.
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