The Firing Line Forums

Go Back   The Firing Line Forums > The Skunkworks > The Smithy

Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread
Old May 12, 2019, 11:57 PM   #1
Ignition Override
Senior Member
 
Join Date: February 18, 2008
Location: About 20 nm from the Big Muddy
Posts: 2,398
Why must paint be Sprayed on a gun?

Does a brush apply it too thickly or unevenly? Being retired, time is not an issue.

Quite frankly, this is not intended to be a beauty queen, repeat, not, just to improve the black paint on an Egyptian Maadi AK's outer receiver, forward gas tube area and barrel, which are faded and scratched. That's all.

Let me emphasize that it does not need to qualify for the Louvre or Dresden's Zwinger (art) Museum.
Ignition Override is offline  
Old May 13, 2019, 12:01 AM   #2
Bill DeShivs
Senior Member
 
Join Date: April 7, 2006
Posts: 9,909
Yes, it does.
You may be able to do an adequate touchup job with a brush, though.
__________________
Bill DeShivs, Master Cutler
www.billdeshivs.com
Bill DeShivs is offline  
Old May 13, 2019, 01:00 AM   #3
JohnKSa
Staff
 
Join Date: February 12, 2001
Location: DFW Area
Posts: 22,232
I recommend that you get a piece of scrap sheet metal and try painting it using both methods. If you're happy with the results you get with the brush, then do it on the gun. Keep in mind that the next owner may have different standards.
__________________
Do you know about the TEXAS State Rifle Association?
JohnKSa is offline  
Old May 13, 2019, 04:36 AM   #4
Hawg
Senior Member
 
Join Date: September 8, 2007
Location: Mississippi
Posts: 14,978
Spraying will give a smoother finish.
Hawg is offline  
Old May 13, 2019, 06:44 AM   #5
Ricklin
Senior Member
 
Join Date: February 22, 2008
Location: SW Washington state
Posts: 1,493
Spray it

No question, spray it. If you must Preval makes a sprayer that consists of a glass jar and a can of propellant. They work well if you don't have compressed air.
An airbrush setup is the ticket for guns.
__________________
ricklin
Freedom is not free
Ricklin is offline  
Old May 13, 2019, 07:45 AM   #6
Unclenick
Staff
 
Join Date: March 4, 2005
Location: Ohio
Posts: 15,991
I would say it depends on the surrounding original finish. With a smooth finish, spraying and blending or, generally best, refinishing the whole thing is the only way to get a result that isn't picked up by the eye as some degree of finish irregularity. But with a scratch on a textured or pebbled finish, you can sometimes get better blending using the old photographer's touch-up method of dotting the paint onto the scratch with the tip of a very fine, sharp brush.
__________________
Gunsite Orange Hat Family Member
CMP Certified GSM Master Instructor
NRA Certified Rifle Instructor
NRA Benefactor Member and Golden Eagle
Unclenick is online now  
Old May 13, 2019, 10:30 AM   #7
std7mag
Senior Member
 
Join Date: June 23, 2013
Location: Central Taxylvania..
Posts: 2,529
Usually paint using a brush is a little thicker in consistancy that spray.
Helps the paint hold onto the brush. So when applying you will get thick spots.
Spraying requires the paint to be thinner so it atomizes. While spraying is actually shooting very fine droplets at the material, being thinner allows it to flow and settle to a smoother more uniform finish.

One thing i've had great success with in touching up is to mix paint as for spraying, and use a small piece of sponge to dab it in. Being thin like for spraying allow the paint to flow and settle.
__________________
This country was founded on two beliefs.
And I'm pretty sure pork rinds was one of them!
std7mag is offline  
Old May 13, 2019, 11:00 AM   #8
Ignition Override
Senior Member
 
Join Date: February 18, 2008
Location: About 20 nm from the Big Muddy
Posts: 2,398
Roger that. Thanks.
Ignition Override is offline  
Old May 14, 2019, 01:11 PM   #9
F. Guffey
Senior Member
 
Join Date: July 18, 2008
Posts: 6,942
And then there is the primer coat, that is something like conditioning the metal to accept the paint. After that I would ask about a leveling agent. I found a company in northers/central Ohio that makes the best paint, I believe it has to do with their leveler.

F. Guffey
F. Guffey is online now  
Old May 14, 2019, 05:14 PM   #10
4V50 Gary
Staff
 
Join Date: November 2, 1998
Location: Colorado
Posts: 20,348
Anyone who built a model airplane, ship, car, tank, knows that brushing paint on is much more uneven than spraying. It simply looks better sprayed than brushed.
__________________
Vigilantibus et non dormientibus jura subveniunt. Molon Labe!
4V50 Gary is offline  
Old May 14, 2019, 06:15 PM   #11
Dfariswheel
Senior Member
 
Join Date: May 4, 2001
Posts: 7,180
You can buy a cheap air brush in any hobby shop or by mail from companies like Harbor Freight.

You can buy cans of propellant, run it with an air compressor, or run it off a spare tire.
the compressor or tire you need a pressure gauge so you don't blow up the air brush.
Put the can of propellant in a pan of hot water to keep the pressure good.

I found that Rust-oleum in flat black doesn't work well because as you handle the metal the flat finish wears to a satin blotchy look where it's been handled.
Gloss black is too shiny and satin black is still a little too shiny, so I mixed flat black with a little satin black or gloss black to get just the level I wanted.
This looks flat black but has just enough gloss or satin to prevent the blotching.

I'd bake it in an oven at 300 degrees for one hour with everything off the gun that might be damaged by heat.
You can also use Auto engine block paints which are very durable and heat proof.

I'd wait until my wife was out for the day to do the painting and baking. Then I'd open the doors and windows to try to air it out because the baking paint makes a strong, bad smell.

She'd come home and immediately ask what that smell was.
Since lying gets you in even deeper I'd tell her the truth.
Her response was...
"You did WHAT with MY stove"??????

This sounded remarkably like a dull chain saw blade hitting a rusty tree spike.
Dfariswheel is offline  
Old May 14, 2019, 07:43 PM   #12
4V50 Gary
Staff
 
Join Date: November 2, 1998
Location: Colorado
Posts: 20,348
Dfariswheel brings up a good point. Never bake your stuff in the oven at home. Buy a dedicated toaster oven and use that.
__________________
Vigilantibus et non dormientibus jura subveniunt. Molon Labe!
4V50 Gary is offline  
Old May 14, 2019, 10:38 PM   #13
LineStretcher
Senior Member
 
Join Date: June 14, 2018
Posts: 590
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ignition Override View Post
Does a brush apply it too thickly or unevenly? Being retired, time is not an issue.

Quite frankly, this is not intended to be a beauty queen, repeat, not, just to improve the black paint on an Egyptian Maadi AK's outer receiver, forward gas tube area and barrel, which are faded and scratched. That's all.

Let me emphasize that it does not need to qualify for the Louvre or Dresden's Zwinger (art) Museum.
There is no technical reason that you can't brush on your paint. If it wears off, paint it again.
LineStretcher is offline  
Old May 14, 2019, 10:42 PM   #14
LineStretcher
Senior Member
 
Join Date: June 14, 2018
Posts: 590
Baking on paint was common with older paints but with today's paint's there is no need. In fact, the only thing you do is skin the paint over so it can't fully gas off and cure. Leave it alone for 48 hours and it will be as hard as it will ever get.
LineStretcher is offline  
Old May 15, 2019, 04:20 PM   #15
4V50 Gary
Staff
 
Join Date: November 2, 1998
Location: Colorado
Posts: 20,348
Some paints need baking: Cerakote, GunCoat and a few others. Follow the manufacturer's instruction (and don't bake it in the wife's oven).
__________________
Vigilantibus et non dormientibus jura subveniunt. Molon Labe!
4V50 Gary is offline  
Old May 17, 2019, 07:08 PM   #16
Dfariswheel
Senior Member
 
Join Date: May 4, 2001
Posts: 7,180
Some modern paints not only don't need baking, some CAN'T be baked.

As example a couple of years ago I need a fast finish on a piece of equipment so I bought Rust-oleum Professional Spray Paint and tried to bake it.
It actually melted and made a mess.

The old oil-based Rust-oleum that you can buy in the small cans at hardware and Walmart stores can be baked.

This is not only a fast way to apply a durable finish, the baking seems to make it harder and more durable then air drying.
You can brush or spray on a coat, give it 30 minutes or do for some of the volatilize to out-gas and then bake it for one hour at 300 degrees for gun parts.

Always remove all springs before coating and baking.
Dfariswheel is offline  
Reply

Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off

Forum Jump


All times are GMT -5. The time now is 12:25 PM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.7
Copyright ©2000 - 2019, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.
This site and contents, including all posts, Copyright © 1998-2018 S.W.A.T. Magazine
Copyright Complaints: Please direct DMCA Takedown Notices to the registered agent: thefiringline.com
Contact Us
Page generated in 0.09196 seconds with 9 queries