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Old May 30, 2017, 04:05 PM   #51
dgludwig
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Shootist I am curious why you have to release the striker to store your .22 pistols. The handling practices don't change and the amount of tension on the partially or fully cocked striker spring will not effect function based on my study and experience.
See HK's response to this issue in post no.10-whether you buy into their rationale or not, it does pose legitimate questions.
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Old May 30, 2017, 04:45 PM   #52
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Thanks dgludwig. I don't necessarily agree, but I won't argue with anyone about it.
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Old May 30, 2017, 05:45 PM   #53
ShootistPRS
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Kmac,
I know it won't hurt the spring or gun to leave it in a cocked position I just like to have it in a rest state.

tipoc,
The guns are a first generation Ruger (before mark 1) and a High Standard M101. i have an accessory second barrel for the M101 that is 24" long. I never got around to making a rifle stock for it but I might someday.
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Old May 30, 2017, 06:02 PM   #54
dgludwig
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I know it won't hurt the spring or gun to leave it in a cocked position I just like to have it in a rest state.
If the spring isn't "hurt" by being in the cocked state, I guess I'm just curious as to why you prefer to keep it in a "rest state" and am interested as to why you prefer that configuration, given your already stated predilection to not have to dry-fire a gun before storing it:

Quote:
It is possible for the hammer to slip and fire the gun as it is lowered so I am extremely careful and aware when I lower the hammer. I could leave the hammer cocked and use the safety but there again you are relying on a mechanical device that can wear and fail. Having carried revolvers my whole life I would have to relearn my draw to release the safety before I got it on target. It is easier for me to just pull the trigger like I do with my revolver.
I do own a couple of striker fired guns - in 22LR - and I hate that I have to fire them on an empty chamber to store the gun. It is hard on the firing pin and on the rear of the chamber.
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Old May 30, 2017, 06:49 PM   #55
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dgludwig asked
If the spring isn't "hurt" by being in the cocked state, I guess I'm just curious as to why you prefer to keep it in a "rest state" and am interested as to why you prefer that configuration, given your already stated predilection to not have to dry-fire a gun before storing it:
It is a combination of the way I was taught and plain old personal preference. I don't store any of my guns with the mainspring compressed. I do store magazines in a loaded condition. Go figure.
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Old May 30, 2017, 07:48 PM   #56
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ShootistPRS,

Quote:
The guns are a first generation Ruger (before mark 1) and a High Standard M101.
Nice guns. But as I recall the Duramatic is striker fired and the Ruger has an internal hammer. Both good pieces. HS made very good 22s. I've never owned an HS mostly cuz I've worried about spare parts, or my perceived lack of them..

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Old May 31, 2017, 08:11 AM   #57
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I'm a fan of hammer fired guns, with decockers. The reason is one that I don't hear discussed often, but it's very important to me.

After decocking the gun, the user can place their thumb on the lowered hammer while reholstering. With the thumb on the hammer, the hammer is prevented from moving rearward, even if the trigger were inadvertently pulled.

To me, this is perfect solution. In my mind, the most dangerous time for the user of a firearm is when unholstering and reholstering. The long pull of a DA/SA gun is a good preventative when unholstering, and a thumb on the hammer is a good safety measure when reholstering.

Works for me.
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Old May 31, 2017, 02:40 PM   #58
dgludwig
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After decocking the gun, the user can place their thumb on the lowered hammer while reholstering. With the thumb on the hammer, the hammer is prevented from moving rearward, even if the trigger were inadvertently pulled.

To me, this is perfect solution. In my mind, the most dangerous time for the user of a firearm is when unholstering and reholstering. The long pull of a DA/SA gun is a good preventative when unholstering, and a thumb on the hammer is a good safety measure when reholstering.

Works for me.
Works for me too.
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Old June 1, 2017, 04:27 PM   #59
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Quote:
Originally Posted by jackstrawIII:
I'm a fan of hammer fired guns, with decockers. The reason is one that I don't hear discussed often, but it's very important to me.

After decocking the gun, the user can place their thumb on the lowered hammer while reholstering. With the thumb on the hammer, the hammer is prevented from moving rearward, even if the trigger were inadvertently pulled.

To me, this is perfect solution. In my mind, the most dangerous time for the user of a firearm is when unholstering and reholstering. The long pull of a DA/SA gun is a good preventative when unholstering, and a thumb on the hammer is a good safety measure when reholstering.

Works for me.
Goes double for me too, I just got an HK P2000 .40S&W V2 LEM trigger variant, and I'm thinking this may well be one of the best possible carry gun setups, with the LEM, every trigger pull is the same, and that trigger won't move if I thumb-cover the backplane of the slide when I (re)holster it.
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Old June 11, 2017, 03:36 PM   #60
cluznar
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The only two pistols I own are both hammer fired, so I guess I like hammer fired best. Both of them are dependable and accurate.
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Old June 11, 2017, 04:19 PM   #61
James K
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The Borchardt (1893) is striker fired. The Mauser "Broomhandle" (1896) is hammer fired. So the "discussion" has been going on a while. And will continue.

Jim
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