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Old September 24, 2021, 03:48 PM   #1
Right to bear arms
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Did I make a mistake on my pre 64 model 70?

I had a 1951 Winchester model 70 in .270. It shot great but the stock was horrible. So I hired an excellent gunsmith to refinish the stock. I absolutely love it now, but others say I ruined the collector value. Since I only paid $600 for the gun and was tired of looked at the damaged stock I had it refinished anyway. The old girl is ready for another 70 years of hunting
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Old September 24, 2021, 04:29 PM   #2
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Regardless of what may or may not determine value, if you're happy that's what counts.
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Old September 24, 2021, 05:10 PM   #3
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I wasn't aware that dents and scratches added to a rifle's stock value. Restoration does preserve value IMO. I would have done the same thing.
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Old September 24, 2021, 05:28 PM   #4
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Quote:
Originally Posted by stagpanther View Post
I wasn't aware that dents and scratches added to a rifle's stock value. Restoration does preserve value IMO. I would have done the same thing.
That would be a better question for an actual collector of pre-64 Winchester model 70's.

https://www.24hourcampfire.com/ubbth...pics/9728576/1

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Old September 24, 2021, 06:57 PM   #5
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Short of $25,000 engraved/gold inlaid museum pieces -- weapons are tools.
They and their owners are happiest when taken care of where it counts....
... functionally.
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Old September 24, 2021, 08:05 PM   #6
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If that's the finished product pictured, you didn't hurt the value. Not all pre-64 Winchester M70 are collector rifles. Even refinished I think you could double your money if you wished to sell it.
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Old September 24, 2021, 08:18 PM   #7
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A standard sporter pre-64 made after WW-2 in a common cartridge like 270 or 30-06 is just another 60-70 year old rifle with no "real" collector value. Most of them made prior to the war have some value and even post-war rifles in unusual configurations or oddball cartridges where only a handful were made are valuable.

Around $600-$700 is a fair price for a common rifle like yours. Judging from the photo it appears to be well done and I think it improves the gun. Shoot it, hunt with it and enjoy it.
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Old September 24, 2021, 10:11 PM   #8
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We all know the old saying about everybody having opinions and other commonalities....the rifle looks great. Enjoy it.
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Old September 24, 2021, 10:25 PM   #9
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It looks great. I think you made the right choice, besides it's your gun and you get to do what you want with it.
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Old September 25, 2021, 06:38 AM   #10
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From the photo it looks to me like the person who did the job knew what the classic rifle was supposed to look like.
It seems a good,faithful job.
From your story,we are not talking about a rifle that started out in pristine 99% condition.
Your critics seem to be forgetting condition is everything.
If the rifle was in "fair" condition, what "collector" price will you get?
Its different if this is "THE" rifle Billie Dixon fired at Adobe Walls Then the original dirt might be worth something.

Had the person who did the work sanded the wood lower than the steel, sanded the bluing off the steel.rounded the corners and washed out the lines,messed up the checkering,then covered it with a gaudy 1/8 inch thick layer of shiny clear bar top finish, and cut some add-on custom white line spacer from a bleach bottle for the buttplate.....

Well....Sometimes,when I can't say something nice,I don't say anything much.
A hunting rifle is kind of personal. How hard is it to just say "Nice rifle! " and let it be?
Beware the guy who just has to run down another person's gun. They have some kind of ego sickness that is far worse than the gun.
You don't need their approval. I think I can call them "sphincters" without breaking forum rules.

Outfits like the Montana Rifle Company tried real hard to duplicate the Pre-64 M-70. They cost a lot for just a barreled action. They went belly up.

You have a fine,classic rifle. Enjoy it the rest of your life then pass it on.

Tell the sphincters " Its the buyer with his wallet out that determines resale. That only matters if I'm selling. Its my hunting rifle. I enjoy it. Its not for sale."
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Old September 25, 2021, 07:17 AM   #11
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GoodNESS, I thought I was going to be the odd duckling out to tell you to tell the detractors to buzz off…. Looks like that is the consensus around here, and a good one at that.

I highly agree with the resale market is determined by what the buyer will bear. And if you are going to sell it. There will ALWAYS be tough guy arm chair warriors that sit behind a computer screen and preach the gospel of the ivory tower. Words, man. Words.

Mehavey said it perfectly, guns are tools. They were designed as such. While I do feel that some are just gorgeous relics that shouldn’t be diddled with, a hunting rifle is just that, for trudging through the woods, getting a little scratched and dinged up on the stock. Taking an animal for dinner. Or sport, if you are a donor.

I had originally looked at a pre-64 Winchester as the base of my current build. Just trying to find stocks and the like for them was a bit of trouble. For me, at least.

Very nice rifle. I hope it serves you well for years and years to come, and then you can pass it on. Action, if well maintained, should outlast even your grandkids. Barrels can (and will need to) be replaced from time to time, but it should serve you well. Don’t let the sphincters get under your skin.
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Old September 25, 2021, 08:50 AM   #12
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Some guns more than just a tool. Much more. Some represent cherished memories.
Beautiful gun. So happy to see you keep it. The monetary gratification of a sale in would IMO, be short lived.

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Old September 25, 2021, 08:53 AM   #13
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Yes, I am very happy with the stock refinishing. The gentleman(probably the best gunsmith in East Tn) only charged me $100 to totally refinish the wood and checkering. My problem is that I am 66 years old and have a limited amount of hunting left. My daughters married millennials that can spell the word gun and don't have any interest in fine firearms. I love the feel of the old winchester. What other 70 year old thing can bring such pleasure?
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Old September 25, 2021, 03:12 PM   #14
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What other 70 year old thing can bring such pleasure?
Hmmm. Moderators, be afraid, be very afraid.
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Old September 26, 2021, 08:23 AM   #15
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Wow, 100 bucks is a great deal for all that work. Looks fantastic and enjoy it in good health.
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Old September 26, 2021, 10:47 AM   #16
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I’d say that was $100.00 well spent.
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Old September 26, 2021, 11:21 AM   #17
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Having work done to an older gun "destroying the collector value" is a stock phrase used by people who mostly aren't collectors, and are only parroting something they heard or read.

"Collector value" depends on what the collector WANTS. And it assumes that the piece has "collector value" the way it is, and that value will be reduced if it is changed. If the collector is looking for a pristine, "as new" or "as originally issued" condition gun, then a used one with some wear is worth less to them. If the collector is a shooter who is looking for a decent example of the type, then a professionally refinished gun has value to them.

There is collector value, and then there is market value to shooters, and last but certainly not least, there is what value the gun has to you.

All three can be widely different.

I don't think you made a mistake at all. And. I think the people telling you that you "ruined the collector value" are barking idiots.
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Old September 27, 2021, 07:51 PM   #18
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Well, i can think of..

VH grade Parker from 1916, getting back from DEl Greco's, so it can go forward to someone in the family,

Grandad's 1894 Remington SxS, that got passed by another smith for using 2-1/2" shells.

Using a 1957 Marlin M57 LEVERMATIC .22 for squirrels, swathing out with the 1976 M90 O/U in 16ga.

Deer hunting this November with my 1968 M70, that the barrel was swapped with a replacement barrel in 7mmMag, or 1971 M70 in 308.

Their yours, use em, afterwards you will have diminshed interest of what others think!
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Old September 28, 2021, 09:48 AM   #19
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If it was dinged up to the point where you didn't like looking at it then there wasn't much collectors value left anyways. Now you have a nice looking classic that you can enjoy. I'd say you made the right call.
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Old September 28, 2021, 09:51 AM   #20
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You did the right thing. Don't worry about it.

Shoot some deer. Eat them. Be happy.
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Old September 28, 2021, 12:00 PM   #21
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I don't see a problem !!!

Quote:
I absolutely love it now, but others say I ruined the collector value.
On this one and by my measure, you did the right thing and the end results, speaks for itself. It's your rifle, call and judgement. ....

Be Safe !!!
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Old September 28, 2021, 12:48 PM   #22
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Send that gunsmith all the work you can. He didn't ruin your collector value, he enhanced a rifle you can carry with pride for a shockingly low price.

That fellow is not going to stay in business unless you tell all your friends what a good craftsman he is. I need such a fellow in my area, but they have all gone out of business.
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Old October 14, 2021, 04:52 PM   #23
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Enjoy that good looking rifle ... let your descendants worry about the resale value ...
... I wouldn't give "resale value" a second thought !
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Old October 14, 2021, 07:04 PM   #24
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There are plenty of guys that would readily pay $1,000 for that rifle, without the scope, maybe even more. But as it has already been mentioned, you will get far more joy out of using it than you will will ever get out of selling it.
In my opinion, it is the gold-standard of bolt-action rifles. Thanks for sharing your joy.
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