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Old September 10, 2021, 07:49 AM   #1
divil
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Changing from nonimmigrant alien to immigrant

Here's one for the sharp legal minds of TFL!

I came to the US as a nonimmigrant, with a visa. Now, it's well known that nonimmigrants are generally not allowed to have guns, unless they have a hunting license:


Quote:
An alien legally in the U.S. is not prohibited from purchasing firearms unless the alien is admitted into the U.S. under a nonimmigrant visa and does not meet one of the exceptions as provided in 18 U.S.C. 922(y)(2), such as possession of a valid hunting license or permit.

[18 U.S.C. 922 (d)(5), (g)(5) and (y)(2); 27 CFR 478.11 and 478.32(a)(5) ]
So I've always made sure that I had a valid hunting license as long as I've had guns or ammunition. So far so good.

But I've now had the good fortune to become a permanent resident (yay!). I always thought that this would mean I wouldn't have to bother with the hunting license requirement any longer, but looking at the way the law is written, I'm not sure.

What bothers me is that the above statement from the ATF uses the word "is" (emphasized) but the statute and CFR they cite doesn't use that word - it says:

"who, being an alien...has been admitted to the US under a nonimmigrant visa..." (emphasis added)

Now, doesn't that mean that I will always be subject to the hunting license requirement, as long as I'm an alien? I mean, since I have been admitted under a nonimmigrant visa, I'll never not have been right? It's not my current status, sure, but the statute doesn't say anything about that. It refers to what has happened in the past, which can't be changed.

Yet everyone (including the ATF) seems to think it's current status that matters. I don't see where they're getting this in the law that they cite.

Does anyone know the answer to this? Is there some trick to interpreting this, or is it just that the ATF can't read ?

Thanks!
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Old September 11, 2021, 11:19 PM   #2
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Quote:
divil .....I came to the US as a nonimmigrant, with a visa. Now, it's well known that nonimmigrants are generally not allowed to have guns, unless they have a hunting license:
A "nonimmigrant visa" is for students, tourists, temporary workers. A hunting license allows them to acquire firearms.

Those who are here on other types of visas do not have to provide a hunting license.

Legal permanent residents (green card holders) do not need a hunting license to acquire a firearm.

So yes, your current status is what matters.
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Old September 12, 2021, 07:45 AM   #3
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A "nonimmigrant visa" is for students, tourists, temporary workers. A hunting license allows them to acquire firearms.

Those who are here on other types of visas do not have to provide a hunting license.

Legal permanent residents (green card holders) do not need a hunting license to acquire a firearm.

So yes, your current status is what matters.
Well that's what the ATF says. But as I explained, this contradicts the statute. So where does this come from?
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Old September 12, 2021, 09:27 AM   #4
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It comes from an understanding of what the words "admitted to" mean.

When you first arrived in the United States, you "entered" under the authority of a non-immigrant visa. For the duration of that visa, while you were in the U.S. you were present under the authority of that visa. Thus, you were "admitted to" the U.S. by the non-immigrant visa.

That non-immigrant visa no longer exists. Although you may not have physically left the United States, your authority to be here is now a green card. Assuming that you didn't depart under the non-immigrant visa and then re-enter under the green card, your status changed by the stroke of a pen. The result is that your authorization to be in the U.S. now derives from your green card. Thus, you have now been "admitted to" the U.S. by the green card.

You are confusing "entered" with "admitted to."
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Old September 12, 2021, 09:34 AM   #5
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Originally Posted by Aguila Blanca View Post
It comes from an understanding of what the words "admitted to" mean.

When you first arrived in the United States, you "entered" under the authority of a non-immigrant visa. For the duration of that visa, while you were in the U.S. you were present under the authority of that visa. Thus, you were "admitted to" the U.S. by the non-immigrant visa.

That non-immigrant visa no longer exists. Although you may not have physically left the United States, your authority to be here is now a green card. Assuming that you didn't depart under the non-immigrant visa and then re-enter under the green card, your status changed by the stroke of a pen. The result is that your authorization to be in the U.S. now derives from your green card. Thus, you have now been "admitted to" the U.S. by the green card.

You are confusing "entered" with "admitted to."
Aguila is spot on.

My wife is in the same situation as you. She now has a CCW permit and owns several firearms. No problem, relax.
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Old September 12, 2021, 09:52 AM   #6
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It comes from an understanding of what the words "admitted to" mean.

When you first arrived in the United States, you "entered" under the authority of a non-immigrant visa. For the duration of that visa, while you were in the U.S. you were present under the authority of that visa. Thus, you were "admitted to" the U.S. by the non-immigrant visa.

That non-immigrant visa no longer exists. Although you may not have physically left the United States, your authority to be here is now a green card. Assuming that you didn't depart under the non-immigrant visa and then re-enter under the green card, your status changed by the stroke of a pen. The result is that your authorization to be in the U.S. now derives from your green card. Thus, you have now been "admitted to" the U.S. by the green card.

You are confusing "entered" with "admitted to."
Well I am confused, but not about that! I understand that I can be considered admitted under a green card now. What I don't understand is how the words "has been" can be construed to mean "is currently" or "most recently".

The fact is that I "have been" admitted under a non-immigrant visa, many times - just not on my most recent admission. But the statute in question doesn't mention your most recent admission. It doesn't say that if you were subsequently admitted on a permanent basis, then you're off the hook.
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Old September 12, 2021, 10:16 AM   #7
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Originally Posted by divil View Post
Well I am confused, but not about that! I understand that I can be considered admitted under a green card now. What I don't understand is how the words "has been" can be construed to mean "is currently" or "most recently".

The fact is that I "have been" admitted under a non-immigrant visa, many times - just not on my most recent admission. But the statute in question doesn't mention your most recent admission. It doesn't say that if you were subsequently admitted on a permanent basis, then you're off the hook.
<<An alien legally in the U.S. is not prohibited from purchasing firearms unless the alien is admitted into the U.S. under a nonimmigrant visa>>

Divil, seriously, relax, you do not have to worry about this.

Today, Sept 12 2021, you ARE not admitted into the U.S. under a nonimmigrant visa. Your old nonimmigrant visa is in fact invalid. Your current "admission" or acceptance (a synonym) to stay here is under your green card.

You are interpreting "admitted" as "first gained entry".
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Old September 12, 2021, 10:29 AM   #8
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Originally Posted by divil View Post
Well I am confused, but not about that! I understand that I can be considered admitted under a green card now. What I don't understand is how the words "has been" can be construed to mean "is currently" or "most recently".

The fact is that I "have been" admitted under a non-immigrant visa, many times - just not on my most recent admission. But the statute in question doesn't mention your most recent admission. It doesn't say that if you were subsequently admitted on a permanent basis, then you're off the hook.

Does a non-immigrant I-94 allow you to live/work in the US right now?

You may have been admitted as a non-immigrant, but you have adjudicated to an LPR (immigrant) thru USCIS. That card means the US is your home… even if you cannot vote or travel on a foreign passport.

But next time you buy a firearm… read the instructions on the back of the 4473.

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Old September 12, 2021, 10:42 AM   #9
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Quote:
Does a non-immigrant I-94 allow you to live/work in the US right now?
Not automatically, it depends on your status .Some non immigrant statuses allow you to do certain work, some don't.


Quote:
But next time you buy a firearm… read the instructions on the back of the 4473.
But I already know what the ATF thinks.
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Old September 12, 2021, 10:47 AM   #10
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You are interpreting "admitted" as "first gained entry"
I'm not sure how you're getting that from what I said. I'm not interpreting it as "first entry". I'm just interpreting "has been" as the past tense, and wondering why the ATF isn't.

They're saying it doesn't matter if I have been admitted as a nonimmigrant, as long I am currently not a nonimmigtrant. I just want to understand where they are getting that from.
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Old September 12, 2021, 10:51 AM   #11
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Changing from nonimmigrant alien to immigrant

Quote:
Originally Posted by divil View Post
Not automatically, it depends on your status .Some non immigrant statuses allow you to do certain work, some don't.
Bud, I’m asking you as “divil,” the person on the other end of the internet… typing a response.

You filling that form out is answering for you in regard to the transaction. Not whether people on a TD can work without getting an EAC thru USCIS.

If you did not have your green card, what allows YOU to live/work here? You lost that status when you adjusted to an LPR. To go back to that status, you’d have to give up your green card, then apply for admission and apply for it again.

But fine… you actually can answer that question as yes. The one following it would be another yes, as residency allows firearm ownership… and you would provide your green card as evidence. More work when ATF specifically says to answer it as such… being you are a permanent resident.
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Old September 12, 2021, 11:08 AM   #12
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Quote:
Originally Posted by divil
Quote:
You are interpreting "admitted" as "first gained entry"
I'm not sure how you're getting that from what I said. I'm not interpreting it as "first entry". I'm just interpreting "has been" as the past tense, and wondering why the ATF isn't.
They are.

As both Pistoler0 and I have pointed out, you are confusing "admitted to" with "entered."

Mundane example: About a year ago I was admitted to a gun club that I had been on a waiting list to join. I received notification that I had been "admitted to" membership by e-mail -- without having set foot on the property. In the legal field, lawyers are "admitted to" the bar, meaning they are authorized to practice in a certain state, or to argue cases before the Supreme Court. It doesn't [necessarily] mean physically entering a location or a premises.

You received your green card on some date in the past. That was when you were "admitted to" the U.S. as a permanent resident. Past tense.
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Old September 12, 2021, 11:33 AM   #13
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Quote:
They are.

As both Pistoler0 and I have pointed out, you are confusing "admitted to" with "entered."

Mundane example: About a year ago I was admitted to a gun club that I had been on a waiting list to join. I received notification that I had been "admitted to" membership by e-mail -- without having set foot on the property. In the legal field, lawyers are "admitted to" the bar, meaning they are authorized to practice in a certain state, or to argue cases before the Supreme Court. It doesn't [necessarily] mean physically entering a location or a premises.

You received your green card on some date in the past. That was when you were "admitted to" the U.S. as a permanent resident. Past tense.
I appreciate the replies everyone, but I'm totally baffled by why we are not on the same page!

You guys (and the ATF) seem to think that being admitted as a permanent resident means that I haven't bee admitted as a nonimmigant. In other words, they are mutually exclusive. Is that what you're saying?

The statute says that if you have been admitted on a nonimmigrant visa, then the prohibition applies to you, can we agree on that? So in order for it to not apply, you must not have been admitted on a nonimmigrant visa, agreed?

So if you agree that I, Divil, have been admitted on a nonimmigrant visa, then you must agree that the prohibition applies to me, right?

I have been admitted to the US on a nonimmigrant visa 30 times. On that 30th trip, I adjusted my status with USCIS, and am now deemed to have been admitted as a permanent resident. So the final score is: admitted 30 times as a nonimmigrant, and once as an immigrant. So how can you say that I haven't been admitted as a nonimmigrant?
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Old September 12, 2021, 12:08 PM   #14
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Changing from nonimmigrant alien to immigrant

So, a person comes to the US as a non-immigrant, the visa is the key to the door… the I-94 is what says how long someone can stay.

I-94s are Arrival/Departure Records. The admission stamp has the date you were admitted, and if done correctly… there should be a visa class and printed date on the I-94 that says when your admission is up… meaning you have to be out by. CBP getting that I-94 by that date (or in a way to prove you were out of the US by then) shows you were not an overstay. Similarly, you have a matching stamp in the passport… with the date written along with the visa class. That gives you a record of admission in your passport.

So, what I’m gathering… you think because it states, “Are you an alien who has been admitted to the United States under a nonimmigrant visa?,” it is asking whether you have ever been admitted as a non-immigrant.

That is not the point of the question, and the instructions I quoted earlier prove that. There are plenty of US citizens that naturalized… and have previously been non-immigrants. Who cares? They are allowed to own firearms as citizens… and in your case, as a resident.

To go back to the admission process, even our systems state “admitted to.” Admission happens at the port of entry, when an officer stamps your passport, charges you $6, hands it back, and says “welcome to the US.” So from then until you turn in the I-94/leave… you are admitted. That question is asking at the time of checking yes/no, are you admitted into the US as a non-immigrant? Not if you adjusted status, and were originally a non-immigrant.

If you currently are a non-immigrant… you need to show how you can legally acquire a firearm (hunting license). Which is why they state permanent residents can answer no… being you don’t need an I-94 to be in the US and are not a non-immigrant.

And I do not agree… you are an LPR. You are a resident of the US. Just like US citizens, I do not admit them. I admit foreign nationals, under a visa classification. Sometimes I parole them in as emergency assistance… being there is no visa class that allows people to work in that manner in the US (but that is going way too far into the INA than it is worth).
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Old September 12, 2021, 12:34 PM   #15
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So, what I’m gathering… you think because it states, “Are you an alien who has been admitted to the United States under a nonimmigrant visa?,” it is asking whether you have ever been admitted as a non-immigrant.

That is not the point of the question, and the instructions I quoted earlier prove that. There are plenty of US citizens that naturalized… and have previously been non-immigrants. Who cares? They are allowed to own firearms as citizens… and in your case, as a resident.
Well I'm not asking anything about the questions on the 4473, as I explained before. But yes I do think that "has been" means the same thing as "has ever been". I mean, you could argue that they could mean slightly different things, but I wouldn't bet my freedom on it.

But are you claiming, given the history I explained in my last post, that I haven't been admitted on a nonimmigrant visa?

Regarding citizens, that's irrelevant. The statute I quoted in my original post says

Quote:
who, being an alien...has been admitted to the US under a nonimmigrant visa.
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Old September 12, 2021, 12:40 PM   #16
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Quote:
“Are you an alien who has been admitted to the United States under a nonimmigrant visa?,”
Don't add words where there are none.
You are being asked ARE you . . . ?
... not "have you ever been"...
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Old September 12, 2021, 12:48 PM   #17
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Originally Posted by divil View Post
Well I'm not asking anything about the questions on the 4473, as I explained before. But yes I do think that "has been" means the same thing as "has ever been". I mean, you could argue that they could mean slightly different things, but I wouldn't bet my freedom on it.

Are you claiming, given the history I explained my last post, that I haven't been admitted on a nonimmigrant visa?

Regarding citizens, that's irrelevant. The statute I quoted in my original post says

I am not saying you’ve never been admitted as a non-immigrant… but you are not admitted as a non-immigrant. You are a Legal Permanent Resident of the US. That admission ended the day your petition was approved, and either you got notification from USCIS or had an ADIT stamp put in your passport (probably received an I-797, but USCIS has been a s***show over the past few years that I try not to suggest on how they handle stuff anymore).

A lot of this confusion is because of the one time admission date, people say “admitted” in the sense that they were legally allowed entry into the US. So, admitted seems past tense… but not when you are talking about current status of an alien. “Admitted” means they are good to be here until whatever date they were admitted to.

Like mentioned, with that logic… there would be plenty of US citizens forced to have a hunting license due to their past immigration status.

But hey, if you want to cover your bases… don’t ask the forum. Get an immigration attorney, and pay them to find out/explain.
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Old September 12, 2021, 01:04 PM   #18
divil
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I am not saying you’ve never been admitted as a non-immigrant… but you are not admitted as a non-immigrant.
But which one does the statute I quoted refer to: been admitted, (past tense) or are admitted (present tense)?

It clearly says that it applies to aliens who have been admitted under a nonimmigrant visa. Have I been been so admitted, or not?

Quote:
Like mentioned, with that logic… there would be plenty of US citizens forced to have a hunting license due to their past immigration status.
No, there wouldn't - you're not reading my posts. I've quoted the relevant statute twice now. Citizens are not aliens. Therefore laws that begin "...who, being an alien..." don't apply to them.
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Old September 12, 2021, 01:44 PM   #19
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Originally Posted by divil View Post
But which one does the statute I quoted refer to: been admitted, (past tense) or are admitted (present tense)?

It clearly says that it applies to aliens who have been admitted under a nonimmigrant visa. Have I been been so admitted, or not?



No, there wouldn't - you're not reading my posts. I've quoted the relevant statute twice now. Citizens are not aliens. Therefore laws that begin "...who, being an alien..." don't apply to them.
From the quote in your first post… “is.” Sounds to be present tense.

18 USC §922(y) also says “has been,” so leaning that way… present tense.

If you are retroactively applying laws to yourself, then you’d have to retroactively apply them to nationalized citizens… no? They were aliens when they applied for the non-immigrant status. So, have you ever been admitted as a non-immigrant… those citizens would have to answer yes. And the same statues would have to be followed, if it was considered that way.

This as why I’m confused with your logic. You are not admitted as a non-immigrant… you are an LPR. LPRs are not admitted in the US. LPRs are not on non-immigrant visas, so non-immigration restrictions don’t apply to them.

Shy of that, if you want any more clarification… call an immigration lawyer.
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Old September 12, 2021, 02:33 PM   #20
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Quote:
From the quote in your first post… “is.” Sounds to be present tense.

18 USC §922(y) also says “has been,” so leaning that way… present tense.

If you are retroactively applying laws to yourself, then you’d have to retroactively apply them to nationalized citizens… no? They were aliens when they applied for the non-immigrant status. So, have you ever been admitted as a non-immigrant… those citizens would have to answer yes. And the same statues would have to be followed, if it was considered that way.

This as why I’m confused with your logic. You are not admitted as a non-immigrant… you are an LPR. LPRs are not admitted in the US. LPRs are not on non-immigrant visas, so non-immigration restrictions don’t apply to them.

Shy of that, if you want any more clarification… call an immigration lawyer.
Lol I'm at my wits end here! I am writing in what I think is plain English, but something is not coming across.

I don't know why you think I'm applying anything retroactively. The law has to be applied to the circumstances that existed at the time the act was committed (the act in question being, possession of a gun or ammunition).

The law says "...being an alien". This is the present tense, relative to when the act was committed.

Next it says "has been admitted". This is the past tense relative to when the act was committed..

(Technically, it's called the "present perfect tense" if anyone wants to be technical, but it obviously refers to past events.)

So, if a person was a citizen when they possessed a gun, then the "being an alien" part excludes them, and they don't need to read any further.

But it at the time they possessed a gun, the person was an alien, and had been admitted (any time in the past) under a nonimmigrant visa, then the law should apply to them. That's what the plain English of it says.
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Old September 12, 2021, 02:34 PM   #21
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divil,

with all due respect, continuing this conversation does no longer provide any value added to the OP's issue, in my opinion.

For all practical reasons, we are all telling you that as far as firearm ownership is concerned you are in the clear once you have US permanent residency (I-551). That was my case years ago (now a citizen) and my wife's current status. You are not unique in this, trust me.

But of course, if you do not feel like relying on the advice of an internet bulletin board (understandable), the wisest thing to do would be to consult a specialized attorney.

Now if the point of continuing this is to engage on an academic exercise on the merits or the appropriateness of how the language in the law is crafted, that is a different matter.
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Old September 12, 2021, 02:44 PM   #22
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divil,

with all due respect, continuing this conversation does no longer provide any value added to the OP's issue, in my opinion.

For all practical reasons, we are all telling you that as far as firearm ownership is concerned you are in the clear once you have US permanent residency. That was my case years ago (now a citizen) and my wife's current status. You are not unique in this, trust me.

But of course, if you do not feel like relying on the advice of an internet bulletin board (understandable), the wisest thing to do would be to consult a specialized attorney.

Now if the point of continuing this is to engage on an academic exercise on the merits or the appropriateness of how the language in the law is crafted, that is a different matter.
Sorry I'm at a loss to understand you here. I am the OP. I came here to ask why the common interpretation from the ATF (and everyone else) is what it is, given that it's contradicted by the statute. Continuing the conversation is valuable to me as long as there is still hope of someone answering my question.

My question wasn't based on a belief that I'm unique in this situation. I'm not asking anyone to act as a lawyer here or give me legal advice.
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Old September 12, 2021, 03:21 PM   #23
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Originally Posted by divil View Post
Lol I'm at my wits end here! I am writing in what I think is plain English, but something is not coming across.

I don't know why you think I'm applying anything retroactively. The law has to be applied to the circumstances that existed at the time the act was committed (the act in question being, possession of a gun or ammunition).

The law says "...being an alien". This is the present tense, relative to when the act was committed.

Next it says "has been admitted". This is the past tense relative to when the act was committed..

(Technically, it's called the "present perfect tense" if anyone wants to be technical, but it obviously refers to past events.)

So, if a person was a citizen when they possessed a gun, then the "being an alien" part excludes them, and they don't need to read any further.

But it at the time they possessed a gun, the person was an alien, and had been admitted (any time in the past) under a nonimmigrant visa, then the law should apply to them. That's what the plain English of it says.
Immigration lawyer… because I’m actually tired of trying to explain it.

But in a final attempt, you see how you pulled the alien part out from the citizen example above? LPR pulls the non-immigrant aspect out of the same definition. You are no longer a non-immigrant.

When I go to work, and processing travelers… non-immigrants are “admitted” to X date (not going to discuss exceptions, because this has been really has got out of hand). LPR or US citizen hands me their documents… there is no “admit to” date. They are released from the port of entry… not admitted to the US. They are coming home, not “being allowed” to enter the US.

It may seem odd, but unless you are taught the INA, it really is difficult to understand most of the US immigration laws. Where some agencies don’t understand the specific examples of immigration status (ATF really just deals with alcohol, tobacco, firearms, and explosives… not immigration/customs; they give CBP responsibility of applying a lot of the customs law related to those), that is actually pretty clear in these points, from my viewpoint. That being said, I still recommend talking to an immigration lawyer… because not only can they confirm there isn’t any deviation to your situation (very much doubt it, because LPR is cut/dry), they are being paid to explain it to you. Us getting frustrated doesn’t mean you are in the wrong, just that it is a concept that might be harder to explain over the internet.

I did pretty well on the immigration aspect of my academy, and have dealt with a few different aspects of immigration that is even more confusing (try figuring out North American Indian status with the Jay Treaty… which was signed 200+ years ago… if you want to really get confused). That being said, I still learn new aspects of the INA regularly.
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Old September 12, 2021, 03:43 PM   #24
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Immigration lawyer… because I’m actually tired of trying to explain it.

But in a final attempt, you see how you pulled the alien part out from the citizen example above? LPR pulls the non-immigrant aspect out of the same definition. You are no longer a non-immigrant.

When I go to work, and processing travelers… non-immigrants are “admitted” to X date (not going to discuss exceptions, because this has been really has got out of hand). LPR or US citizen hands me their documents… there is no “admit to” date. They are released from the port of entry… not admitted to the US. They are coming home, not “being allowed” to enter the US.

It may seem odd, but unless you are taught the INA, it really is difficult to understand most of the US immigration laws. Where some agencies don’t understand the specific examples of immigration status (ATF really just deals with alcohol, tobacco, firearms, and explosives… not immigration/customs; they give CBP responsibility of applying a lot of the customs law related to those), that is actually pretty clear in these points, from my viewpoint. That being said, I still recommend talking to an immigration lawyer… because not only can they confirm there isn’t any deviation to your situation (very much doubt it, because LPR is cut/dry), they are being paid to explain it to you. Us getting frustrated doesn’t mean you are in the wrong, just that it is a concept that might be harder to explain over the internet.

I did pretty well on the immigration aspect of my academy, and have dealt with a few different aspects of immigration that is even more confusing (try figuring out North American Indian status with the Jay Treaty… which was signed 200+ years ago… if you want to really get confused). That being said, I still learn new aspects of the INA regularly.
Well thanks for taking the time to try and explain it, I really do appreciate it and I hope you don't think I'm trying to be difficult on purpose.

I think this statement is the crux of the issue:

Quote:
But in a final attempt, you see how you pulled the alien part out from the citizen example above? LPR pulls the non-immigrant aspect out of the same definition. You are no longer a non-immigrant.
I get what you are saying here, and if the statute said that nonmmigrants are prohibited, I would agree with you 100% - in fact, I would not even have started the thread. Because that's a question of status, and as you have correctly said, I am not in nonimmigrant status.

But since the statute doesn't say anything about status, but instead refers to how you were admitted in the past, I can't see a way around it.

BTW, as an aside, just in case anyone thinks that the phrase "has been admitted under a nonimmigrant visa" means exactly the same thing as "is currently a nonimmigrant", I can offer unequivocal proof that it doesn't - see this memo from the justice department:


171 Firearms Disabilities of Nonimmigrant AliensUnder the Gun Control Act


That memo explains that the ATF was wrong in assuming that the prohibition applies to all nonimmigrants; it only applies to those admitted under a visa (so tourists on the visa waiver program for example are exempt). The memo nevertheless still takes the position that current status matters, so it still doesn't answer my question here - I quote it here only to show that the ATF can be wrong about the law, and the exact words do matter, at least sometimes. Just in case anything thinks I'm being pedantic.
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Old September 12, 2021, 04:42 PM   #25
Aguila Blanca
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Quote:
Originally Posted by divil
Sorry I'm at a loss to understand you here. I am the OP. I came here to ask why the common interpretation from the ATF (and everyone else) is what it is, given that it's contradicted by the statute. Continuing the conversation is valuable to me as long as there is still hope of someone answering my question.
Multiple people HAVE answered your question, and you refuse to accept the answer. The answer is that your current status is that you were (past tense) admitted as a permanent resident alien. The 30 times you entered previously on a non-immigrant visa don't have anything to do with it.

Question 21.l.1 asks, "Are you an alien who has been admitted to the United States under a nonimmigrant visa?" It is referring to the admission that put you currently in the U.S. It does NOT ask, "Are you an alien who has ever been admitted to the United States under a nonimmigrant visa?"

But, okay. You don't like that answer, so I'll change mine:

You can't ever possess a firearm in the U.S. unless you maintain a hunting license.

Happy now?
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