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Old October 12, 2021, 09:14 PM   #1
Linker
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What height rings

Recently got a Ruger Hawkey. It was used and came without rings. I need rings but do not know what height rings I need or usually come with the rifle. Any one know out there? They come in short, medium and high. Thanks....
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Old October 12, 2021, 10:02 PM   #2
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It depends entiret entirely on the scope you use. Find out where the optic needs to be and where that places the front Bell of the optic. You can then measure to the bottom of the tube, then add one half diameter of the tube to find how high above the rail the center of the optic needs to be. USUALLY medium is fine. If your optic has a large objective lens you might need taller, or shorter could work.

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Old October 14, 2021, 03:29 AM   #3
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Bolt throw might have some influence too. I'll dig up my Hawkeye and take a look.
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Old October 14, 2021, 03:49 AM   #4
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Here's my special edition 35 whelen Hawkeye, one of my most prized rifles. Fitted with a rudimentary Leupold 3x9 it works fine with what are low rings I believe.



You are free to move about the cabin and drool.
Attached Images
File Type: jpg IMG_5877.jpg (185.6 KB, 146 views)
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Old October 14, 2021, 05:36 AM   #5
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Drooling a plenty!!! I love CRF actions. Like pretty red headed women. I know, I am a nut job. All these answers are on point. Check your objective bell size on your glass, bolt throw, and also if you have a cheek piece or not, this will make a difference, if albeit is a small one.

You want the rings that are going to naturally put your eye in line with the scope, and little to no jostling about to get your picture straight. When you snap that rifle to your shoulder, you want to be looking through the scope as a natural part of the movements. Too high, and your cheek will be off the stock, too low, and you might as well be eating stock, as well as issues of brass clearance, bolt handle impact, and improper mounting.
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Old October 14, 2021, 08:39 AM   #6
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The folks who answered pretty much covered it all.
The ring height must be high enough the scope does not contact the barrel or bolt handle.
This gets to be more of a factor if you choose a scope with a large objective lens.

The ring height or stock geometry must also fit the shooter. Some folks struggle with scopes trying to "find" the image in the scope. Thats an indication the rifle is not set up right.
Its true the perfect stock fit might be a little different in different positions. Prone versus standing,for example.
So the "correct" answer might be a little different for a 14 lb bench gun versus a light hunting rifle you might want to tune for a shot standing on your hind legs.

For a hunting rifle,what I do for myself.. I tune for standing. I'm less wobbly when my inner ears are in a natural,level position. I don't scrunch my head down to the gun.
I bring the gun to my face,standing naturally.

My scope is positioned correctly if,with my rifle low,at "port arms", I can look at a target,close my eyes,then shoulder the rifle naturally,eyes still closed. Now I open my eyes. I must see the full,open field of view in the scope,crosshairs in the general direction of the target.

Its not OK to have to lift my head or wiggle my face to "find" the scope.

Once you set up your rifles this way,the struggle of "finding the target in the scope" goes away. I'm not suggesting you launch rifle bullets into the sky,but its not unrealistic to be able to find a target like a flushing pheasant in a 6X scope. Look at the target,shoulder the rifle,you should have full field of view through the scope.
Along with ring height,this is when you adjust eye relief. Use all the scope has to offer so long as you get full field of view.
That scope bell hitting your eyebow will make you bleed. Then you have a flinch to get over.

This ring height thing is why,IMO,the big astronomical 50 mm or 56 mm objective scopes are out of place on a hunting rifle.
In my experience,the "sweet spot" is usually 42mm objective lense or smaller,mounted in low rings.....But You have to find what fits you with your rifle.
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Old October 14, 2021, 09:41 AM   #7
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Drooling a plenty!!! I love CRF actions. Like pretty red headed women. I know, I am a nut job. All these answers are on point.
Far from it--there are plenty of people who love the model 77's and model 70's--perfect examples of the classic rifles made right (for more reasons than just the CRF bolt) and "if it ain't broke, fix it and make it worse."
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Old October 15, 2021, 07:24 AM   #8
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Not to steal your thread--but since I dug up my 77 I just had to go out a put a few cartridges through it.

35 whelen is probably at or near the top of the list for "most under-appreciated but truly useful cartridges of all time" IMO. It's at the top of food chain for 30-06 parented cartridges IMO and really is a "poor man's big game magnum" in disguise. I fire other big-hitting magnums, but what's especially nice about the 35 whelen is that it delivers immense energy in a wide bullet which for the bullet type is flat shooting and affords an excellent point-blank trajectory out to 300 yds or so, probably as far or further than most hunters will ever shoot. My guess is that it fell out of popularity because it was initially fielded in lightweight hunting rifles which took advantage of conventional long actions, in which it can give the shooter a very sharp kick. My ruger 77 which is zeroed at 200 yds is very accurate with 225 gamekings driven to around 2700 fps by H4895.
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Old October 15, 2021, 12:19 PM   #9
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Ruger uses a unique mounting system. Most come from the factory with one medium ring meant to be mounted on the rear and a single low ring for the front. That works well for most scopes up to 40mm.

If you want to mount higher you only have to buy 1 new ring. Buy a high ring and mount it on the rear and move the medium to the front.

You can see the difference in Stagpanthers photo.

I think Ruger offers 4 or 5 different ring heights , but you can't use 2 of the same due to the way the receiver is milled.

With most bolt rifles the rear receiver ring is lower than the front. The rear base will be thicker to get the scope level. But since Ruger has dovetails cut into the receiver they make up the difference in the ring height.
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Old October 16, 2021, 11:43 AM   #10
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I try and buy local, I'm fortunate to have a cabelas 15min away. I buy a low and a medium and take back the one I don't need on my next trip.
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Old October 21, 2021, 06:14 AM   #11
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As JMR40 pointed out, the Ruger 77, 77 MKII, and Hawkeye use different rings front & back.

If a low front ring, then a medium rear ring.
Medium front takes high rear.
Etc...

I'm running low front, medium rear on my two 77 MKIIs. That with a 40mm, and a 42mm scope.
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Old October 23, 2021, 11:14 PM   #12
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Quote:
Originally Posted by jmr40 View Post
Ruger uses a unique mounting system. Most come from the factory with one medium ring meant to be mounted on the rear and a single low ring for the front. That works well for most scopes up to 40mm.



If you want to mount higher you only have to buy 1 new ring. Buy a high ring and mount it on the rear and move the medium to the front.



You can see the difference in Stagpanthers photo.



I think Ruger offers 4 or 5 different ring heights , but you can't use 2 of the same due to the way the receiver is milled.



With most bolt rifles the rear receiver ring is lower than the front. The rear base will be thicker to get the scope level. But since Ruger has dovetails cut into the receiver they make up the difference in the ring height.
I noticed the same when looking at the photo. How do the rings align their axis? Then I noticed the pivoting pins at the base. It is indeed different.

But still with different ring heights the scope is pointing down. 1/4" in 4" or something like that. That's 225 MOA! How does it work? What's the benefits of doing that? Apparently they are doing it for a reason. Just wondering.

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Old October 24, 2021, 06:04 AM   #13
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you have to mount them and try them I had low mounts on my tikka but extra low suited me cheek weld matters
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Old October 24, 2021, 08:54 AM   #14
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The receiver is a different height front ring vs. back. Thus the scope is level to the bore using different height rings.
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Old October 24, 2021, 10:22 AM   #15
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This one has strayed off into the twilight zone--what's so hard about buying a properly matched set?
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Old October 24, 2021, 11:34 AM   #16
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Ricklin View Post
The receiver is a different height front ring vs. back. Thus the scope is level to the bore using different height rings.
Perhaps. But I don't see that in the picture. The scope looks pointing downwards. Is it for extremely long range? Puzzling.

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Old October 24, 2021, 01:08 PM   #17
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Perhaps. But I don't see that in the picture. The scope looks pointing downwards. Is it for extremely long range? Puzzling.
Optical conclusion (and distortion from an iPhone)--it's 0 MOA (otherwise you'd have a cant in the scope by the rings). Offset height rings are actually quite common.
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Old October 24, 2021, 02:11 PM   #18
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Quote:
Originally Posted by stagpanther View Post
Optical conclusion (and distortion from an iPhone)--it's 0 MOA (otherwise you'd have a cant in the scope by the rings). Offset height rings are actually quite common.
It must be the case, or it is not making sense. Thanks.

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Old October 24, 2021, 03:18 PM   #19
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Quote:
But still with different ring heights the scope is pointing down. 1/4" in 4"
The scope is level. The strap holding the scope caps on is angled downward and creating an optical illusion.
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Old October 24, 2021, 03:25 PM   #20
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Quote:
This one has strayed off into the twilight zone--what's so hard about buying a properly matched set?
When buying the rifle you get a set. One low, one medium. But when buying rings separate from the rifle they are sold individually and you have to know which one to buy. You normally only need to buy a single ring to change scope height with a Ruger.

And the more I look at the photo the more it does appear to be canted forward. It looks like there is a low ring on the front. If so the rear ring should be a medium. But someone may have put a high ring on the rear by mistake. Another photo without the scope caps would help clarify.
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Old October 24, 2021, 06:51 PM   #21
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Quote:
But when buying rings separate from the rifle they are sold individually and you have to know which one to buy.
I bought my 77 slightly used and it did not come with rings--take my word for it I would have to buy every ring on the market if I had to figure it out on my own--I'm certain I bought a matched set--though I can't remember who from--I'll check to see if I can figure it out. When I mounted the scope I used the wheeler ring lapping kit--which includes the nifty alignment points, I doubt those could be aligned properly if the height was not matched by the rings.
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Last edited by stagpanther; October 24, 2021 at 06:58 PM.
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Old October 24, 2021, 08:27 PM   #22
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Just CALL RUGER, tell them what rifle you have and what scope you plan to use and they'll tell you what the correct rings are.

I don't know the hawkeye, but do know the original Model 77, the short action guns had bases made as part of the receiver and used Ruger rings.

The long actions (known at the time as the "round top") was drilled and tapped for regular scope mounts like weaver, etc.

I do not remember clearly any more been too many years since I had one, but I don't think the Ruger rings would fit weaver type bases, nor would "regular" rings fit the Ruger bases.

Does the Hawkeye take any rings or just Ruger rings? Ruger would tell you that too. Bet they'd even do it over the phone!
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Old October 25, 2021, 07:07 PM   #23
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Quote:
Originally Posted by 44 AMP View Post
Just CALL RUGER, tell them what rifle you have and what scope you plan to use and they'll tell you what the correct rings are.

I don't know the hawkeye, but do know the original Model 77, the short action guns had bases made as part of the receiver and used Ruger rings.

The long actions (known at the time as the "round top") was drilled and tapped for regular scope mounts like weaver, etc.

I do not remember clearly any more been too many years since I had one, but I don't think the Ruger rings would fit weaver type bases, nor would "regular" rings fit the Ruger bases.

Does the Hawkeye take any rings or just Ruger rings? Ruger would tell you that too. Bet they'd even do it over the phone!
Also.... a very logical suggestion.
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Old October 27, 2021, 03:03 AM   #24
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When putting a 44mm objective scope on my M77 MkII 7Mag, I had to go up a size.

Call Ruger or lay rifle out and place scope above action. Measure the ring height and buy accordingly
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Old October 27, 2021, 07:35 AM   #25
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Originally Posted by BornFighting88 View Post
Drooling a plenty!!! I love CRF actions. Like pretty red headed women. I know, I am a nut job. All these answers are on point. Check your objective bell size on your glass, bolt throw, and also if you have a cheek piece or not, this will make a difference, if albeit is a small one.

You want the rings that are going to naturally put your eye in line with the scope, and little to no jostling about to get your picture straight. When you snap that rifle to your shoulder, you want to be looking through the scope as a natural part of the movements. Too high, and your cheek will be off the stock, too low, and you might as well be eating stock, as well as issues of brass clearance, bolt handle impact, and improper mounting.
Do you really think every shot fired is a rifle snapped to the shoulder ? Scopes,stocks,people all are different,there is no law of where a scope needs mounted . Take short range BR for example,some of those scopes are mounted high enough so the shooter's head does not even touch the scope, and the list goes on .
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