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Old June 6, 2019, 02:13 PM   #1
105GunGrunt
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Webley\Enfield Mk VI Trigger

I have just acquired and Enfield Mk VI mfg in the 1920s and transfered from UK forces to Irish Constabulary. I have thoroughly disassembled and cleaned all of the parts. The cylinder was shaved so I am shooting autorim brass with lead bullets. The pistol, on a bench rest, is very, very accurate at 25yds.

My question is about trigger pull. It is heavy. I get that. All I would like to do is make it as smooth as possible by polishing all of the contact points, particularly in single action mode, but I am not sure what parts of the trigger contact what part of the hammer. I have a lot of parts diagrams, but can't find an illustration of the relationship between the trigger and hammer.

So . . can anyone provide me the information I seek? What part of the trigger mechanism locks back the hammer?

Thanks
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Old June 6, 2019, 09:25 PM   #2
Bill DeShivs
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What you want to do should be done by a competent gunsmith only.
Amateur action jobs can easily ruin a firearm, and there are no spare parts for your gun.
Spend the money and get it done properly and safely.
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Old June 7, 2019, 12:25 AM   #3
5whiskey
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OP take a fools advice... leave that trigger alone. It’s nearly 100 years old, has historical value, and is not a great candidate for a trigger job. If you just Wanna do some kitchen table smithing, buy a Ruger gp100 rode hard for cheap and play with that. They’re one of the most forgiving revolvers to practice home gunsmithing on. And ultimately that Wesley will be worth something one day. Even with shaved cylinder.
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Old June 7, 2019, 12:28 PM   #4
105GunGrunt
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To be clear, I have no intention of changing the geometry or relationship between the trigger and hammer. I only want to polish the contact points. I am just not sure what part of the trigger holds the hammer in firing position.
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Old June 7, 2019, 04:14 PM   #5
AK103K
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I just dry fire it. I use snap caps, but whatever you want.

I can pretty much guarentee, the more you dry fire it, the better the trigger will get.

Even if it doesn't actually get better, it will feel like it as your tone and experience with the gun improves.
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Old June 7, 2019, 11:53 PM   #6
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Quote:
To be clear, I have no intention of changing the geometry or relationship between the trigger and hammer.
Reasonable and prudent, HOWEVER, even with the best of intentions, errors can happen. The only way to ensure it won't happen (and even then its not 100%) is to use a jig, and I doubt you'll find one for the Webley or Enfield revolvers..

I've got a 1917 Mk VI, and it has been "barely" shaved, .45 Auto Rim won't work, only .45acp with certain 1/2 moon clips. Trigger pull is very heavy DA, and acceptable to me SA. I just live with it.
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Old June 8, 2019, 12:14 PM   #7
T. O'Heir
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"...just dry fire it..." That just causes premature wear on the parts.
There's more to smoothing a trigger than the mating parts. You need to polish the sides of the parts too.
I'd suggest that if you don't know how the thing works, you should either learn that or forget the trigger job. (The sear is AKA the Hammer Catch.) Keeping in mind that a Webley Mk VI is not a target revolver.
This might help some though. Be sure you do not lose any of the assorted springs and wee screws too.
https://www.americanrifleman.org/art...k-vi-revolver/
So might this. There's a cut away drawing. Isn't a great one though.
https://www.historynet.com/webley-sc...-of-choice.htm
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Old June 11, 2019, 11:42 AM   #8
AK103K
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Quote:
Originally Posted by T. O'Heir View Post
"...just dry fire it..." That just causes premature wear on the parts.
No worse than actually shooting it.

If you have something definitive that shows it does, Id like to see it.

I dry fire pretty much all the guns I have, all the time, including my old Enfield. Never had a problem with anything wearing out or breaking.

The guns I shoot on a regular basis, are dry fired even more.

The benefit gained from dry firing far outweighs the minuscule chance something might break.

The other big benefit to dry firing is, especially with DA triggers in DAO mode, is you build and maintain the muscle tone needed to shoot that type of action well. And I truly believe, that lack of tone is more of an issue than 98% of the triggers out there, when it comes to shooting them well. Learn to shoot a DA revolver DAO, and you can shoot pretty much any trigger, without any problem, or the need to fiddle with them.
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Old June 11, 2019, 01:39 PM   #9
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The benefit gained from dry firing far outweighs the minuscule chance something might break.
That's a judgement call, for you it works, for someone else, might not.

Dry firing with proper snap caps does no damage, no worse than shooting, and without the pressure of actual firing. Dry firing without proper snap caps MIGHT do damage, and when talking about 100 year old (or so) guns where the only replacement parts are those from parted out junked guns, I don't see the benefit to dry firing being worth the risk.

We accept the risk of something breaking during actual shooting of these old guns, but I see no point in potentially adding to it.

Like the guys who have been shooting .45acp AMMO from converted Webleys "for decades" and nothing bad happened, (.45acp ammo is essentially a proof load for the Webley) I say, that's right, nothing bad has happened, YET.

Maybe you shoot the gun another 20 years and nothing bad happens, or maybe, the next time you pull the trigger something major and important cracks or breaks.
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