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Old April 26, 2021, 09:20 PM   #1
chrisintexas
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Front serrations in semi-automatics?

What are/is the purpose of front serrations in semi-automatics? I see downsides.
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Old April 26, 2021, 09:34 PM   #2
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I don't see any "sides". Conceptually, front serrations were intended to make it easier for the shooter to open the slide to check the chamber to see if a round was chambered (or not). Except for pistols configured like most CZs, when the slide is buried inside the frame and gaining a surer purchase on the slide is beneficial for a "chamber check", I don't see any advantage to front serrations- plus, imo, they look "tacticool" contrived and serve no more purpose than serrations at the rear of the slide do. Other than being ugly and superfluous, I don't see any real "downsides" (other than maybe offering too much invitation for the careless to get a hand in front of a muzzle unnecessarily).
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Old April 26, 2021, 10:29 PM   #3
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It is my understanding that the front serrations on the slide of an auto are there to enable people to shoot themselves in the palm of their hand when checking to see if they have loaded the chamber.
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Old April 26, 2021, 11:14 PM   #4
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Some 1911s have them to aid in “press checking” the pistol to see if it has a round in the chamber. A press check is just retracting the slide far enough to check the chamber. I prefer not to have them on my 1911s, but it’s not a big deal. It always seemed to invite losing a piece of a finger, but I’ve never actually heard of that happening.
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Old April 26, 2021, 11:25 PM   #5
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Front serrations in semi-automatics?

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Originally Posted by dahermit View Post
It is my understanding that the front serrations on the slide of an auto are there to enable people to shoot themselves in the palm of their hand when checking to see if they have loaded the chamber.

I get that front serrations are more forward than rear serrations, hence the names, but I fail to see how using them requires a palm to be in front of the muzzle at any point.


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Old April 27, 2021, 12:19 AM   #6
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Originally Posted by TunnelRat View Post
I get that front serrations are more forward than rear serrations, hence the names, but I fail to see how using them requires a palm to be in front of the muzzle at any point.


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Requires , no.
Promotes, yes.
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Old April 27, 2021, 12:24 AM   #7
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Front serrations in semi-automatics?

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Originally Posted by ballardw View Post
Requires , no.
Promotes, yes.

If a person is putting his or her hand in front of the muzzle when using front serrations then that person is being negligent. If a person is concerned that in using front serrations he or she won’t be both able to keep his or her finger off the trigger and his or her palm not in front of a muzzle then by all means that person shouldn’t use them. The previous is true of all firearms handling; if you don’t feel comfortable doing it then don’t do it. Using a pistol without a manual safety, carrying a firearm on your person, keeping a round chambered, the list goes on. I would accept the argument that all of these increase one’s risk. I wouldn’t go so far as to say they promote negligence.


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Old April 27, 2021, 01:00 AM   #8
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They are there to look cool and tear up holsters.

Seriously, I think they originated in competition guns with optics before we had compact red-dot sights. The much larger (and more fragile) sights required mounts that attached to the frame instead of the slide and the mounts could make it difficult or impossible to get to the rear serrations to rack the slide.
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Old April 27, 2021, 01:02 AM   #9
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Quote:
Originally Posted by JohnKSa
They are there to look cool and tear up holsters.
Roger that.
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Old April 27, 2021, 02:13 AM   #10
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How soon we forget.....

Front serrations on slides date from the 80s into the 90s, where they were popular on the race guns of the era, which often used the optics of the times and the mounts for those optics attached to the frame (grips) which covered the standard rear slide serrations

So serrations for gripping (to chamber a round) were cut into the front of the slide, because the regular ones were covered in whole or part by the optics mounts.

And, for a while they had a "cool" factor, and so were retained by some gun makers after advances in optics and mounts changed, eliminating their usefulness.

Clearly, based on the responses in this thread, the "cool factor" has been largely forgotten.

JohnKSa posted a shorter and correct explanation as I was typing this.
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Old April 27, 2021, 05:23 AM   #11
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They are for press checks. Personally it is a technique I don't like. If I press check it will be fro. The rear of the gun. Keeps my training consistent, and you don't burn your fingers if you try it at the range while training when the gun is warm...
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Old April 27, 2021, 07:01 AM   #12
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To an extent if using a red dot mounted on the rear of a pistol it can still be easier to use the front serrations even today. This can depend on how much if at all the optic overhangs the slide, how good are the rear serrations, and how tall is the optic (if you’re used to going overhand rather than pinching). Generally you can still use the rear serrations, it just becomes more awkward. The optic ready version of the CZ Shadow 2 doesn’t have rear serrations. I have never had front serrations tear up my holster, but my holsters are kydex.


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Old April 27, 2021, 09:07 AM   #13
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Quote:
Originally Posted by TunnelRat View Post
I get that front serrations are more forward than rear serrations, hence the names, but I fail to see how using them requires a palm to be in front of the muzzle at any point.


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Most people are right handed. Right handed shooters tend to use the strong hand to hold the pistol, the left hand to operate the slide. With rear serrations, the shoots tend to reach over with thumb and fingers of the left hand to operate the slide...thus putting their elbow very close to the muzzle. With forward serrations, those same shooters pinch the serrations with the thumb and fingers of the left hand, putting their palm in front, or nearly so, of the muzzle. It may not be correct gun handling, but I have seen many shooters doing it.
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Old April 27, 2021, 09:16 AM   #14
TunnelRat
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Front serrations in semi-automatics?

Quote:
Originally Posted by dahermit View Post
Most people are right handed. Right handed shooters tend to use the strong hand to hold the pistol, the left hand to operate the slide. With rear serrations, the shoots tend to reach over with thumb and fingers of the left hand to operate the slide...thus putting their elbow very close to the muzzle. With forward serrations, those same shooters pinch the serrations with the thumb and fingers of the left hand, putting their palm in front, or nearly so, of the muzzle. It may not be correct gun handling, but I have seen many shooters doing it.

That’s a bizarre way to use front serrations imo, and seems awkward. All you have to do is reach forward with your support hand and pinch the slide between your thumb and fingers, then pull to the rear (similar to the pinch method with rear serrations). No part of your hand or arm has to be in front of the pistol, much less in front of the muzzle.


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Old April 27, 2021, 10:08 AM   #15
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Quote:
chrisintexas What are/is the purpose of front serrations in semi-automatics?
Marketing, because people see them on other pistols and want them......

Quote:
44 AMP Front serrations on slides date from the 80s into the 90s, where they were popular on the race guns of the era.....
Just like the grooves on the front of Glock frames. In the '70's and early '80's it was popular for custom 1911 smiths to square and/or checker the front of the trigger guard for your support hand to wrap around. That technique disappeared by the '90's.....but Glock and other kept doing it.

There are some gruesome photos of numbskulls using that type of grip on a revolver. (they forget about the cylinder gap)
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Old April 27, 2021, 11:21 AM   #16
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Marketing gimmick. I have a couple guns with them, of no use what-so-ever. Same-Same full length guide rods.
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Old April 27, 2021, 12:56 PM   #17
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If you have your finger on the trigger while you are doing anything but firing, you have bigger problems than front slide serrations.

My first handgun purchase was a CZ style pistol with the slide in the frame. I read about less real estate for gripping the slide so I saw extra serrations as a bonus. Once in hand, I never used the front serrations. There is a chamber peep hole, but it's hard to see. If I press check, it's from the rear with a slight pull....trigger finger firmly on the frame.
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Old April 27, 2021, 01:01 PM   #18
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I don't use front slide serrations, don't see a use for them since so many pistols have loaded chamber indicators, but at the same time have no objections towards them, nor do I see them as detrimental in any way.
Sure, someone could hurt themselves if they're not handling the firearm safely, but it's not like they encourage unsafe handling.
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Old April 27, 2021, 01:45 PM   #19
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Just another gimmick to sell more guns.
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Old April 27, 2021, 02:58 PM   #20
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I've had guns with and without front slide serrations. I really didn't notice any difference either way.
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Old April 27, 2021, 07:27 PM   #21
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To sell training providing the best ways to employ front serrations?
I cringe every time I see someone reach toward the muzzle to load the gun, then do it again to press check, then do it again to unload the gun, when there's no need to.
I have seen more than a few instances of people sweeping themselves as they execute a tap/rack.
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Old April 27, 2021, 08:43 PM   #22
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Useless as tits on a boar hog............gimmick.
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Old April 27, 2021, 10:39 PM   #23
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I hate forward cocking serrations for all the reasons mentioned.

Here’s something else that I hate: “press checks”

If you NEED your pistol to be loaded and you honestly don’t know or can’t remember, you have problems that desperately need to be addressed.

If your need pistol clear, empty, unloaded then cracking the slide a small percentage is a horrendous way to ensure clear. Open the pistol fully, be certain.

If you are competing in a sanctioned event, you get ordered by the RSO to load and make ready. You don’t need a press check here. If you are carrying for duty or defense, why (and how?) would your pistol ever have been unloaded? Didn’t you load your carry gun? Has it been out of your control? If you say yes to any of these, your process for carrying a loaded handgun needs work.
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Old April 27, 2021, 11:20 PM   #24
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We beat the topic of press checks to death over many pages. I’m not sure we need to go down that road again.

https://thefiringline.com/forums/sho...d.php?t=604985


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Old April 28, 2021, 12:12 AM   #25
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I like front serrations, particularly on compact pistols with their short slides. Body fluids including sweat and blood can make slides mighty slick.
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