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Old December 13, 2016, 01:12 PM   #1
taymag
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USPSA club sign up questions

So I went to sign up for my first practice shoot and it has a couple questions which I haven't a clue what to put.

I am familiar with some, but during a practice shoot do these actually matter? Anyway, here they are...

Division (Production, limited, etc)
Class (GM, M, A, etc)
Power Factor (Major, Minor)
Category (Junior, Senior, LEO, etc)

Basically for now I just want to show up and shoot. I probably wont shoot my reloads (so just factory ammo) and I will be shooting a factory Glock 17 if that info helps
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Old December 13, 2016, 01:23 PM   #2
T. O'Heir
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I think they classify you according to the firearm and calibre you shoot. Read this.
https://www.uspsa.org/uspsa-rules.php
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Old December 13, 2016, 05:05 PM   #3
RickB
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Divisions are intended to separate guns of different types, so that the competitor, rather than the equipment, is the determining factor in scoring.
Since reloading is such an important aspect of USPSA competition, guns with limited magazine capacity do not compete in the same divisions as guns with higher capacity.
Same for optical sights vs. iron sights.
Your G17 best fits in Production division, but if you want to stoke the magazines to capacity you'll have to shoot in Limited, where the minor-power scoring of 9mm hurts you relative to those "making major" and getting more points on target.
Classification is a measure of relative skill, and you can gauge your progress as a shooter by regularly shooting classifier courses-of-fire and classifier matches.
In my area, there's a classifier stage, at least one, at every match, so if you shoot regularly you can track your improvement through your classification percentage (essentially, how your shooting compares to the very best shooters who'd rate 100%).
Some people fly through the classes, going from D to Master in a year, while others can take years to improve; the more time, energy, and money you devote to improving, the faster and farther you'll go.
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Old December 13, 2016, 06:11 PM   #4
taymag
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RickB, you seem knowledgeable, what do you think about this...

On another forum a member suggested running Limited so I could run a full mag. Considering I will semi-suck either way and will care less about my score for a few matches, would I have more fun in the limited division? After all its about fun, I would hope.
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Old December 13, 2016, 08:59 PM   #5
Jim Watson
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I see a number of new and casual shooters entering Limited/Minor so they don't have to reload so often. They are not winning anyhow, so that lets them concentrate on the shooting and movement.

If you are still shooting USPSA and still using that Glock in a year, buy some more magazines and go to Production. By then your shooting and match management will be pretty good, you will have a classification, and you will be competitive in the Division tailored to your gun.
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Old December 13, 2016, 09:43 PM   #6
taymag
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Alright, that's the plan then! Thanks
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Old December 14, 2016, 10:52 AM   #7
9x45
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Maytag, there is way way more going on in competition than just what division you decide to compete in. First you are not a member of USPSA, so you are not classified, therefore U for unclassified. A G17 fits into Production (all scored minor floor) or Limited (all scored major floor, which is less points for B,C and D hits). For the same shooting performance, you are going to score higher in Production. And it's points earned (less penalties) divided by time, called hit factor. Highest HF takes %100 of the stage, even if they didn't get all the points. Limited also allows you to position your mags in front of you hip bone. Category is a kinda of identification sub category, really has nothing to do with performance, except it is noted on the overall, such as high LEO, or high senior. So get a good gun belt, like a Wilderness Tactical, and a good holster and mag pouches, like the BladeTech Revolutions, 5 mags, and about 200 rounds. Check with the match director, some clubs require an orientation prior to competing. Also note that if the match is USPSA practice, it may not be a sanctioned USPSA match, check USPSA.com for club listings. You will be squadded with experienced shooters the first several times out, and you can ask the RO for help during the course of fire. Shoot fast, have fun.
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Old December 14, 2016, 12:23 PM   #8
RickB
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Quote:
RickB, you seem knowledgeable, what do you think about this...

On another forum a member suggested running Limited so I could run a full mag. Considering I will semi-suck either way and will care less about my score for a few matches, would I have more fun in the limited division? After all its about fun, I would hope.
I'd recommend shooting Production.
One of the most important aspects of shooting USPSA is deciding the best way to approach each course of fire; direction of movement, target engagement order, when and where to reload, etc.
Watching experienced shooters who are in the "same boat" as you; minor power factor, 10-round capacity, will help your learning curve.
Most people shooting in Limited will have 20-round capacity, and will be shooting major, so you will see people making choices that won't necessarily translate to 17rds/minor.
I shot almost nothing but Limited 10 for fifteen years, and strategizing around reloads was half the fun.
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Old December 14, 2016, 02:55 PM   #9
taymag
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Makes sense. Regardless or what route I go I will try them both out within a month. I see your points and it seems like counting the targets in each section of the stage and planning the reload would be half the fun.

I did find that cool/interesting when I watched my first match, I didn't even realize people were running 10rd mags for some reason cause I was just taking it all in and it was still interesting to see one guy reload here and start there and the other guy that seemed to be of similar skill level go a totally different route on when to reload and engage what.

Anyway, thanks again!
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