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Old July 15, 2018, 05:32 PM   #12
dahermit
Senior Member
 
Join Date: October 28, 2006
Location: South Central Michigan...near
Posts: 5,815
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your goal is not clear. Do you want top accuracy for the purpose of hunting or top accuracy for the purpose of target shooting? A target bullet is not a hunting bullet. Target bullets are generally made in weights appropriate for that purpose. Hunting bullets are made in various weights as to accommodate the intended game animal (e.g., small Southern deer as opposed to Elk and Moose, etc.).
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I find a lot of error in the above statement.
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First accuracy as more to do with twist and weight than the exact bullet type. You can certainly get under 1 inch with many hunting bullets if you reload.
Having tested several brands of made for target shooting and several styles intended for of hunting of the same brands, I find that in at least consistency in weight, bullets intended for target purposes demonstrated to be more consistent as well as over-all more accurate in performance (tighter groups) than hunting bullets. In sum, a hunting bullet is not a target bullet and vice versa. There are subtle features of some hunting bullets that add problematic elements not necessarily conducive to accuracy. Exposed bullet noses, internal bands (Hornady Interloc), internal jacket grooves, jackets thinned towards the front, etc., all are features that can make it more difficult to make uniform bullets. A target bullet, on the other hand, need only be a basic cup and draw, with no terminal performance gimmicks that ad to the bullet complexity at the cost of uniformity.
Note: when discussing "Bench Rest" (A.K.A. Target) accuracy, one-inch groups are on the large side.
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