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Eyes of I
June 7, 2012, 02:21 PM
Howdy, the issue I have come upon is what general purpose, frequent shooting rifle would be a good fit for myself. The rifle will be used for general target shooting at distances from 25 to 200 yards normally and occasionally higher when conditions allow. I have considered hunting though this rifle will more than likely be a fun gun that I can consider a good "survival" rifle and defensible if push come to shove (though doubtful as I have a small cache of 12 and 20 gauges as well as handguns). I Have looked at everything from Ruger Mini-Thirties to ak's to Savage .308's and .357 lever AND bolt actions and have come to the conclusion that I need outside advice. Price range up to $650. Any help would be appreciated.

jmr40
June 7, 2012, 02:31 PM
For me it would be a medium weight stainless/synthetic bolt gun chambered in 308. At that price limit this one if hunting were high on the list.

http://ruger.com/products/m77HawkeyeAllWeather/models.html

If SD were more important, I'd look hard at one of the budget AR's. Might have a hard time coming in at $650, but you should be able to do it under $700.

Even the budget AR's are a much better rifle and are priced less than the Mini-14's right now.

I think everyone should own at least 1 lever rifle, but from a practical perspective they don't really do anything as well as a bolt or semi auto.

Crow Hunter
June 7, 2012, 02:57 PM
There is really no such thing as "general purpose" when it comes to tools.

You can get one that applies to a certain "range" of circumstances/uses.

First you will need to define that primary range.

A rifle good for shooting elk at 300 yards will not be good for CQB and it won't be the best for target shooting from a bench at 600 yards.

Get a better definition of what your 85% use is going to be and choose a rifle based on that rather than trying to cover too many bases at once.

Eyes of I
June 7, 2012, 03:08 PM
Thank you for the suggestion on the Ruger 77, I had looked at them but cannot find anyone with experience with them in the area I live in. As I stated originally, the normal range will be relatively close from 25-200 yards on a normal basis as that is what I'd feel comfortable shooting game sized targets at with minimal power scopes and/or irons.

Crow Hunter
June 7, 2012, 04:04 PM
game sized targets

Please define this.

Rabbits?

Deer?

Moose?

Elephants?

All are "game sized", not all rifle calibers would be effective.;)

Brian Pfleuger
June 7, 2012, 04:15 PM
I'm in the early stages of a rebarrel project on a Savage 11.

I keep digging and researching and reading.

I've never been much of a fan of the 243Win but all my research and questions keep bringing me back to it.

When I consider all the factors... Brass availability, bullet selection, dies available, load data, barrel life, performance on everything from paper to woodchucks to deer, recoil...

I keep ending up back at the 243.

hooligan1
June 7, 2012, 04:19 PM
Gunsite Scout with a twenty rnd mag, would be a choice for you. I myself kinda like a short (22 inch) barrel on my go to rifle, Savage 110 in .270/30-06.

gkdir
June 7, 2012, 05:12 PM
A good quality .308 or 30.06 will do any and all, of what you want. Plenty of accuracy, plenty of ammo, plenty of models to choose from.Your price range will easily get you into a quality used rifle with decent glass. Be patient--there is a world of excellent rifles out their for sale. You really need to define your primary "need" for this rifle. 25yds at a deer is not CQC, nor is 200yds at a yote the same as what is used for TSHTF. If you are gonna be a paper puncher then maybe get ya a model 10 HBR Savage in .308. Then if you want to go afield with it later, it will be very well suited for varmint shooting, a bit heavy for "walking around", but well suited for a deer stand. Get rid of any "Rambo" thoughts you might entertain, and concentrate on being a "rifleman". When you successfully master that, then it won't make any difference what rifle you have in your hand. Good luck in your choice.
G

BIG P
June 7, 2012, 06:39 PM
A friend let me shoot his new T/C venture in 25-06 the other day.I was really surprized its a pretty nice rifle for the money.shot around 1moa with box ammo.

tahunua001
June 7, 2012, 07:14 PM
I notice for the most part that you are looking at 30 cal rifles? is there any particular reason you are excluding the 22-30 cal options? I am a fan of the 243 myself as a general purpose round. it takes a 308 case and necks it down from 7.62MM to 6MM which gives a much flatter trajectory over greater ranges and gives a 100 grain bullet a very respectful velocity of about 2400 FPS in most factory ammo. 243 is great for blackbear, wild hogs, whitetail deer and coyotes, which just about sums up the majority of virginia big game hunts. if I recall correctly, virginia has no restrictions on centerfire weapons for hunting so from a legal perspective you should be fine with anything above 22LR. 243 is most commonly a bolt action round so your average weatherby vanguard, remington 700 or ruger M77 should all fall into your budget. if you're looking for semi autos bushmaster and DPMS make AR10s in 243 but they are nearly double your budget

Eyes of I
June 7, 2012, 09:47 PM
I apologize for any lack of description issues. I am still new to forums and need to remember I'm not able to speak in relative terms. I had mainly considered .30 calibers simply because they make for a logical close quaters to medium (300 yards) distance round with plenty of lethality for whitetail and the cheaper local ammo for .308, .30-06, .30-30 and .357 mag. More than likely this rifle will spend 95% of the time punching paper and steel but with my current job I may be able to make some attempts at deer season as well. I appreciation all the advice so far as I'm a fairly new shooter and only have expierence with shotguns and handguns so far (about to pick up new m&p 40, woot!).

TexAg
June 7, 2012, 10:28 PM
My general purpose rifle is a (slightly) older synthetic stock Remington 700 ADL .30-06 with iron sights. I put Talley Quick Release rings on it with a 2.5-8x Leupold in them. To me, a GP rifle should have two sighting systems with back up irons the preference for the second sighting system. It's not much for close quarters, but take the scope off and it would do for a shot or two in a pinch.

tahunua001
June 7, 2012, 10:41 PM
for the record, buying a gun because of cheaper ammo is a bad idea. a lot of guys started buying guns chambered in 30 tokarev because the ammo was less than 10 cents a round but in the course of 6 months the ammo went up to 30 cents a round because of poor supply but large demand.

that 30-30, 30-06, 357 and, 308 is not going to remain cheap forever(especially the 308).

if you're looking for something that still has the stopping power to drop a 150+ pound deer out to 200 yards then you may want to take 357 off the table. I've witnessed 30-30 make a 200 yard kill shot on a 200 pound white tail and 308 is essentially a rimless 30-30 with a little higher velocity and a little flatter trajectory so I would say that for your purposes a 308 would do the trick quite well. the ruger M77, remington 700 and weatherby vanguard all come in 308.

amprecon
June 8, 2012, 12:30 AM
If I had to pick one rifle for most of the uses I could forsee, it would be my RRA LAR-6 A4 Mid-Length in 6.8spc. It is short, handy, relatively light, hi-cap, optics-friendly and has been reliable and accurate and could take most game in North America within its range.

http://i860.photobucket.com/albums/ab167/amprecon/011.jpg

Buzzcook
June 8, 2012, 12:48 AM
Get an AR-15 in .223, if you decide to hunt larger game get an upper in an appropriate cartridge.

jimbob86
June 8, 2012, 01:12 AM
There is really no such thing as "general purpose" when it comes to tools.


Horsefeathers.

While it may not be ideal for every task and completely inapropriate for some, there are general purpose tools: a camp hatchet would be one......

For a gp rifle, Jeff Cooper's Scout Rifle Concept was as close to GP as I have seen.....

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Scout_rifle

Ruger makes something very close to Coopers idea, though they want $999 for it..... Cabela's had them for around $850 las I looked...

http://ruger.com/products/gunsiteScoutRifle/models.html

In your price range, Palmetto State Armory sells AR kits and stripped lowers (some assembly required- you could use some gp hand tools like a 16 oz. hammer, a brass drift, a scratch awl, a med flat screwdriver, some duct tape and a pair of vise-grips to put it together, though more specialized tools would likely yield better results).

jimbob86
June 8, 2012, 01:17 AM
2.5-8x Leupold ....... It's not much for close quarters,

2.5x should work fine for close work ....learn to shoot with both eyes open..... so long as your head is in the same place on the every time, and the comb height is right, you should be able to look at the target and bring the gun up to your face and the croshairs should be on the target, if the gun is set up right.

Burner
June 8, 2012, 01:40 AM
2.5-8x Leupold ....... It's not much for close quarters,
That will work fine. Tons of people rocked 3 and 4 power ACOGs for years before they started throwing the micro red dots on top. If you've ever shot a target really close that is moving and time is important, I think you'll find not much aiming is actually going on.

Also, to OP, any Arsenal AK-47 will do and be perfect for just about everything short of long range hunting. You're not going Contrary to popular belief mounting optics isn't a bother, just get a rail that locks into the side rail. Also contrary to popular belief, the inherent accuracy of the AK platform is fine in well manufactured examples - especially Arsenals. Ergonomics are very favorable and the stock folds which is very nice when you want to pack it.

I can't say it enough times - Arsenal AK-47. It is a treat.

chadio
June 8, 2012, 06:30 AM
If I had to pick one rifle for most of the uses I could forsee, it would be my RRA LAR-6 A4 Mid-Length in 6.8spc. It is short, handy, relatively light, hi-cap, optics-friendly and has been reliable and accurate and could take most game in North America within its range.

Now THAT is cool - a bit out of the OP price range, but a neat rifle anyway.

Crow Hunter
June 8, 2012, 08:19 AM
Horsefeathers.

I say Horsefeathers to your Horsefeathers.:D

While it may not be ideal for every task and completely inapropriate for some, there are general purpose tools: a camp hatchet would be one......

You just restated exactly what I said while saying Horsefeathers.:confused:

A camp hatchet would be a good "general purpose" tool for the range of camping activities. It wouldn't be "general purpose" for other activities. Like tightening a nut or doing plumbing work or shooting white tail deer.;)

You can't buy a single tool to cover every instance in which it might need to be used. You have to define what you are going to do with it 1st and pick a tool that is the "best fit" for your primary uses. If you decide you are going to work on something do you just go and grab a random tool or do you get the tool that is most appropriate for the job?

I guess we have different defintions of "general purpose".

ETA:

I was wrong. I retract my Horsefeathers comment.:D

If you go by the internet definition of "general purpose" then you are right. If it has a broad set of uses, then it can be defined as "general purpose". In my own version of English, "general purpose" means that it is useful for "everything". :o

I still stand by by original point though. There is no tool that can "do it all". The job will define the most useful tool and the OP should choose a rifle that fits his 85% usage and he will be much happier and more effective.

Te Anau
June 8, 2012, 08:53 AM
For me it would be a medium weight stainless/synthetic bolt gun chambered in 308.
+1

jimbob86
June 8, 2012, 12:38 PM
In my own version of English, "general purpose" means that it is useful for "everything".


Would that be the Crow Huntish Dialect?

Nothing is optimum for all situations, Thus "Horsefeathers" (aka "Nonesuch, "Unicorn Blood", etc.) ..... the more specialized the the tool, the less usefull it will be outside it's specialty......

""The general-purpose rifle will do equally well for all but specialized hunting, as well as for fighting; thus it must be powerful enough to kill any living target of reasonable size. If you insist upon a definition of 'reasonable size,' let us introduce an arbitrary mass figure of about 1,000 lb." -Jeff Cooper

I would add that a GP rifle is also incapable of sustained suppressive fire, but that is not properly done with an individual rifle, in any case- that role would be done by a crew-served automatic weapon...... and suppressive fire is not really an option for an individual without the support of a Government level Supply Chain ........

I still stand by by original point though. There is no tool that can "do it all".

Agreed.

The job will define the most useful tool and the OP should choose a rifle that fits his 85% usage and he will be much happier and more effective.

Also Agreed.

The only problem is that reality is not like HALO or CoD: you can't just tap a button and have a more task-suitable weapon appear from a list: you can only carry so much, and packing a sniper rifle, a sub-gun, a battle rifle, a rocket launcher and fodder for all those is just not going to happen outside of a video game ...... you can have a whole collection of guns, but one is all you can use at a time. If one is all you have.... your "go to" rifle should be able to do everything you need to do..... thus the "GP" rifle.

Crow Hunter
June 8, 2012, 02:15 PM
The only problem is that reality is not like HALO or CoD: you can't just tap a button and have a more task-suitable weapon appear from a list: you can only carry so much, and packing a sniper rifle, a sub-gun, a battle rifle, a rocket launcher and fodder for all those is just not going to happen outside of a video game ...... you can have a whole collection of guns, but one is all you can use at a time. If one is all you have.... your "go to" rifle should be able to do everything you need to do..... thus the "GP" rifle.

I wasn't stating or trying to imply that it was. Sorry if you mistook me.

I was, however, trying to coax the primary usage for the rifle out of a very vague and open ended question by stating there isn't an answer. More details are needed to narrow down the focus.

A Cooper'esque Scout Rifle, while it has very broad applications just about anywhere in the world, will not be (IMHO) much fun for a new rifle shooter to punch paper with at the range and practice his personal defensive tactics that "might" be used for hunting some undefined game animal.

If his needs don't fit Cooper's needs for a GP rifle, he may have a different "general purpose". Hence my comment that there is no such thing as a "general purpose" tool.

While I am wrong about the direct definition of "GP", I am not wrong in the context. "General Purpose" has to fit within a range of needs. If he buys a rifle that kicks too hard, has expensive ammo, and is difficult for him to use, such that it lanquishes in the back of his gun safe forever, it becomes "Generally Useless.":D

BigMikey76
June 8, 2012, 02:49 PM
There is no tool that can "do it all". The job will define the most useful tool and the OP should choose a rifle that fits his 85% usage and he will be much happier and more effective.

I think this statement sums it up pretty well. "General purpose" can mean many different things. A 16 oz hammer is a GP tool that will work for many pounding related chores, but it is sorely lacking if you need to fix a computer. Likewise, a jewler's screwdriver or small soldering iron that might work well for the computer won't drive a nail very well.

Determining the task that will most commonly need to be accomplished is the key to finding which GP tool will provide the best service... Will it be a hunting rifle, or is it likely to see only range use? Self/home defense? Long range target competition or brush hunting quick shots?

I can't think of any "one gun" that will fill all of these niches equally, but identifying the main purpose and allowing for secondary or tertiary needs can be done as long as the needs are reasonably identified.

To get back to the question at hand, though, the OP stated:

More than likely this rifle will spend 95% of the time punching paper and steel but with my current job I may be able to make some attempts at deer season as well.

Any rifle can punch paper, with the smaller ones allowing longer sessions with less pain, but the addition of deer as a secondary usage narrows the field a bit. I would recommend a .243 bolt action. Light recoil means paper punching will still be fun and not leave you sore the next day, and it has enough chutzpah to take a deer when you need it to.

Just remember, though: my advice is only worth what you paid for it ;)

tahunua001
June 8, 2012, 02:56 PM
um....when did a general purpose plinker/hunter/home defense rifle question turn into what can lay down enough suppression fire? last time I was in Virginia, the paper targets and feral pigs didn't have machine gun nests the the average punk breaking into your home doesn't pack an uzi and a AK47. you have to remember that a Nebraskan's definition of general purpose rifle is going to vary greatly from an Alaskan's definition. a 243, 257(roberts and weatherby), 6.5 grendel, 6.8 SPC, 7mm-08, 30-30, 308, 30-06, 7.62x54R, and 303(british and savage) are all going to fit the OP's definition of general purpose very well. he doesn't need a night vision holographic scope on his phased plasma rifle with 40 watt range. he needs a gun that can put a hole in paper at 25 yards just as well as it can drop a coyote at 200 yards and if he absolutely has to drop an intruder from across his living room.

I might be completely wrong but that is is about as general purpose as it gets and an AK47, 10/22, 357 lever action, Barrett 50 cal, and 12 gauge pump gun do not fit those criteria at all, a medium to lightweight bolt action rifle in any of the aforementioned calibers fits the bill exceedingly well.

TexAg
June 8, 2012, 05:38 PM
^+1
I think he layed it out pretty well. The OP didn't say small game and he didn't say elephants and he didn't say suppressive fire. If you do intend to truely shoot much at 200-300 yards I'd take .30-30 and .357 off the list (7.62x39 as well), especially for a new rifle shooter. .243, .308 and .30-06 are ubiquitous, and usually you can find a cheap box of hunting bullets anywhere. Basically you're looking at bolt guns and (I think this could fit your bill quite nicely) Remington Pumps (760, 7600) in your price range. I think Savage has a couple of current guns with iron sights and the pump guns do have them. If you look at used guns your options will open up a bit as irons were included on many older models. Now that's IF you want irons, which is something I consider mandatory on a GP rifle and, as you said a "survival" rifle.

Eyes of I
June 8, 2012, 07:58 PM
I am really getting a kick out of the rabbit holes these threads inevitably seem to go through...supressive firing and hot hunting in the same thread. I mentioned .357 simply because up unto 150 yards the calculated kinetic energy out of a 18 inch barrel is the same as a .223 which to me is pretty crazy...and I already have a blackhawk on the list. I had thought maybe to lean towards a savage hog hunter...plenty of calibers, good price (buds has them for 350?) And has irons which I have as a must....any experience with savage rifles? Or any other ideas? I do appreciate all the feedback from everyone

tahunua001
June 8, 2012, 11:56 PM
I have no experience with savages but walmart has savage rifles in 30-06 for about $350 most of the time, I've never looked at the model numbers simply because I have no need of another bolt action but one of those might work well. also another gun for a person on a budget is the ruger american rifle which should also come in 308 and 30-06 and is about the same price and so far gets very high marks in all of the reviews I've read here at TFL.

bamaranger
June 9, 2012, 01:07 AM
The reference to Coopers scout rifle is apt, but many folks find the "scout scope" not for them. Take the IER scope out of the equation and replace with a conventional compact 4x (I like fixed powers) and the rest of the concept is still viable. A short, light weight, bolt rifle with adaptable shooting sling and back up sights. Cooper liked .308 ( so do I) as a GP caliber but the OP makes reference to whitetails only so .243 would work for him.

A Savage scout or the new Hoghunter would be a good start.

Auto426
June 9, 2012, 01:27 AM
I would personally spend a little more time saving up. $650 won't go very far for a single "do-all" rifle.

IMO, if I were to pick a single rifle that would be able to cover almost anything I could need it for it would be something like the new Colt LE901. That gun would provide .308 power for hunting, semi-automatic function and compact size for self defense, and the ability to swap uppers for economical practice in a cheaper caliber, like a 5.45x39, 5.56mm, or .22lr. The full length monolith upper makes mounting any type of optic you want very easy, and the free floated barrel should provide plenty of accuracy.

But, as the other said, if you want to keep prices down and are mainly thinking about hunting and paper punching a bolt gun in an economical caliber would work just fine. You also have to take a minute to consider your state's hunting laws, as some have restrictions of the minimum caliber and the magazine capacity.

iamdb
June 9, 2012, 01:30 AM
Marlin 336 as GP as it gets. :cool:

Burner
June 9, 2012, 02:23 AM
If the decidedly average external ballistics of the 7.62x39mm are a concern to you, Saiga or Vepr. In .308 or 7.62x54R.

Crow Hunter
June 9, 2012, 06:17 AM
You have to admit, rabbit holes are a lot of fun. Just look at Alice in Wonderland.:D

Sorry for getting you off track.

I have owned 2 savage rifles and my brother owns one now. I liked them a lot. All of them were very accurate and I really liked where the safety was.

I have a friend who has a .243 110 Predator that he doesn't like now that he has taken it hunting a couple of times. He says it is too barrel heavy and he wants to sell it. I don't know how it compares to the Hog Hunter though.

As I have gotten older, I have gotten a lot less enthusiastic about getting smacked around by recoil. Especially considering the limited amount of big game hunting that I do now. I do mostly field target shooting (no benches, around the farm shooting) and predator hunting, and "tacticool" training, so I tend to use ARs in .223.

I would ask some friends about trying out their rifles or renting some if they are available if you can, particularly if you are a new shooter. You don't want to plunk down your money and find out that the rifle kicks too much/doesn't fit right/shoots ammo that you can't find or is too expensive/too heavy and then you have to try to get rid of it and no one wants to buy it or you take too much of a hit on a trade. (My buddy's experience with his Savage)

tahunua001
June 9, 2012, 09:16 AM
I would ask some friends about trying out their rifles or renting some if they are available if you can, particularly if you are a new shooter. You don't want to plunk down your money and find out that the rifle kicks too much/doesn't fit right/shoots ammo that you can't find or is too expensive/too heavy and then you have to try to get rid of it and no one wants to buy it or you take too much of a hit on a trade. (My buddy's experience with his Savage)
+1, it is always a good idea to test drive before you buy. another person's preferences may not necessarily match your own so all the gun forum advice in the world can only go so far before it hits a brick wall.

carprivershooter
June 10, 2012, 10:19 AM
I have read many of the post here. Tools can have a range of things they can do. A pocket knife can do a lot of different things, it is not the best tool to use in field dressing a deer but it can be done. I own several adjustable wrenches because they serve a several purposes, I also own a set of wenches and sockets they can do the same things as my wenches and socket just do it better. One rifle to do a lot of things well is possible. 30-06 is a good gun has the range out 200 yards. you can plink with it, for me my shoulder would get sore. For me I think a 30-30 would be close to fitting the general purpose rifle, It was for a lot of men for a lot of years. for me it's my 44 mag lever action. this is just my opinion, no better no worse then other presented here.

chucknbach
June 12, 2012, 11:29 PM
My GP rifle is a .243. For me it kills everything from deer on down. Inside of 200 yds I'd use it for......well everything.

ltc444
June 12, 2012, 11:45 PM
Since you have a "hoard" of pistols and shotguns you have covered your close in SD needs. A shotgun with slugs is good to 100 yds or so.

Since you are looking to shoot mostly targets with maybe some hunting you should look at a medium weight bolt gun which with scope should weigh between 9 and ten pounds. You might want to look at the weight limits for Metallic silhouette competition. These are fun shoots. I like the 9 to 10 pounds as it is not to heavy to carry on a hunt but not to light to shoot repeatedly on the range.

As to cartridge, 308 and 30-06 are probably the most versatile and available rounds in the US. These cartridges are come in a variety of bullet weights which allow you to shoot light bullets for prairie dogs up to Elk using the heavier bullets designed for large game.

The 243/6mm would also be a good choice. These rounds would allow you to go with a lighter rifle as the recoil is not as heavy as the 30caliber rounds. You are limited on the upper end of the game spectrum. They are good for white tail deer.

The 223/5.56 are good for varmints but not adequate for heavier animals.

My personal favorite round is the 257 Roberts. As a re loader I have the option to tailor my loads for their intended purpose and the rifle. Granted I will NEVER use this round on Elk. I have found the Roberts to be pleasant to shoot and very accurate. It is more economical to shoot than the other 25s.

In making your choice I have all ways felt that a proper fit is the most important factor in choosing any weapon. I purchased a Win Mod 70 in 338 win Mag because it fit. At the time I had no use for the round, but it worked for me.

Despite modern manufacturing techniques there are variations in the fit of each rifle. Try everyone on the rack and select the rifle that fits you in the caliber you select.

Good luck and enjoy.

CCCLVII
June 14, 2012, 09:27 AM
I have a Ruger 77/44 and I think I could use it on any thing from Dogs to Bear. It would be too much for squirrel and rabbit and not enough for Africa but it fits pretty well in the middle.

The other down side is that it is not great at long distances. There is a lot of drop with those heavier bullets.

603Country
June 14, 2012, 11:05 AM
Eyes, the very first response to your question was the perfect answer. All I'd add to what jmr40 said would be that you might consider a compact rifle, like a Remington Model 7 or a Ruger 77 Compact (or Savage if they have one). And yes, in 308 and in stainless with a synthetic stock. That's about as GP as it gets. It'd be light, easy to handle, rust resistant, and will shoot from here to yonder and be good for game in the range of mouse to moose. And just about every Bubba Hardware store in 'normal' states will have ammo.

Rustle in the Bushes
June 15, 2012, 02:04 AM
General purpose for you- .308. Not a specific hunting gun, .308 is what you want for the range and can be used for the real world also.

Youre thinking survival gun so I would go with a sako A7, tikka t3, browning x bolt(synthetic), or a weatherby vanguard all under 1,000$. All synthetic.



Youre primarily shooting at the range Id go for the tikka or the sako theyll prolly be the most accurate.

tahunua001
June 15, 2012, 01:05 PM
^ except for the Sako and Browning come in over the OPs budget and the Tikka leaves him no room in the wallet for optics.

you do realize that Vanguards are guaranteed to be sub MOA right? what makes a Tikka or Sako(both rebranded Berettas anyway) more necessary for use as a range/hunting gun?

Old Time Hunter
June 16, 2012, 09:37 AM
Winchester '94 Timber Carbine chambered for the .444 Marlin, good for anything from squirrels to elephants depending on how you load it...'nuff said.

Will knock tin cans off a fence post at 250 yards with peep sights when I do my part.

Al Den
June 16, 2012, 01:11 PM
You might consider the concept of the "scout rifle" mentioned most especially. Ruger makes one. Savage does in their 10 FCM is it? Browning's takedown lever has a scout scope mount and 5-round removable mags up to .308 (I'd love one, and then get it Magnaported). Steyr's I think was the one Cooper recommended/designed. There's the CoPilot custom lever for the bush. Remington's 7600P could be forward scope mounted, same for their 7615P -- these are short-barreled police pump-action rifles (the latter uses AR-15 mags).

Need a semi? Springfield's SOCOM II (is it?) maybe...

bulldawg1024
June 17, 2012, 08:15 AM
you can build a nice ar for 650 that would do what you are talking about.

swampcrawler
June 17, 2012, 08:41 AM
I'm a huge believer in the "every day rifle". Meaning its with me every day and fired nearly every day. I dug around for quite a while trying to find what would fit the bill for pretty much the same requirements you have and came up with 2 choices. One was the tikka stainless/synthetic in .223 due to its exceptional bolt feel and accuracy at its price point and the cheapness/availability of the ammom and if the SHTF, everybody and their uncle will be using an AR platform which means .223 ammo EVERYWHERE(I think). That with a 1-4, fixed 4, or 2-7 scope would be great.
The other option was the cz 527 carbine in either .223 or 7.62x39. The rifle is short, light, fairly accurate, and just handles nicely, even if the bolt feel is rather rough. Its just so easy for it to live behind the seat of my truck in a leather scabard and be deployed quickly to vaporize an armadillo or what have you. I went with the cz due to its compactness and my personal affection for the x39 cartrige. I believe those 2 rifles and calibers would do very nicely in your sittuation.

Justice06RR
June 18, 2012, 10:45 PM
you will get a hundred different responses, but IMO the AR platform is the best one to go with as a general purpose rifle. Simply because you can choose any caliber you want, add any accessories, and most calibers are readily available esp if you go with 5.56/.223/7.62 .

FALshootist
June 19, 2012, 06:57 AM
I've thought about this for some time as part of my "thinning the herd". Its unfortunate that neither the 6.8 nor the 6.5 Grendal really took off after what looked like a promising start.

An Ar 15 with 5.56 and 6.8 uppers could probably handle 90% of my uses. Along with a good .22 and maybe a used 30-06, all of my uses for a rifle would be covered.

But I don't reload, have no intention of starting and can't base my main rife on a cartridge of such limited distribution (I do know Wolf makes 6.5).

Lost River
June 24, 2012, 02:52 PM
The version of the "General purpose/all around practical rifle" that meets my needs.

I wanted to build an all around practical rifle for the nature of the things that I do. Living in the rural Rocky Mountain west, I have high deserts, thick northside timber and lots of rolling foothills, as well as very steep alpine terrain.

Given that I have hunted this country for 30+ years, (as well as recreate in it year round) I pretty well knew what I wanted when it came time to put together a "General purpose/all around practical rifle".

My all around practical rifle is a Tikka T3 Lite stainless in .308. I chopped the barrel to an even 20"s. It wears a 2.5-10x24 NightForce (NPR2), in a set of Talley lightweight rings.

Initially it wore a 4.5x14 Leupold, but I snagged it for another Tikka (custom 6mm rem).

I have a practical 2 point VTAC sling on it, same as my work rifle and personal ARs.

I have some 1/2 sized IPSC steel plates from MGM and have run my 20" Tikka out to 600. It is very easy to get first round hits at 600 with a good rest.

I have numerous Tikkas and have run a T3 308 Varmint for a number of years, so investing $$ in mags that I could use in multiple rifles made perfect sense.

Overall, it has proven to be an outstanding practical rifle.

Some pics:

http://i18.photobucket.com/albums/b109/IV_Troop/070-1.jpg

http://i18.photobucket.com/albums/b109/IV_Troop/PracticalTikka003.jpg

Lost River
June 24, 2012, 03:03 PM
These pics show it wearing a 4.5-14 Leupold, prior to being swapped out for the compact NightForce 2.5-10.

308 Tikkas have proven to be super accurate with my loads and very easy to shoot well. The detachable 5 round single stack mags have proven to be good quality and very reliable.

http://i18.photobucket.com/albums/b109/IV_Troop/LostRiverRangeOct08027-1.jpg

http://i18.photobucket.com/albums/b109/IV_Troop/001-2.jpg

With its fatter .308 brother:

http://i18.photobucket.com/albums/b109/IV_Troop/Tikka308s001.jpg


This last december I killed my elk with the little compact rifle. A single well placed round and the hunt was over.

http://i18.photobucket.com/albums/b109/IV_Troop/013-6.jpg

From Coyotes and Jackrabbits to Elk, this little rifle has proven to be a performer. Due to its light weight it is a joy to carry.

I have a number of other rifles that seem to get less and less field time since this little practical package was built.

Lost River
June 24, 2012, 03:16 PM
Hopefully this example from someone who has some field time will help you make a choice on what will meet YOUR needs.

Often on the net there seem to be a lot of suggestions from folks who never or rarely ever actually go afield. Years spent in the field will help shape your opinion on what you really need and don't need and you eventually will have no doubt. :)

Safe shooting.

Jack O'Conner
June 28, 2012, 08:39 PM
You can't go wrong with a Marlin 30-30.

Jack

http://i26.photobucket.com/albums/c146/rushmoreman/JFMarlin.jpg

dieselbeef
June 29, 2012, 06:43 AM
yepper

Edward429451
June 30, 2012, 12:42 AM
The AR with multiple uppers is a fine idea and you can add uppers later.

By my feeling is that you would have a more versatile (GP) round if you had a 30 cal as you're already thinking. Supressive fire aside, what wont the 30 cals do here in the States? 308, 30/30, 30/06...take your pick, they will all work so its preference in the 30 cal range. Vicious on paper, no Deer or Elk is safe, and could be used in a defensive role easily with realistic planning around it's limitations. IMO, 30 cals are as GP as it gets.

I keep ending up back at the 243.

This is interesting because the 243 has been an itch of mine for years now too. I had occasion to load for and shoot a friends wifes 243. I can't remember if it was a #1 or a #3, but it left a lasting impression on me. It was so easy to shoot well! It grouped good and seemingly never missed with it. Just a superb setup. It's the only 243 I've ever shot so I dunno if it was the round or the rifle that was so good. :D The ARs should have been 243s for the Military!

MOshooter65202
July 1, 2012, 06:42 AM
A lot of good choices for a "GP" rifle that have been pointed out throughout this thread.
My choices for a GP rifle would be one of my Colt AR15,Rem 700 bdl Rem 6mm.or maybe Rem 700 vssf 22-250?..Now for medium to large game my GP rifle is Rem 700 bdl 7mm rem mag or down in the brush I like to pack a DPMS LR308 AP4 carbine.

It all really depends on the general purpose to which the rifle will generally be used for?? varmint control,small game,medium to large game?