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View Full Version : Parts most prone to failure in a Glock


FlySubCompact
March 15, 2012, 01:43 PM
Owning this first Glock is turning from a "try out" situation to realizing that it is gonna be a "keeper".

I've read that Glocks are not prone to part failures, but seeing how the G23 is going to with me long term I'd like to lay back a few of the parts that do most often fail. Any suggestions from you long term Glock shooters? Thanks.

IMightBeWrong
March 15, 2012, 02:00 PM
The most likely part to fail is the round you put in it. If it's cheap crap, you could experience problems. If you feed it well, it will serve you well. Same can be said for just about anything. If something is going to fail, it's something that was out of spec and not caught by the factory.

barstoolguru
March 15, 2012, 02:09 PM
better ammo will cycle the slide/ eject better; more grains of powder

Double Naught Spy
March 15, 2012, 02:16 PM
In the .45 acp versions, it is the trigger return spring that seems to be problematic.

Silent Bob
March 15, 2012, 02:19 PM
I have owned a number of Glocks over the years and have shot tens of thousands of rounds through them. In my experience the two parts most likely to break are the trigger spring and the slide lock spring. In fact, these are the only parts I have had break shooting Glocks. The slide lock springs in the 9mm Glocks used to be thinner and more prone to breakage, but they have beefed up that spring in recent years. I would also want a spare recoil spring assembly and a handful of spare magazine springs.

The spring cups (of which there are two) can be easily lost during diassembly/reassembly of the striker assembly, so it wouldn't hurt to have a couple of spares of those if you plan on disassembling that assembly often.

In the .40/.357 Glocks I have heard of broken locking block pins and cracked locking blocks, I have never experienced that and assume it would take some rounds to get to that point.

NWPilgrim
March 15, 2012, 02:22 PM
First off I have not had any GLock parts fail after many thousands of rounds.

BUT, eventually every part of any machine will fail.

Springs obviously will wear out so even if they don't fail they can weaken. I have spare spring kits for my Glocks for this reason. Also spare magazines as the springs in the active use mags will eventually wear out. You could get spare mag springs or spare mags.

The one part I have seen a video of failing on a Glock is the plastic recoil spring guide rod. The gun still worked fine but the end flange melted off and the rod went flying out the the end of the slide. So I would say the recoil spring assembly is doubly good to have a spare (spring wear and plastic rod failure).

Next up would be the extractor which takes a lot of impact and ripping. If it wears or fails you are screwed. So along with a spare extractor spring (in the spring kit) I have a spare extractor for each model I own.

While not a mechanical failure, I consider tiny small parts as at risk for getting lost during occasional detail strip. This would include all pins.

Beyond these parts I can't see what would be likely to fail for a long time.

- Spring kit
- Spare mags or mag springs
- pin kit
- extractor

If you expect heavy external abuse then the plastic sights can be damaged (dragging your pistol on a chain behind your truck, etc.). So you might want to replace the plastic sights with steel ones. :D

3kgt2nv
March 15, 2012, 04:17 PM
the shooter.

seriously the problem with most handguns that i have seen are people that insist on taking the gun apart way to often cause lost parts, bent springs, wear and tear on the frame and slide and sometimes incorrect assembly.

perfect example of this is a 1911 that i got from someone at a gun show for 200 bucks because it had a problem feeding rounds and would jam up constantly. i bought it on the spot and had it transferred to my LGS where i waited to get my new permit to pick it up. I flipped the extractor back over and now have a springfield a1 for 200 bucks that needed a new extractor.

it has since had about 15000 rounds thru the gun flawlessly.

Incognito
March 15, 2012, 04:43 PM
The spring cups (of which there are two) can be easily lost during diassembly/reassembly of the striker assembly, so it wouldn't hurt to have a couple of spares of those if you plan on disassembling that assembly often.
Yeah, you got that right. Those little buggers can fly off of there.

glocktwotwo
March 15, 2012, 04:56 PM
Ive read that the frame rails in glocks with serial numbers that start with an E are prone to breaking....i have a glock22 with E serial numbers and its fine..

AK103K
March 15, 2012, 04:57 PM
If you shoot it a lot, recoil springs, and many be an extractor and its related spring/plunger.

dlb0412
March 15, 2012, 05:02 PM
Whatever you do only buy factory parts no aftermarket.

Mrgunsngear
March 15, 2012, 05:04 PM
The only parts I've ever had to replace on my Glocks due to wear are recoil spring and trigger spring. Other than that, just keep it cleaned and lubed and it'll last a lot longer than you will...

Hammerhead
March 15, 2012, 05:35 PM
Trigger return spring used to be the most failure prone part, but you don't hear too much about that anymore. Recoil guide rods have been know to chip at the rear flange.

gunsmokeTPF
March 15, 2012, 08:43 PM
Aftermarket magazines, especially hi-capacity, cause the most problems. Never use anything other than factory mags.

hoytinak
March 15, 2012, 08:53 PM
The only thing I've had break on a Glock mags, one guide rod and one firing pin.

mongo356
March 16, 2012, 01:47 AM
Recoil Springs- (Gen 3)Recoil springs are suppose to be changed every 5,000rds in everything but 40's they are 3,000rds. The "chipped" guide rods are usually from not re-seating the recoil spring in the half moon slot every time the slide is removed and it will chip the back of the guide rod, usually not causing a problem other than looks though.
The Gen 4 has a different schedule but I'm not certain what they are calling for lately. At my last Glock armorer's course it was 10,000rds for the G22, but I think they have reduced it to 6,000rds or 8,000rds now.

Then probably mag springs, trigger springs, and all the other springs.
Slide lock or extractor may not be bad to have as spares.

That said, I have never had a failure of any kind yet with Glock parts in my 14yrs of Glocking.......but I'm a test sample of 1.

FlySubCompact
March 16, 2012, 04:16 AM
If a newbie "Glock OEM parts buying fellow" was going to research websites with the best prices on OEM parts you guys have mentioned.....which sites have the best deals?

1goodshot
March 16, 2012, 06:16 AM
On my glock 22 Ive had to replace the trigger return spring and slide stop, and a few recoil springs.

Creek Henry
March 16, 2012, 09:51 AM
Looks like the whole thing is prone to failure...

http://boards.420chan.org/nra/src/1326621025006.jpg

TJx
March 16, 2012, 12:02 PM
The spare parts kit I put together after reading this topic on the forums include:

Recoil Spring (more for having it on hand as a regular replacement than breakage)
Slide Lock & Spring
Spring Cups
Trigger Pin
Trigger Housing Pin
Locking Block Pin (not needed on my Gen 2 but I will have a Gen4 at some point)
Firing Pin Spring
Firing Pin Safety & Spring

Probably overkill but parts are cheap. (Midway is a good source)

publius
March 16, 2012, 12:34 PM
The magazine, usually because you have bent the feed lips somehow.

3kgt2nv
March 16, 2012, 12:34 PM
Looks like the whole thing is prone to failure...

good job grabbing a pic from 4chan

unless that is a personal gun or you saw it happen you cannot provide a random picture as a statement like that.

mongo356
March 16, 2012, 12:42 PM
FlySubCompact- If a newbie "Glock OEM parts buying fellow" was going to research websites with the best prices on OEM parts you guys have mentioned.....which sites have the best deals?

I bought most of my stuff several years ago, and don't get to use much of it.
I used lonewolfdist.com & glockparts.com & midwayusa.com
Shipping can vary and "in stock" is usually the big thing for me I hate to wait for backordered stuff.

Hammerhead
March 16, 2012, 01:05 PM
good job grabbing a pic from 4chan

unless that is a personal gun or you saw it happen you cannot provide a random picture as a statement like that.
How else do you expect internet B.S. to spread?

3kgt2nv
March 16, 2012, 02:41 PM
whats sad is ive seen that pic in at least 10 different threads all with different explanations.

just like the chain fired revolver that everyone says is chinese ammo.


internet has more drama than tnt i swear. lol

Crow Hunter
March 16, 2012, 03:21 PM
The best investment that you can make is to join GSSF for $35. Go to a match, try to win a gun, have a good time and then have the armorers inspect and replace all your springs for free.

Alternately, do the same, then take the Armorer's course for $150 and you can buy all your parts from Glock at a signficant discount and be able to add a cool little line to your signature.

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:D


Recoil Spring (more for having it on hand as a regular replacement than breakage)
Slide Lock & Spring
Spring Cups
Trigger Pin
Trigger Housing Pin
Locking Block Pin (not needed on my Gen 2 but I will have a Gen4 at some point)
Firing Pin Spring
Firing Pin Safety & Spring

This is a very good list by the way especially if you add the trigger return spring. (The S spring) Fun fact, a Glock will acutally still fire without this spring if you turn it upside down before you release the trigger.

Also, if you change it out to a NY-1 or NY-2 unit, it changes it to a compression spring instead of a tension spring and pretty much eliminates the potential for failure.

jaysouth
March 16, 2012, 09:36 PM
The only thing that breaks in a chronic fashion when shooting glocks is my wallet.

RamItOne
March 16, 2012, 09:53 PM
The owner....


I don't understand the spare parts. I hear it time after time from glock owners that they like that spare parts are easy to find and that was a big factor in choosing a glock.

I've never had a part failure (knock on wood..or polymer) and Id imagine if let's say my M&P broke I'd use my Walther or one of my Sigs for the time being.