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Timbow
September 16, 2011, 03:12 PM
Why do manufacturers put serrations on the front of so many of their slides? I don't see the purpose other than cosmetics (and IMO they don't look that good). Using proper technique, a shooter shouldn't ever have to grab the front of the slide for any reason. Just curious.

drail
September 16, 2011, 03:56 PM
It comes from the early days of IPSC competition (I was there) when guys started mounting red dot sights that were as big as a Coke can on their 1911s. You could not grab the rear of the slide to rack because the sight and mount were in the way. Custom smiths started milling front serrations. Then everyone started using slide rackers mounted in the unused dovetail for the rear sight. I never used either front or rear serrations for racking. I just squeeze the slide just ahead of the ejection port. Most race guns are sprung pretty lightly.

shabodah
September 16, 2011, 04:02 PM
I for one like the look of them, and am all for anything them helps save weight, too.

Skans
September 16, 2011, 04:05 PM
Sometimes they look good to me. Just depends. I like good looking guns. Other than that, I don't have any function for them.

drail
September 16, 2011, 04:06 PM
How much weight do you believe is saved by milling serrations?:rolleyes:

jimbob86
September 16, 2011, 04:09 PM
Seems to me they would act as saw teeth on leather holsters..... they add nothing to functionality. A net minus.

Chris_B
September 16, 2011, 07:10 PM
for competition, they seem quite effective in a time environment

johnbt
September 16, 2011, 07:14 PM
Cheese graters.

KyJim
September 16, 2011, 07:18 PM
Some shooters like front serrations in 1911s because they aid in press checking without putting fingers in front of the muzzle. I have a couple with front serrations but prefer going without.

Gary Wells
September 16, 2011, 07:22 PM
Aesthetically, I don't care for them, but they do allow you to do a "press check" as and when necessary.

Oops, my bad. Sorry KYJim, was typing when you answered.

armoredman
September 16, 2011, 07:22 PM
Grasp front serrations, turn pistol up side down, rack, chambered round pops into your palm. No chasing.:p
Other than that, nope.

bjones870
September 16, 2011, 10:18 PM
Ive noticed a lot of women, who have trouble chambering in an auto, use them quite frequently. I actually talked to a woman who was looking at an XDM, which I happen to own one, and she did chambered using front serrations. It was just instinctive. Idk why manufacturers do it. But someone uses them haha

orionengnr
September 16, 2011, 10:45 PM
Some shooters like front serrations in 1911s because they aid in press checking without putting fingers in front of the muzzle.
Hmmm...help me understand this logic.

Grasping the slide by the front serrations assists in safely press-checking without putting digits in front of the muzzle.....how?

As opposed to grasping the slide by the rear serrations, which place one's fingers ~ 3" farther aft of the muzzle, and which have served admirably for 100 years or so...

Really?

Jason_G
September 16, 2011, 11:16 PM
Hmmm...help me understand this logic.

Grasping the slide by the front serrations assists in safely press-checking without putting digits in front of the muzzle.....how?

As opposed to grasping the slide by the rear serrations, which place one's fingers ~ 3" farther aft of the muzzle, and which have served admirably for 100 years or so...

Really?

Amen. Not to say the folks that use the front serrations are "doing it wrong", but I never understood it, and still don't. Like you, the rear serrations work just great for me.

Jason

Discern
September 16, 2011, 11:41 PM
Todd Jarrett likes to use them.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ncg9iFgT7GA

JR_Roosa
September 16, 2011, 11:53 PM
When you press check using the front serrations it's hard to rack the slide far enough to eject the round, which is nice.

I don't think they're worth it for that. There are other ways to do a press check. I don't like the aesthetics and they really increase the friction of drawing from my leather holster.

Unfortunately they cut them on many of the pistols I like and you can't really get rid of them once they're there.

J.

SHNOMIDO
September 16, 2011, 11:56 PM
I like em and consider them a plus.

just my two cents. they dont bother me and they help with press checking and dis assembly.

if your slide serrations are harming your holster, you need to write an angry letter to the manufacturer for having serrations machined like a cheese grater, or stop making your own holsters from newspaper and buy one made out of leather.

if its messing up your gear, what the heck is it doing to your hand?!?

edit- Read JR's post. now draw friction is an argument i can respect. Personally doesnt affect me, but its a point i can roll with.

Jason_G
September 17, 2011, 12:01 AM
Todd Jarrett likes to use them.

So should I buy a Para because that's what he shoots too? Wonder what kind of underwear he has on, maybe I should switch to that too.

Not trying to be snarky or rude, but sometimes a little reductio ad absurdum helps clarify things.

Todd Jarrett is a sponsored shooter. I imagine he shoots what he gets paid to shoot. I know a guy that is sponsored by S&W. Guess what he shoots?




Jason

JR_Roosa
September 17, 2011, 12:04 AM
Yeah the square cut colt serrations are really sticky in the holster. If they were cut like traditional serrations they'd be sticky going in but not as much coming out.

J.

Discern
September 17, 2011, 12:59 AM
@ Jason_G

Why the attitude? What I stated was that Todd Jarrett seems to like front serrations. I don't see me mentioning using a Para or the underwear of Todd Jarrett (you can contact him to see what he wears). Todd Jarrett uses front serrations well and his movements are very efficient. His support hand can always stay in front of his strong hand. Nothing ever comes between the sights of the firearm and his eyes. The OP asked about the usefulness of front serrations, and I replied with a post of a video with someone who uses them.

gyvel
September 17, 2011, 03:25 AM
Front slide serrations are definitely not a new idea. Some of the Colt/Browning 1900 .38 autos had front slide serrations, as well as some 1902 Military models and at least one external hammer .45 ACP prototype.

Jason_G
September 17, 2011, 08:26 AM
@ Jason_G

Why the attitude?

Sorry. I was tired, a little cranky, and operating on not much sleep. I apologize, but I honestly didn't mean to be rude. I thought your post was saying that because Todd Jarrett uses them, we should too. I was just trying to illustrate that the reasoning didn't make sense to me.

The part about the fact that he shoots a Para was because I didn't rewatch that video at first (I'd seen it many times before), and didn't realize he actually ever even touched the front serrations. I didn't remember him ever using them, so I thought you were just pointing out that they were simply there. You didn't mention much in your post, so it looked like a drive-by, which I took it to be.

Anyway, as seen in the video, he obviously prefers to rack the slide from the front of the gun. I don't know what his reasoning is, but I'd imagine that's a habit that came from shooting lightly sprung race guns in competition. I could be wrong though.

Personally, I think it's a bad idea for a couple of reasons:


In a SD situation, you're probably going to be shaky, full of adrenaline, and your focus will be on the attacker. In those circumstances, do you really want your hand that close to the muzzle when racking? There are perfectly good serrations on the rear of the gun.

Again, in a SD situation, would you rather be able to use your entire hand, palm and all, to rack the slide from the rear, or have to rely on pinching the slide with your fingers, which are going to have little strength, and a lot of shakiness?


That's not to say that folks that use the front ones are wrong. If that's what makes them feel comfortable, so be it, but I can do all the manipulations I need with the rear of the slide. That's what makes sense to me.

JMHO.

Jason

mkk41
September 17, 2011, 08:41 AM
I too think they are useless , but front slide serrations are nothing new. Some early (1902s) Colts had them.

http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v491/mkk41/1906Colt.jpg
http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v491/mkk41/1902m.gif
http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v491/mkk41/1902colt.jpg

Kreyzhorse
September 17, 2011, 08:59 AM
I think they look good and prefer them on 1911s. Functionally I can live without them however.

Shane Tuttle
September 17, 2011, 09:04 AM
Grasping the slide by the front serrations assists in safely press-checking without putting digits in front of the muzzle.....how?

If you haven't clicked on Discern's link to Todd Jarrett, it will show you how.

Most of the reasons listed here are why front serrations are on many guns. I tend to like having the front serrations for means of press checking. Just because there's other ways of verifying a round in the chamber doesn't mean one should be dismissive of having the option of press checking as well. Everyone is different in their methods. People need to get over themselves.

Do I like the looks of front serrations? Hell, no! I think it's ugly as sin...

KyJim
September 17, 2011, 09:24 AM
One minor point. Todd Jarrett doesn't shoot for Para anymore. He is apparently developing a line of products as well as instructing. http://www.toddjarrett.com/index.php

WESHOOT2
September 20, 2011, 06:10 PM
Front serrations are useful for certain proper techniques.

jimbob86
September 20, 2011, 06:12 PM
Front serrations are useful for certain proper techniques.


So ..... um....... er...... there's a proper technique...... to tearing up a good leather holster?

WESHOOT2
September 20, 2011, 06:18 PM
Do not disparage a technique simply because you don't understand it.


And really, get a better holster ;)

C0untZer0
September 20, 2011, 06:18 PM
I don't think that any handguns have the serrations in the right spots.

The rear serrations are in the right spot for the thumb on my left hand but when I rack the slide my four finger fall just forward of where serrations on autos normally end, under the port and my pinky is just forward of the port - about where the front of the trigger gaurd is on most autos.

That's where the serrations should be IMO.