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Firepower!
May 8, 2010, 05:18 PM
Hi
More than ever, I am hearing 'tactical' rifle over and over again. What is the minimum requirement of equipement for a rifle to have before we can call it a tactical rifle? Technically speaking, do the accessories alone make a rifle tactical or there needs to be a mechanical improvements as well?

Finally, do you own or plan to own a tactical rifle?

Thanks

Webleymkv
May 8, 2010, 05:23 PM
Tactical=black with a rail and at least $100 higher price tag.

In all seriousness, tactical has become a marketing term and doesn't really have any hard and fast meaning. Any number of features can be deemed enough to make a gun tactical by the manufacturer including a different barrel length, different finish, different magazine capacity, presence of a rail, etc.

Anymore, it's a word that's thrown around rather loosely in order to sell stuff. Kind of like how nearly every new cartridge has to have the word "Magnum" in the name.

B.L.E.
May 8, 2010, 05:28 PM
I think it's simply a buzzword for combat style rifles and there is no well defined definition.

It seems to increasingly mean totally pimped out weapons. If only they can figure out how to put a boom box and spinning hubcaps on a carbine, they probably will.

L_Killkenny
May 8, 2010, 05:40 PM
Tactical is more of a mind set and marketing tool than a gun. If you think tactical is tacticool than more than likely any gun you have is tactical. Even you're Daisy Red Ryder. You're also more prone to buying overpriced crap to mount on your gun without a good reason.

An AR can be tactical or a great target, competition or hunting arm. AN AK or SKS can be a great plinkin gun or tactical. A lever gun can be a handy plinkin/hunting/sd gun or it can be tactical. Etc, Etc.

In short, if you think a gun is a weapon it's tactical. If you think it's a tool than it's not. My guns are tools.

LK

Palmetto-Pride
May 8, 2010, 05:43 PM
tac·ti·cal   /ˈtæktɪkəl/ Show Spelled[tak-ti-kuhl] Show IPA
–adjective
1.of or pertaining to tactics, esp. military or naval tactics.
2.characterized by skillful tactics or adroit maneuvering or procedure: tactical movements.
3.of or pertaining to a maneuver or plan of action designed as an expedient toward gaining a desired end or temporary advantage.
4.expedient; calculated.
5.prudent; politic.**

BlkHawk73
May 8, 2010, 06:44 PM
Tactical=black with a rail and at least $100 higher price tag.

In all seriousness, tactical has become a marketing term and doesn't really have any hard and fast meaning. Any number of features can be deemed enough to make a gun tactical by the manufacturer including a different barrel length, different finish, different magazine capacity, presence of a rail, etc.

Anymore, it's a word that's thrown around rather loosely in order to sell stuff. Kind of like how nearly every new cartridge has to have the word "Magnum" in the name.


That's about as perfect of an answer as there could be. "Tactical" is nothing more than a term used as a marketing tool to make anything sound tougher and superior. It also seems to be the same term many people use to describe their stuff in an effort to make what they have seem better and superior so they can bask in that shadow. :rolleyes:

RockyMtnTactical
May 8, 2010, 07:27 PM
If you read the definition posted by Palmetto State it is pretty obvious. A "tactical rifle" could easily be called a "defensive rifle" (which is my preference), but who cares?

"Tactical" in reference to equipment or rifles is centered around it's primary purpose.

"Tactical rifle" is not exactly a very common term though actually in my experience. I've never referred to my AR15's as "tactical rifles" as far back as I can recall, but I guess you could call them that.

Frankly, it is a bit of a silly question IMO. Is "Hunting rifle" a marketing term or marketing ploy? You hear it all the time and many people claim to have "Hunting rifles".

What makes a "hunting rifle" a "hunting rifle" or a "Target rifle" a "Target rifle"? It's pretty obvious.

To me, a "Tactical rifle" would be any long gun that you would use to defend your life. An SKS can be a tactical rifle. So could an M4 or any other "assault weapon" and everything in between, semi auto, full auto, bolt, whatever... even a pump shotgun.

Jimro
May 8, 2010, 07:36 PM
All firearms capable of launching a bullet are "tactical" in the sense that they can be used as tools for armed conflict.

Your big game hunting rifle? It's a long range murder weapon according to the VPC and Brady bunch.

Your benchrest or target rifle? It's a long range murder weapon according to the same bunch.

Your semi-automatic sporting rifle? It's an "assault weapon" designed solely to kill.

Your snub nose revolver? a "saturday night special".

Your semi automatic pistol? Well Washington DC considers it a machine gun.

Your pump action shotgun? a purpose built murder weapon that leaves no ballistic signature on the pellets.

Remember that more Americans have been killed by the single shot rifled musket than any other weapon.

All firearms are "tactical" unless they've been demilled or otherwise made inoperative.

Jimro

B. Lahey
May 8, 2010, 07:41 PM
If it's useful against targets smaller than ports, railyards, and industrial complexes, it's tactical. Never seen a strategic rifle to make the term mean anything with regard to firearms, but we can always hope somebody will build one.:)

RockyMtnTactical
May 8, 2010, 07:43 PM
It really just kind of depends on your perspective I guess.

http://i166.photobucket.com/albums/u87/RMTactical/77d3d70b.jpg

BeerSleeper
May 8, 2010, 07:54 PM
The same thing that makes bacon tactical. http://cmmginc.secure-mall.com/shop/?cat=172

A "T" and then an "a" with a "ct" followed by "i" then a "c" and last, an "al" on the label make it tactical. It probably cost more, too.

Kinda the same system as "keep putting stickers on your civic until it's faster than my camaro".

22-rimfire
May 9, 2010, 07:38 PM
To be honest, I don't know other than rifles designed for military and police use. Maybe black? Maybe tactical rifles have military sights? Stock design? Flash hider? Higher capacity detachable magazines (relative to your typical sporter)? The word sells rifles and handguns. I want a tacti-cool rifle.

rudeboy3
May 9, 2010, 08:19 PM
I always think of tactical rifles having features that would give the user a tactical advantage over an opponent. If someone is in my house at dark and I grab a rifle with a pressure operated light switch I would consider that a tactical feature because I can see. If a modded bolt action that has a silencer and a very good scope that can hit 1000 yards, I would say that is a tactical advantage over the norm. IMHO:rolleyes:

Chris_B
May 9, 2010, 08:21 PM
I lubs me my 1944 era tacticool rifle. It had a black stock when I got it (although I stupidly cleaned it off so now it looks like "walnut", defeating the decades of tactical dirt/sweat/oil blackening , or, as I call it, Tac-Blak [tm]). It has military sights, adjustable for windage AND range (it even has a tactical term, "Battle Range", right on the rear sight), and a bayonet lug, to which I can attach a bayonet with a 16" blade. The sling is a tactical sling, with multi-position attachment points, and is a two-piece tactical advantage sling, which can also be broken down into straps for gear, or, as a belt for your pants. This tactical leather sling also can be used in a variety of ways for bracing the shooter while firing in three distinct shooting positions. The stock has a tactical, two compartment storage unit in the butt, which in itself holds a multi-tool, oiler, and a multi piece cleaning tool. The lid of the tactical storage compartment can be opened, the bayonet fixed, and the rifle thrust into the ground, providing a hook for a bag of plasma during emergency first aid treatment. Yup. The M1 Garand is certainly a tactical rifle

http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v441/Chuck_Older/m1rec.jpg

RT
May 9, 2010, 08:23 PM
It used to be black with pic rail made a rifle tactical, but now I thing Flat Dark Earth is required.

Chris_B
May 9, 2010, 08:31 PM
How about Coyote Tan? Is that still tactical?

Art Eatman
May 9, 2010, 11:37 PM
Used to be, semi-auto versions of military rifles were just labelled "para-military". ARs and AK/SKSs, mostly. Then the advertising/marketing guys got into the game, and gun guys started thinking up all the add-on stuff to increase sales via hype.

Not a lot different from "sniper" or "police" stuff...

Picher
May 10, 2010, 06:21 AM
When someone takes a youth-sized single-shot, paints it in dual pink camo, mounts a 4-30x camo scope, laser, and flashlight, installs a bipod and a half-dozen rails and pink camo sling; then, calls it "Tactical", maybe; just maybe that most overused word will be dropped from our shooting vocabulary.

kimbershot
May 10, 2010, 06:32 AM
tactical can mean anything you want it to. tacticool--great for those selling accessories.:D

SR420
May 10, 2010, 08:37 AM
Tactic \Tac"tic\, Tactical \Tac"tic*al\, a. [Gr. taktiko`s. See tactics.]

Of or pertaining to military or naval tactics; hence, pertaining to, or characterized by, planning or maneuvering for the short term;

-- contrasted with strategic, planning for the long term. -- Tac"tic*al*ly, adv. [Webster 1913 Suppl.]

Doc Intrepid
May 10, 2010, 10:26 AM
When you have one word that means so many different things to so many different people, then it is essentially meaningless: the word does not have one commonly accepted definition.

While all the definitions of the word described above may work for different folks, the word originally referred to design characteristics.

RockyMtnTactical had a pretty good observation when he asked how "hunting rifles" were different from "tactical rifles". They're designed to meet different specifications:

(From a Marine Corps infantry point of view) in a gunfight you want to place high volumes of fire on specified objectives. You want high capacity rifle magazines, external to the firearm (so if they are bent they don't hamper the functioning of the rifle), lightweight, and easy to change quickly. You prefer a flash suppressor so you don't give your position away, without slots on the bottom, so if you're firing over a rampart or from the prone you don't kick up a dust cloud. The USMC still has bayonets it its inventory, because there is the possibility that your position will be over-run. When I was in the USMC infantry bayonet training was still taught - although with the M-4 I tend to doubt it still is today.

In terms of sights, infantry rifles get banged around a lot, especially inside aircraft, climbing steep terrain, and in built up areas. Optics that are fragile, and anything that requires batteries, are sort of a net negative for an infantry unit - they tend to break or not work when you need them to. Obviously optics are more useful in some units than others, but in an infantry environment whatever optics are issued should be designed to survive in a relatively harsh environment (in terms of dust, grit, impacts, moisture, seals, etc.) Manual sights need to be able to be used very rapidly and simply. IMHO, the M-16A2 sights that could be adjusted using a 5.56mm round were a good example of rugged yet useful infantry rifle sights for ranges from 200-500 meters.

In contrast, a hunting rifle requires very few similar design specifications. You can only legally carry a limited number of rounds in it; you do not require high-capacity external magazines that can rapidly be changed; to achieve enhanced accuracy you'll generally use an optical sight much larger, heavier, and more fragile than an infantry optic; most hunting rifles generally have no iron sights at all; they requires no flash suppressor or bayonet; etc.

So what makes a rifle a "tactical" rifle are the various design specifications that were originally identified to optimize it's utility in a combat environment.

In the same manner, a "hunting" rifle has been designed to optimize it's utility in a "hunting" environment.

Can you use either for either purpose? Sure. But that isn't necessarily what they were designed for. And therein lies the difference.

FWIW. YMMV.

Doc

zombieslayer
May 10, 2010, 10:51 AM
What makes a product "tactical" ?? The company who makes product has a marketing department that decides when something is "tactical". I saw a new Stoeger coachgun- black with a rail! Tactical double barrel. :confused:

fisherman66
May 10, 2010, 10:56 AM
The person shooting it makes it tactical.

rdsii64
May 10, 2010, 11:45 AM
In todays's market, the word tactical gets thrown around a lot. its kind of like the term sniper rifle. in the hands of a trained sniper a ruger single shot .22 is a sniper rifle. A full on GAP built milspic precision long range rifle is nothing more than a glorified target rifle in the hands of someone who can't use it.

SR420
May 10, 2010, 11:51 AM
Firepower!

More than ever, I am hearing 'tactical' rifle over and over again.

I would rather hear 'tactical' rifle over and over again than hear 'assault rifle' over and over again.

fisherman66
May 10, 2010, 12:09 PM
ruger single shot .22

If you are talking about a 22LR; thems are hen's teeth. If ya gots one I'll buy it offs ya.

rickyrick
May 10, 2010, 05:05 PM
If you were standing on the porch with a double barrel, it was just a shotgun.........

If maw held the lantern so that you could see who you was shootin at in the melon patch.......it just became tactical, multiple projectile weapon system.

Webleymkv
May 10, 2010, 05:23 PM
Really, I view the word "tactical" as more of an adverb than an adjective. In the strictest sense of the word, "tactical" refers to an action that is taken to adhere to your tactics such as executing a tactical retreat or performing a tactical reload.

Referring to an object as "tactical", therefore using the word as an adjective, should really be dependant upon how the object is intended to be used and how that applies to your tactics. For example, if your tactics require a very accurate long-range shot, then a Ruger M77 in 7mm Rem. Magnum with a 10x scope would be more "tactical" than an AR-15 in 5.56 NATO with a 2x Red Dot. Likewise, if your tactics dictate that you shouldn't leave spent shell casings, a S&W Model 10 would be more "tactical" than a HK Mark 23.

Referring generically to a particular type of firearm as "tactical" is really a misnomer unless you know what the tactics of the user will be. In that sense, nearly all firearms are "tactical" as in some situation any gun can offer an advantage of tactics over another.

Where the use of the word really becomes obnoxious is when it's used outside of firearms. For example, I just saw an advertisement in a catalog for, I kid you not, tactical socks and tactical boxer shorts. I fail to see how these items provide any advantage in tactics beyond allowing the fashion-conscious mall ninja to color-coordinate with the rest of his "tactical" wardrobe.

TPAW
May 10, 2010, 08:50 PM
What makes a rifle 'tactical'?

A lot of ninja mall stuff!.....:p

Firepower!
May 13, 2010, 01:55 PM
What makes a rifle 'tactical'?

A lot of ninja mall stuff!.....


Bascially it is ture.

Krieger9
May 13, 2010, 02:15 PM
Strategic Rifles are in a different category and more designed to take out factories and financial assets of the enemy versus a tactical rifle which is more about immediate and immenant threats to yourself.

dogngun
May 13, 2010, 03:38 PM
Most of the "tactical" stuff is just salesmanship and unnecessary. People like to tinker with rifles and bolting on this crap makes many people feel like they have accomplished something. And it has made money for the seller.

mark

flight954
May 13, 2010, 03:45 PM
None of my firearms are "tactical" because they are never used in a "tactical" situation:D

rickyrick
May 13, 2010, 09:02 PM
Since this one bubbled back up,

If the owner/operator of the weapon has; lots of pockets, straps and Velcro on his clothes.... uses other paramilitary buzzwords....and lastly, refers to his rifle as 'tactical' then that makes the rifle tactical.

on the other hand a regular gun enthusiast can posses the exact same weapon and just have a really cool rifle

all in good fun, nothing technically wrong with the tactical crowd and their lifestyle choice;)

somebody can start a regular guy thread. I won't cry or nothing:)

williamd
May 13, 2010, 09:23 PM
The Gov't defines them ... so they can ban them!

MGMike
May 13, 2010, 10:02 PM
It's meaningless. Last year the buzzword was "Extreme." Next year it will be something else coined by advertising departments to separate fools from their money.

M

Rattlehead
May 13, 2010, 10:06 PM
Tactical=black with a rail and at least $100 higher price tag.

In all seriousness, tactical has become a marketing term and doesn't really have any hard and fast meaning. Any number of features can be deemed enough to make a gun tactical by the manufacturer including a different barrel length, different finish, different magazine capacity, presence of a rail, etc.

Anymore, it's a word that's thrown around rather loosely in order to sell stuff. Kind of like how nearly every new cartridge has to have the word "Magnum" in the name.

Quoted for truth. The amusing part is, it's probably pretty effective.

Bamashooter
May 13, 2010, 10:23 PM
so if i wear my glasses while shooting they become tactical?

B.L.E.
May 13, 2010, 10:26 PM
For only $24.75, you too can own your own tactical pen (http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B002CQXM1Y), and marked down from $40.01, it's a bargain too.:D

Art Eatman
May 13, 2010, 10:57 PM
Enuf. If folks haven't figured it out by now, they ain't gonna. :)