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robotman
January 23, 2010, 01:12 PM
I am wondering if anyone else has taken the effort to build their own rifle stocks?
Here is something I built for my Weatherby Vanguard 30.06 rifle.

I would like some feedback on the block I made for the tip of the barrel. I have shot it 12 times with federal 150 grain bullets but only at 30 yds (all I can shoot at home). It seems to work as long as I let the barrel cool off between shots. The block is not a rest, it actually goes around the barrel tip about 2/3 of the diameter. I coarse cut it with my router and then I hand fitted it with my Dremels little sanding drum. I then bedded it with good ole JB Weld, a very thin layer. The end of the stock has a cast weight made from wheel weights that is held in by the 4 bolts that hold the compensator. The compensator is 1" x 1" steel tubing I had left over from a pig spit project. The whole thing was made with hand tools, router, power miter box, table saw, belt sander, files and sandpaper. It took about a month of spare time to get it to the "shooting state".

It is all aluminum tubing with 3 different sizes nested together and JB Welded together. The triple tubing extends to just behind the recoil lug. At the reciol lug bolt location, I ground a 3/4" diameter solid alum. round to fit the inside of the big tube and sandwiched it in 1-1/2" of JB. The trigger guard took about 6 hours to make. The recoil lug and the back of the action fit into pockets I cut with my router. The whole thing with scope weighs about 20 pounds. I am still working on the details. I modeled the pistol grip on my Ruger Mark 1 but my finger laps over the trigger too much. I am going to add some wood grips to make it fatter and increase the distance to the trigger a little. I also did a hillbilly trigger job. I used a ball point pen spring to lighten the pull and I polished the sear with rouge and my Dremel 1" buffing wheel. It probably takes 5-6 ounces to break it. I found that it is best to not hold on to the gun. Just kinda nestle up to it and pull the trigger. Not much recoil at that weight!

rickdavis81
January 23, 2010, 01:49 PM
Creative, but I probaly would have tried to float the barrel somehow instead of supporting it at the end. But there are more than one way to skin a cat. How did it group at 30 yards?

KEN K
January 23, 2010, 01:57 PM
Reworked 4 mil-surps so far, I'm a retired cabinet maker so I love to work with wood, made a Mauser and a Mosin stock out of oak and an other from black walnut, Used walnut for my favorite Arisaka 99. those thumb hole stocks are really comfortable to shoot. Also made some nice rattle snake slings for myself and two friends and a nephew. Two on left are diamond back rattler other two are timber rattler. Only took a couple of days to make the stock but the checkering took weeks. Free floated the barrels useing bondo.

Rembrandt
January 23, 2010, 02:28 PM
Made this one from a blank of Pakkawood, very dense laminate used for knife handles. Have more into it than I planned. Finished with an automotive polyurethane clear coat.

http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v405/Rembrandt51/10-22f.jpg
http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v405/Rembrandt51/Stock1.jpg
http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v405/Rembrandt51/Stock2.jpg
http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v405/Rembrandt51/VoquartsenSniper.jpg

robotman
January 23, 2010, 05:11 PM
KEN K said
Reworked 4 mil-surps so far, I'm a retired cabinet maker so I love to work with wood, made a Mauser and a Mosin stock out of oak and an other from black walnut, Used walnut for my favorite Arisaka 99. those thumb hole stocks are really comfortable to shoot. Also made some nice rattle snake slings for myself and two friends and a nephew. Two on left are diamond back rattler other two are timber rattler. Only took a couple of days to make the stock but the checkering took weeks. Free floated the barrels useing bondo.

We have a Savage 93R17BV with a thumbhole stock and it is very comfortable to shoot. How did you do the shaping?


rickdavis81 said
Creative, but I probaly would have tried to float the barrel somehow instead of supporting it at the end. But there are more than one way to skin a cat. How did it group at 30 yards?

The scope had been on the rifle in the original stock and was sighted in for zero at 100 yds. It came up 3" high at 30 yds on the first shot and about a 1/2" right. I was pretty antsy and did not wait long between shots while trying to bring it in on the bull. I shot an inch high and 1/2" left after the first scope adjustment. Over the course of the next 6 shots I walked it around the bull about 3/4". I finally realized I was holding on too tight. I started doing 2 click at a time adjustments for 3 shots and had it creeping up to 3/8" low on center when I decided I had figured out to shoot it and quit. As to the free floating, I had the barrel free floated and the action bedded in the factory stock and it would shoot 1-1/2" cloverleafs at 100 yds. I just thought I would try the block to control whip. I will take the block off and try it without it too.

Rembrandt That is a beautiful rifle. I don't think I would have the patience to make something that good. I can appreciate the time you must have in its creation. It seems to me that your name is appropiate as that is indeed a work of art.

KEN K
January 24, 2010, 01:24 AM
Hey Rembrandt: Were did you get that laminated plank to make your stock? I like the look of the laminate and know it is very stable but don't know were to find it. I get my walnut at a local lumber yard but am limited as to width and thickness, so have to stay within those bounds which limits design somewhat. I use a wipe on poly finish thats easy to touch up if you get a scratch or whatever. That is a beautiful piece of work, is it all done by hand? you have good eye for form and function.

Rembrandt
January 24, 2010, 01:22 PM
...Hey Rembrandt: Were did you get that laminated plank to make your stock?....beautiful piece of work, is it all done by hand?

Got the blank from Tom Volquartsen many years ago, cost about $400....all inletting and shaping was done by hand. Difficult material to work with, very dense, almost like working with aluminum.